Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [TexasCzechs] German Surnames In Central Texas

Expand Messages
  • Valorie Michna
    According to my history books, there were political conflicts between Czechs (the majority) and Germans (the ruling minority).  At the local and personal
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 15, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      According to my history books, there were political conflicts between Czechs (the majority) and Germans (the ruling minority).  At the local and personal level, many people got along just fine with everyone else because they were in the same social class.  Language was a matter of neccesity (a Czech Moravian would speak German because they were their customers, etc) not an indication of cultural identity.
       
      I do know,however, that some individuals held grudges against members of the other culture.  I assume that some of this prejudice was lost after they immigrated because many people in a given area were of the same social class (family farming, common religious background, and similiar cultural experiences).  At least that is how it played out in my family.

      --- On Wed, 4/15/09, Rosemary Ermis <roseermis@...> wrote:

      From: Rosemary Ermis <roseermis@...>
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] German Surnames In Central Texas
      To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, April 15, 2009, 1:23 PM

      Hi Valorie,
       
      You are absolutely right about German surnames and Czech nationality.  Whenever I question a surname, I usually check the census, sometimes the 1900, 1910, 1920, and 1930 census to see if anyone is claiming Czech/Slovak ancestry.
       
      My guess is that these people were really German who moved to Moravia/Bohemia/ Slovakia, and after a hundred years or so of speaking Moravian/Bohemian/ Slovakian language, they essentially "became" Czech/Slovak. 
       
      Does anyone know the true reason?
       
      Rosemary Ermis
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2009 7:04 AM
      Subject: [TexasCzechs] German Surnames In Central Texas

      FYI for those looking at obits/info in the Jarrell, Corn Hill, Granger, Taylor area-
       
      It isn't uncommon to see some German surnames comingled with the Czech ones since there were several German families that settled in the area in the 1800s as well (Schwertner, Bayer/Beyer, Tschoerner, etc).  I am familiar with the ones at Corn Hill, but I know there are others from the Taylor-Elgin area (Meyer, Brinkmeyer, etc).  As a result, there are many people from that area who have both Czech and German ancestry.  I use the terms Czech and German in the cultural sense, since many of these people were from the same part of Austria and probably immigrated to Central Texas for the same reasons.


    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.