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Bohemian, Moravian, or Czech

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  • Buster Mitchell
    The longer your family has been in America the less likely they are to consider themselves as Czech and more likely to refer to themselves as Bohemian or
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 2, 2009
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      The longer your family has been in America the less likely they are to consider themselves as Czech and more likely to refer to themselves as Bohemian or Moravian...
      I have family that immigrated in 1858-1860 (to avoid fighting in the Austrian-Hungarian Civil War) only to find themselves fighting in the American Civil War... one side of the family was from western Bohemia and would have been pressed into battle on the side of the Austrians and the other come from eastern Moravian which likely would have put them on the Hungarian side... luckily enough they were able to come to Texas via Indianola, Galveston, and New Orleans. 
      If you look back at the history of the Czech Lands, there have been multiple times when Bohemia and Moravia were joined as one, with first one ruling and then the other, they have split and rejoined countless times, and they have ruled vast lands outside their current borders on numerous occasions as well, in fact, in the 15th century the Bohemians even defeated the Holy Roman Empire in battle.
      Jan Žižka (1360-1424) a Bohemian general is still studied today in War Colleges worldwide for his military tactics and innovations.
       
      Buster  <((><


      --- On Thu, 4/2/09, Valorie Michna <vmichna@...> wrote:

      From: Valorie Michna <vmichna@...>
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Census entries and "Czech" Places of Origin
      To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, April 2, 2009, 6:55 AM

      My family always thought the family came from Bohemia because Grandma and Grandpa Michna said that they were Bohemian.  The Czech language is also called Bohemian (according to the history books I have), so maybe the census recorder did not understand the difference if the family identified themselves as Bohemian which really meant Czech as an ethnicity and did not designate an actual place of origin. 
      Valorie Michna
      Researching Michna and Sasin/Sassin

      --- On Thu, 4/2/09, Richard <richard_martin86@ yahoo.com> wrote:

      From: Richard <richard_martin86@ yahoo.com>
      Subject: [TexasCzechs] Census entries and "Czech" Places of Origin
      To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Thursday, April 2, 2009, 2:22 AM

      I thought I had posted something about this a few days back, but I cannot find the post, nor a reply.

      I was wondering what the reason was for Moravians being listed in census reports up to 1910 as being from "Bohemia". just wanted to hear an official answer, if anyone has it.

      Thank you!
      Richard



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