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  • Kotrla RJ (Richard)
    Here in Texas City, Texas, USA, it s 10:30 p.m., and most sane people are asleep. However, there are some of us awake, and yes, even at work. I currently work
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 10, 2000
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      Topics Of Discussion

      Here in Texas City, Texas, USA, it's 10:30 p.m., and most sane people are asleep.

      However, there are some of us awake, and yes, even at work.

      I currently work inside a petrochemical plant, manning phones and a computer, and this time of the night, it's quiet, (for now), and it gives me a chance to reflect on many things, including my Czech heritage. I am, like a lot of you, one of the lucky ones who are 100 percent Czech.  But at the same time, I consider anyone who has .0000000000001 percent Czech blood in them to be Czech, or perhaps were blessed to have married a Czech, which makes them Czech, too.  At least, according to my thinking, that is.  So, I wonder, what is the one single thing that makes us proud to be Czech.  For most of us, there are a thousand reasons.  But if you could only name one reason, and that's what I am asking for as a topic of discussion, what would that be?

      For me, it would be the values/character traits that were instilled in by parents, and perhaps were actually genetically passed on. I am thinking of the things like the importance of family and friends; the willingness to share your last penny with another, particular another Czech; honesty, being willing to work hard and for long hours; and best of all, the ability to have fun....

    • Julie Matus
      Hi Richard - What it means to be Czech? I agree about the work ethic - when we decide to do something, we do it well, not halfway. We do love to help people
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 10, 2000
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        Hi Richard -

        What it means to be Czech? I agree about the work ethic - when we decide
        to do something, we do it well, not halfway. We do love to help people out
        and do not expect pay in return (within reason, of course - we do have to
        buy groceries!). But what a great feeling to help someone when they need
        help!

        Our oldest daughter is almost 28 and one day on her day off she called me
        about 8:30 and said sometime she really wishes she wasn't our daughter - I
        was confused! She said here it is, her day off (from Kroger), she could
        sleep late, just lay around and watch TV, but instead, she is already up
        thinking what she could do in the yard, what plants she could go buy to
        plant in the flower bed, etc. She said many of her co-workers talk about
        their days off and how they sleep late, then maybe rent a couple of movies
        and don't do anything else. I said sorry, that's just not us. Our second
        daughter (26) also has a house, keeps up her yard really nice, has flowers
        in her front flower bed, a mini garden in her back yard just big enough for
        tomatoes and peppers. Our son lives in an apartment and has planted
        different bulbs and things in pots on his patio. There's just something
        about Czechs and the ground and nature! When my uncle passed away, his
        sister, a nun, spoke of her brother and said that she knows how he enjoyed
        working in the yard and the flower beds and how she believed anyone who
        works God's soil so diligently, is close to God. There is so much more to
        be thankful for!

        Good luck on your new job!

        Just a reminder - Father's Day is the 110th annual church picnic at St.
        John the Baptist Catholic Church in Ammannsville.

        Later, Julie Herzik Matus

        At 11:42 PM 6/10/00 -0400, you wrote:
        > Here in Texas City, Texas, USA, it's 10:30 p.m., and most sane people
        >are asleep. However, there are some of us awake, and yes, even at work.
        > But if you could only name one reason, and that's what I am asking
        >for as a topic of discussion, what would that be? For me, it would be the
        >values/character traits that were instilled in by parents, and perhaps were
        >actually genetically passed on. I am thinking of the things like the
        >importance of family and friends; the willingness to share your last penny
        >with another, particular another Czech; honesty, being willing to work hard
        >and for long hours; and best of all, the ability to have fun....
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        >
        >
        >
      • Kotrla RJ (Richard)
        Julie, Thanks for your reply. You bring up an excellent point about our love for the soil. I cannot think of any Czech past, or present, who doesn t enjoy
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 10, 2000
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          Julie,

          Thanks for your reply.

          You bring up an excellent point about our love for the soil.

          I cannot think of any Czech past, or present, who doesn't enjoy working the
          soil.

          And working this precious earth that the good Lord gave us does bring us
          closer to Him.

          I know how much my late parents enjoyed working the soil.

          And I always have a garden....

          An excellent take on what it means to be Czech.

          Richard



          ----------
          From: Julie Matus [SMTP:juwemat@...]
          Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2000 10:57 PM
          To: texasczechs@egroups.com
          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Topics Of Discussion

          Hi Richard -

          What it means to be Czech? I agree about the work ethic - when we
          decide
          to do something, we do it well, not halfway. We do love to help
          people out
          and do not expect pay in return (within reason, of course - we do
          have to
          buy groceries!). But what a great feeling to help someone when they
          need
          help!

          Our oldest daughter is almost 28 and one day on her day off she
          called me
          about 8:30 and said sometime she really wishes she wasn't our
          daughter - I
          was confused! She said here it is, her day off (from Kroger), she
          could
          sleep late, just lay around and watch TV, but instead, she is
          already up
          thinking what she could do in the yard, what plants she could go buy
          to
          plant in the flower bed, etc. She said many of her co-workers talk
          about
          their days off and how they sleep late, then maybe rent a couple of
          movies
          and don't do anything else. I said sorry, that's just not us. Our
          second
          daughter (26) also has a house, keeps up her yard really nice, has
          flowers
          in her front flower bed, a mini garden in her back yard just big
          enough for
          tomatoes and peppers. Our son lives in an apartment and has planted
          different bulbs and things in pots on his patio. There's just
          something
          about Czechs and the ground and nature! When my uncle passed away,
          his
          sister, a nun, spoke of her brother and said that she knows how he
          enjoyed
          working in the yard and the flower beds and how she believed anyone
          who
          works God's soil so diligently, is close to God. There is so much
          more to
          be thankful for!

          Good luck on your new job!

          Just a reminder - Father's Day is the 110th annual church picnic at
          St.
          John the Baptist Catholic Church in Ammannsville.

          Later, Julie Herzik Matus

          At 11:42 PM 6/10/00 -0400, you wrote:
          > Here in Texas City, Texas, USA, it's 10:30 p.m., and most sane
          people
          >are asleep. However, there are some of us awake, and yes, even at
          work.
          > But if you could only name one reason, and that's what I am
          asking
          >for as a topic of discussion, what would that be? For me, it would
          be the
          >values/character traits that were instilled in by parents, and
          perhaps were
          >actually genetically passed on. I am thinking of the things like
          the
          >importance of family and friends; the willingness to share your
          last penny
          >with another, particular another Czech; honesty, being willing to
          work hard
          >and for long hours; and best of all, the ability to have fun....

          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          >
          >
          >


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        • danbea@cvtv.net
          I am one of the silent ones and my heritage is 25% Czech and 75% German. I gather a lot of information about Czech heritage from you good folks who have so
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 11, 2000
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            I am one of the silent ones and my heritage is 25% Czech and 75% German.  I gather a lot of information about Czech heritage from you good folks who have so much to share and which I appreciate so much.  Keep up the good work.

            My Czech grandfather, Frank Martinak, the son of John Martinak and Christina Supak, from the Colorado, Fayette, Austin County area of Texas, was also very fluent in German and therefore my knowledge of the Czech people and their culture is of really great benefit to me.  The cultures have similar characteristics but my Czech grandfather had a BIG heart and was a FUN-loving person, which in my family, was the noticeable difference in the two cultures.

            The stories of the heritage are of special interest to me.  Thanks for being there!

            Bea Rost, La Grange, Texas

            Kotrla RJ (Richard) wrote:

             

            Here in Texas City, Texas, USA, it's 10:30 p.m., and most sane people are asleep.

            However, there are some of us awake, and yes, even at work.

            I currently work inside a petrochemical plant, manning phones and a computer, and this time of the night, it's quiet, (for now), and it gives me a chance to reflect on many things, including my Czech heritage. I am, like a lot of you, one of the lucky ones who are 100 percent Czech.  But at the same time, I consider anyone who has .0000000000001 percent Czech blood in them to be Czech, or perhaps were blessed to have married a Czech, which makes them Czech, too.  At least, according to my thinking, that is.  So, I wonder, what is the one single thing that makes us proud to be Czech.  For most of us, there are a thousand reasons.  But if you could only name one reason, and that's what I am asking for as a topic of discussion, what would that be?

            For me, it would be the values/character traits that were instilled in by parents, and perhaps were actually genetically passed on. I am thinking of the things like the importance of family and friends; the willingness to share your last penny with another, particular another Czech; honesty, being willing to work hard and for long hours; and best of all, the ability to have fun....



            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
             

             
          • epereira@swbell.net
            I am 100% Czech. Both my parents were born in Texas of Czech born parents. I think that all the things you mentioned are true. The most important thing to me
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 11, 2000
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              I am 100% Czech. Both my parents were born in Texas of Czech born parents. I think that all the things you mentioned
              are true. The most important thing to me or you might say what other people notice about Czechs are character, love of
              family, deep convictions, love a party, love to eat, strong ties to their community and so on and so on.
              I personally think the most important thing to me is not one thing but several. The love of family and community. Have you
              ever noticed how Czechs rally together if someone is in need. They don't have to be family either. They work hard and share what they have. They have a respect for others and their feelings. Now a Czech can have his spat with family or friends but
              they tend to get over it. It reminds me of a personal thing that happened this weekend. Their is a funeral in our family and when my mom mentioned she had called a cousin-in-law who has been mean to her sister-in-law, I just said oh you called her too?
              It was a question, not a statement but my mom answered "We overlook others faults just as they should overlook ours, family should always do this". Now, isn't that the truth. Have you heard of any drive by Czech shootings? What about the Czech gangs wearing their colors? That's right we aren't like that. Sorry for rambling but those are my thoughts for the day...Lois Petter Pereira

              "Kotrla RJ (Richard)" wrote:

               

              Here in Texas City, Texas, USA, it's 10:30 p.m., and most sane people are asleep.

              However, there are some of us awake, and yes, even at work.

              I currently work inside a petrochemical plant, manning phones and a computer, and this time of the night, it's quiet, (for now), and it gives me a chance to reflect on many things, including my Czech heritage. I am, like a lot of you, one of the lucky ones who are 100 percent Czech.  But at the same time, I consider anyone who has .0000000000001 percent Czech blood in them to be Czech, or perhaps were blessed to have married a Czech, which makes them Czech, too.  At least, according to my thinking, that is.  So, I wonder, what is the one single thing that makes us proud to be Czech.  For most of us, there are a thousand reasons.  But if you could only name one reason, and that's what I am asking for as a topic of discussion, what would that be?

              For me, it would be the values/character traits that were instilled in by parents, and perhaps were actually genetically passed on. I am thinking of the things like the importance of family and friends; the willingness to share your last penny with another, particular another Czech; honesty, being willing to work hard and for long hours; and best of all, the ability to have fun....



              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
               
               

            • epereira@swbell.net
              I too have German in the family but one thing you mentioned was your grandfather and I have a question. My grandfather was the love of my life. He was bigger
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 11, 2000
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                I too have German in the family but one thing you mentioned was your grandfather and I have a question. My grandfather
                was the love of my life. He was bigger than life itself. One thing I noticed growing up was the way my mother and he
                interacted versus the way I did. There was always something he and I were doing together. He would actually get in the
                dirt with me and play. He would sit on the back porch and whittle things for me. He would tell me stories and basically get
                in Grandma's hair. He loved to Hoorah her. My mother had a great respect for him but it was always standoffish. Not that
                she didn't love him or he her but it was totally different from my relationship. When I asked her once if she liked him she
                was indignant and told me of course and why would I be such a hlupan. When I persisted she said the way she was raised
                was totally different than the way I way therefore Grandpa could relate to me in a different and better way. When she grew
                up the men ate first and then the women and children ate. This was a carryover from their days in Cz. The man was the head
                of the household and given the respect due him. The children cuddled with him at bedtime when he told them stories but it
                wasn't the same way I grew up. We could have that close time all the time.
                Now my question is... Has anyone else noticed this or is it just something that I experienced? The women seemed to be
                very comfortable among each other but when a man entered they tended to tone down and act differently. Could this be
                a form of respect that they were taught as youngsters and this gal never learned the lesson? I am curious. Lois Petter Pereira
                danbea@... wrote:
                 I am one of the silent ones and my heritage is 25% Czech and 75% German.  I gather a lot of information about Czech heritage from you good folks who have so much to share and which I appreciate so much.  Keep up the good work.

                My Czech grandfather, Frank Martinak, the son of John Martinak and Christina Supak, from the Colorado, Fayette, Austin County area of Texas, was also very fluent in German and therefore my knowledge of the Czech people and their culture is of really great benefit to me.  The cultures have similar characteristics but my Czech grandfather had a BIG heart and was a FUN-loving person, which in my family, was the noticeable difference in the two cultures.

                The stories of the heritage are of special interest to me.  Thanks for being there!

                Bea Rost, La Grange, Texas

                Kotrla RJ (Richard) wrote:

                 

                Here in Texas City, Texas, USA, it's 10:30 p.m., and most sane people are asleep.

                However, there are some of us awake, and yes, even at work.

                I currently work inside a petrochemical plant, manning phones and a computer, and this time of the night, it's quiet, (for now), and it gives me a chance to reflect on many things, including my Czech heritage. I am, like a lot of you, one of the lucky ones who are 100 percent Czech.  But at the same time, I consider anyone who has .0000000000001 percent Czech blood in them to be Czech, or perhaps were blessed to have married a Czech, which makes them Czech, too.  At least, according to my thinking, that is.  So, I wonder, what is the one single thing that makes us proud to be Czech.  For most of us, there are a thousand reasons.  But if you could only name one reason, and that's what I am asking for as a topic of discussion, what would that be?

                For me, it would be the values/character traits that were instilled in by parents, and perhaps were actually genetically passed on. I am thinking of the things like the importance of family and friends; the willingness to share your last penny with another, particular another Czech; honesty, being willing to work hard and for long hours; and best of all, the ability to have fun....



                To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                 

              • G. Martisek
                As a young girl, I remember family gatherings at my grandmother s and aunts/uncles to be fun times. It seems that we went there almost every weekend, but I am
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 11, 2000
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                  As a young girl, I remember family gatherings at my grandmother's and aunts/uncles to be fun times.  It seems that we went there almost every weekend, but I am sure that it was not quite that often.  But for sure every holiday and many weekends for weddings, parish celebrations,  Fireman's Frolics, and KJZT activities.

                  I too remember that the men ate first and then the women ate later.  I especially felt grown up whenever there might be a vacant chair in the first group with the men and I would get to eat before the others.  It never ceased to amaze me that there was always plenty of food left for the ladies and it never seemed to  be cold.

                  Before and after the meal there was always plenty of domino games to be played.  Forty-two and moon.  I learned very young how to play just by watching the adults play.  Sometimes I would get to play a  few hands when someone would take a time out.

                  I also remember that at the Catholic Church that my grandparents went to in Wallis (Guardian Angel)--it's often on the list of the "Painted Churches" that many visit-- the women tended to sit in the front pews and the men would sit on the back rows.  Not sure why--.  This did not happen in my hometown, but then it was not Czech either.
                   
                   

                  Lot's of good memories.

                  epereira@... wrote:

                  I too have German in the family but one thing you mentioned was your grandfather and I have a question. My grandfather
                  was the love of my life. He was bigger than life itself. One thing I noticed growing up was the way my mother and he
                  interacted versus the way I did. There was always something he and I were doing together. He would actually get in the
                  dirt with me and play. He would sit on the back porch and whittle things for me. He would tell me stories and basically get
                  in Grandma's hair. He loved to Hoorah her. My mother had a great respect for him but it was always standoffish. Not that
                  she didn't love him or he her but it was totally different from my relationship. When I asked her once if she liked him she
                  was indignant and told me of course and why would I be such a hlupan. When I persisted she said the way she was raised
                  was totally different than the way I way therefore Grandpa could relate to me in a different and better way. When she grew
                  up the men ate first and then the women and children ate. This was a carryover from their days in Cz. The man was the head
                  of the household and given the respect due him. The children cuddled with him at bedtime when he told them stories but it
                  wasn't the same way I grew up. We could have that close time all the time.
                  Now my question is... Has anyone else noticed this or is it just something that I experienced? The women seemed to be
                  very comfortable among each other but when a man entered they tended to tone down and act differently. Could this be
                  a form of respect that they were taught as youngsters and this gal never learned the lesson? I am curious. Lois Petter Pereira
                  danbea@... wrote:
                   I am one of the silent ones and my heritage is 25% Czech and 75% German.  I gather a lot of information about Czech heritage from you good folks who have so much to share and which I appreciate so much.  Keep up the good work.

                  My Czech grandfather, Frank Martinak, the son of John Martinak and Christina Supak, from the Colorado, Fayette, Austin County area of Texas, was also very fluent in German and therefore my knowledge of the Czech people and their culture is of really great benefit to me.  The cultures have similar characteristics but my Czech grandfather had a BIG heart and was a FUN-loving person, which in my family, was the noticeable difference in the two cultures.

                  The stories of the heritage are of special interest to me.  Thanks for being there!

                  Bea Rost, La Grange, Texas

                  Kotrla RJ (Richard) wrote:

                   

                  Here in Texas City, Texas, USA, it's 10:30 p.m., and most sane people are asleep.

                  However, there are some of us awake, and yes, even at work.

                  I currently work inside a petrochemical plant, manning phones and a computer, and this time of the night, it's quiet, (for now), and it gives me a chance to reflect on many things, including my Czech heritage. I am, like a lot of you, one of the lucky ones who are 100 percent Czech.  But at the same time, I consider anyone who has .0000000000001 percent Czech blood in them to be Czech, or perhaps were blessed to have married a Czech, which makes them Czech, too.  At least, according to my thinking, that is.  So, I wonder, what is the one single thing that makes us proud to be Czech.  For most of us, there are a thousand reasons.  But if you could only name one reason, and that's what I am asking for as a topic of discussion, what would that be?

                  For me, it would be the values/character traits that were instilled in by parents, and perhaps were actually genetically passed on. I am thinking of the things like the importance of family and friends; the willingness to share your last penny with another, particular another Czech; honesty, being willing to work hard and for long hours; and best of all, the ability to have fun....



                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                   



                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                   
                   
                • Kotrla RJ (Richard)
                  I think it s so great that so many of you have already rsponded to the the idea of sharingf the one or two things that makes us proud to be Czech, either 100
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 12, 2000
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                    RE: [TexasCzechs] Topics Of Discussion

                    I think it's so great that so many of you have already rsponded to the the idea of sharingf the one or two things that makes us proud to be Czech, either 100 percent or .00000001 percent.  Please keep this going.   And I agree,  two of the things most brought up in our recollections is that we are a people that works hard, and plays hard.  And has fun at whatever we do.

                    Richard

                      ----------
                      From:  danbea@... [SMTP:danbea@...]
                      Sent:  Sunday, June 11, 2000 9:10 AM
                      To:  texasczechs@egroups.com
                      Subject:  Re: [TexasCzechs] Topics Of Discussion

                      I am one of the silent ones and my heritage is 25% Czech and 75%
                      German.  I gather a lot of information about Czech heritage from you
                      good folks who have so much to share and which I appreciate so much.
                      Keep up the good work.

                      My Czech grandfather, Frank Martinak, the son of John Martinak and
                      Christina Supak, from the Colorado, Fayette, Austin County area of
                      Texas, was also very fluent in German and therefore my knowledge of the
                      Czech people and their culture is of really great benefit to me.  The
                      cultures have similar characteristics but my Czech grandfather had a BIG
                      heart and was a FUN-loving person, which in my family, was the
                      noticeable difference in the two cultures.

                      The stories of the heritage are of special interest to me.  Thanks for
                      being there!

                      Bea Rost, La Grange, Texas

                      Kotrla RJ (Richard) wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      > Here in Texas City, Texas, USA, it's 10:30 p.m., and most sane people
                      > are asleep.
                      >
                      > However, there are some of us awake, and yes, even at work.
                      >
                      > I currently work inside a petrochemical plant, manning phones and a
                      > computer, and this time of the night, it's quiet, (for now), and it
                      > gives me a chance to reflect on many things, including my Czech
                      > heritage. I am, like a lot of you, one of the lucky ones who are 100
                      > percent Czech.  But at the same time, I consider anyone who has
                      > .0000000000001 percent Czech blood in them to be Czech, or perhaps
                      > were blessed to have married a Czech, which makes them Czech, too.  At
                      > least, according to my thinking, that is.  So, I wonder, what is the
                      > one single thing that makes us proud to be Czech.  For most of us,
                      > there are a thousand reasons.  But if you could only name one reason,
                      > and that's what I am asking for as a topic of discussion, what would
                      > that be?
                      >
                      > For me, it would be the values/character traits that were instilled in
                      > by parents, and perhaps were actually genetically passed on. I am
                      > thinking of the things like the importance of family and friends; the
                      > willingness to share your last penny with another, particular another
                      > Czech; honesty, being willing to work hard and for long hours; and
                      > best of all, the ability to have fun....
                      > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
                      >
                      > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
                      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      > texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                      >

                      <<Message: %s>>

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