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Re: [TexasCzechs] guineafowl, recipes and memories

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  • pfoster
    Hi Jana, If I have posted anything, please feel free to use it. paulasmaggie ... From: gpatrick To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, January 01,
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Jana, If I have posted anything, please feel free to use it.
      paulasmaggie
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: gpatrick
      Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2009 3:29 PM
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] guineafowl, recipes and memories

      Hi Jana,
      As for me, please feel free to include anything I have posted to the list.  Thanks for your informative posts to the list.  Your efforts are appreciated.
       
      George Patrick
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: janapivec
      Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2009 12:22 PM
      Subject: [TexasCzechs] guineafowl, recipes and memories

      I have my grandmother' s recipe for egg noodles, and yes, she kept
      guineas, and she put porcelain door knobs in her hen nests, and my
      mom confirms that she used guineas for her soup, so I really enjoyed
      the discussion of guineas around the farm.

      I am putting together a recipe/memory book for the Harris County
      Chapter of the Czech Heritage Society. We plan to have it ready for
      our SpringFest (April 19, SPJST Lodge 88, 1435 Beall Street in
      Houston). I would like permission to use some of your posted
      comments about guineas that provoked powerful memories for me.

      I would also like to invite you to contribute family recipes and the
      associated memories -- I remember the rolled-out egg noodles draped
      over a kitchen towel, drying over the back of a ladder-back chair,
      and the Bozi Milosti my Stara fixed when we came to visit. If you
      would like to share special recipes and special memories, I know that
      others in our Texas Czech community would be warmed by them.

      With all best wishes, jana pivec

      --- In TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com, sissonltd@.. . wrote:
      >
      > Oh, yes they do! Grandpa Ancinec trained his pet goat to butt
      people in the behind when they came to the town watering hole in
      Halenkovice- -this was before he came to America! Years when grandpa
      went back to visit Halenkovice, Moravia an old man remembered grandpa-
      -and it had been many years since he had seen him and the pesky
      goat. Grandpa taught that goat to especially plague that poor man--I
      guess sometimes it really is hard to forget a face! Thankfully
      grandpa did not get to bring the goat to Bell County!
      >
      > ------------ -- Original message ------------ --
      > From: "gpatrick" <GPATRICK@.. .>
      > Hi Buster,
      > I sure wish you hadn't mentioned "Banty"! I had forgotten the
      Banty rooster on my Grandma Petrek's farm in Bell County. Meanist
      piece of chicken flesh The Good Lord ever put on the face of His
      Earth. Grandma didn't have indoor plumbing and the outhouse was
      about 300 feet or so from the main house. The Banty rooster lived
      in harmony among the guinea flock, trying to disguise himself as
      one of them. His evil eyes watched the door waiting for one of us
      kids to make the mad dash for the outhouse. When we jumped off the
      poarch running he jumped from the flock, also running and flapping
      his little wings and screaming like a banchee(sp, I know). He was
      expert at landing on top of the head of his victim , grasping claws
      filled with hair, and croaking that evil croak of his.. For years I
      had bad dreams about the little devil.
      >
      > In later years, I learned that my Moravian dad and his two brothers
      had bought the little fellow for the exact purpose. They would
      pretend that they were just sitting under thegiant elm tree in the
      yard, talking and enjoying the cold beer. However, when one of us
      would head for the outhouse they would watch the ordeal with great
      pleasure. I guess I should have wondered why the little rooster
      never bothered them??? I guess Czech fellows do have to have a
      little fun ever once in a while.
      >
      > George
      > ----------
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Buster Mitchell
      > To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Wednesday, December 24, 2008 2:36 PM
      > Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Domesticated guineafowl - Wikipedia, the
      free encyclopedia
      >
      >
      > We had both guineas and peafowl... Momma always used guinea eggs
      for her noodles... they're almost solid yolk!!! We had one guinea
      hen that would always set on eggs in an old wringer washer in a tool
      shed... problem was every other "bird" on the place would lay their
      egg in there... she would spend her whole day pushing and pulling
      eggs under herself, trying to keep them all covered... that poor
      guinea would then try to ride herd on a brood consisting of guineas,
      domineckers, bantys, muscovie and mallard ducks, peafowl, and an
      occasional turkey.
      > Guineas do indeed kill (and eat) snakes... they also would eat
      ticks and red ants... the bad thing, is they also ate lizards and
      horny toads.
      > One memory I have is sitting at the table eating and my mother
      asking, "What in blazes is that pinging sound?" We finally figured
      out it was a flock of guineas pecking at the brand new "Baby Moon"
      hubcaps on my Dodge Coronet.
      >
      > Buster
      >
      > --- On Wed, 12/24/08, sissonltd@.. . <sissonltd@. ..> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: sissonltd@.. . <sissonltd@. ..>
      > Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Domesticated guineafowl - Wikipedia, the
      free encyclopedia
      > To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
      > Date: Wednesday, December 24, 2008, 1:41 PM
      >
      >
      > Seems like grandpa was pretty wise....Granny Rose Ancinec(Rose
      Dusek Ancinec) used to put porcelain doorknobs in the chicken
      nest....she would check the nests frequently and when she found the
      knob gone she would go hunt for a dead snake nearby that had wrapped
      itself around a tree to crush the "egg"....chicken snakes of course
      ate the chicken eggs...she would cut the snake open with a hatchet,
      take the knob out and clean it on her apron and put it back in the
      nest and went back to whatever she was doing. I miss her so much;
      there is so much I needed to learn from her that I never did because
      I was born and raised in Oregon and by the time I was on my own and
      lived in TX for a spell, she was already pretty up in age and a lot
      she could not remember...mother had written down much of their life
      history and experiences in book form but even mother now is losing
      her marbles slowly so time is precious.
      >
      >
      > I hope you record your memories for the future...it is SO important
      for our childrens history whether they recognize it or not.
      >
      > ------------ -- Original message ------------ --
      > From: "gpatrick" <GPATRICK@austin. rr.com>
      >
      > As much as my cousins and I liked to play in the barn we had to put
      up with the big "chicken Snake" because according to my
      grandfather the snake ate the mice and rats in the barn. But even
      though we knew he was harmless he still scared the heck out of us
      when we hid in some dark place in the barn for "Hide and Seek" and
      found the big fellow coiled up next to us! When we complained
      granddad would always do the "red and yellow kill a fellow, red and
      black venom lack" thing.
      >
      > George
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: sissonltd@comcast. net
      > To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Wednesday, December 24, 2008 12:31 PM
      > Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Domesticated guineafowl - Wikipedia, the
      free encyclopedia
      >
      >
      > George that rings a bell! Granny Anna Dusek Dusek and Granny
      Ancinec had them all over the place on their farms in Bell County--
      according to mother anyway and she would know; she grew up at Red
      Ranger. Granny Dusek would go after the guinea with a wooden spoon
      so she could get the eggs out of the nest....not sure what she did
      with the eggs though. They built nests on the ground or in bushes.
      >
      > Mother said when they found large chicken snakes they would go get
      a neighbor Fred Simek to pull them out of hiding and snap their heads
      off and then leave the heads on fence posts. This was way back in
      the 20's and 30's in Bell County.
      >
      > ------------ -- Original message ------------ --
      > From: "gpatrick" <GPATRICK@austin. rr.com>
      >
      > Hi All,
      > Does anyone remember having guineas on their grandparents farm?
      They were big in bell County. My grandmother had quite a few. They
      had several purposes. First of all, they hated snakes and killed
      everyone they ran across--either good or bad snakes didn't matter.
      The only thing that hated snakes worse was my grandmother so she and
      the guinea got along well.
      >
      > They were also "Watch Birds". If anything unusual came around the
      house they made one bad disturbance. I think they were louder and
      more threatening than they were mean?
      >
      > Now, whether or not the eggs or meat was fit to eat I don't know?
      Seems I remember seeing them around all of the farm houses?
      >
      > George
      > http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Domesticated_ guineafowl
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > No virus found in this incoming message.
      > Checked by AVG.
      > Version: 7.5.552 / Virus Database: 270.10.0/1863 - Release Date:
      12/24/2008 11:49 AM
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > No virus found in this incoming message.
      > Checked by AVG.
      > Version: 7.5.552 / Virus Database: 270.10.0/1863 - Release Date:
      12/24/2008 11:49 AM
      >


      No virus found in this incoming message.
      Checked by AVG.
      Version: 7.5.552 / Virus Database: 270.10.1/1870 - Release Date: 12/31/2008 8:44 AM

    • livanec@aol.com
      ?We also had guinea s. Mom used the eggs for egg noodles and the meat for polevka. They were our alarm system if a critter tried to get our chickens. Allen ...
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        8-) We also had guinea's. Mom used the eggs for egg noodles and the meat for polevka. They were our alarm system if a critter tried to get our chickens.

        Allen


        -----Original Message-----
        From: janapivec <jesenwei@...>
        To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, 1 Jan 2009 12:22 pm
        Subject: [TexasCzechs] guineafowl, recipes and memories

        I have my grandmother' s recipe for egg noodles, and yes, she kept
        guineas, and she put porcelain door knobs in her hen nests, and my
        mom confirms that she used guineas for her soup, so I really enjoyed
        the discussion of guineas around the farm.

        I am putting together a recipe/memory book for the Harris County
        Chapter of the Czech Heritage Society. We plan to have it ready for
        our SpringFest (April 19, SPJST Lodge 88, 1435 Beall Street in
        Houston). I would like permission to use some of your posted
        comments about guineas that provoked powerful memories for me.

        I would also like to invite you to contribute family recipes and the
        associated memories -- I remember the rolled-out egg noodles draped
        over a kitchen towel, drying over the back of a ladder-back chair,
        and the Bozi Milosti my Stara fixed when we came to visit. If you
        would like to share special recipes and special memories, I know that
        others in our Texas Czech community would be warmed by them.

        With all best wishes, jana pivec

        --- In TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com, sissonltd@.. . wrote:
        >
        > Oh, yes they do! Grandpa Ancinec trained his pet goat to butt
        people in the behind when they came to the town watering hole in
        Halenkovice- -this was before he came to America! Years when grandpa
        went back to visit Halenkovice, Moravia an old man remembered grandpa-
        -and it had been many years since he had seen him and the pesky
        goat. Grandpa taught that goat to especially plague that poor man--I
        guess sometimes it really is hard to forget a face! Thankfully
        grandpa did not get to bring the goat to Bell County!
        >
        > ------------ -- Original message ------------ --
        > From: "gpatrick" <GPATRICK@.. .>
        > Hi Buster,
        > I sure wish you hadn't mentioned "Banty"! I had forgotten the
        Banty rooster on my Grandma Petrek's farm in Bell County. Meanist
        piece of chicken flesh The Good Lord ever put on the face of His
        Earth. Grandma didn't have indoor plumbing and the outhouse was
        about 300 feet or so from the main house. The Banty rooster lived
        in harmony among the guinea flock, trying to disguise himself as
        one of them. His evil eyes watched the door waiting for one of us
        kids to make the mad dash for the outhouse. When we jumped off the
        poarch running he jumped from the flock, also running and flapping
        his little wings and screaming like a banchee(sp, I know). He was
        expert at landing on top of the head of his victim , grasping claws
        filled with hair, and croaking that evil croak of his.. For years I
        had bad dreams about the little devil.
        >
        > In later years, I learned that my Moravian dad and his two brothers
        had bought the little fellow for the exact purpose. They would
        pretend that they were just sitting under thegiant elm tree in the
        yard, talking and enjoying the cold beer. However, when one of us
        would head for the outhouse they would watch the ordeal with great
        pleasure. I guess I should have wondered why the little rooster
        never bothered them??? I guess Czech fellows do have to have a
        little fun ever once in a while.
        >
        > George
        > ----------
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Buster Mitchell
        > To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
        > Sent: Wednesday, December 24, 2008 2:36 PM
        > Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Domesticated guineafowl - Wikipedia, the
        free encyclopedia
        >
        >
        > We had both guineas and peafowl... Momma always used guinea eggs
        for her noodles... they're almost solid yolk!!! We had one guinea
        hen that would always set on eggs in an old wringer washer in a tool
        shed... problem was every other "bird" on the place would lay their
        egg in there... she would spend her whole day pushing and pulling
        eggs under herself, trying to keep them all covered... that poor
        guinea would then try to ride herd on a brood consisting of guineas,
        domineckers, bantys, muscovie and mallard ducks, peafowl, and an
        occasional turkey.
        > Guineas do indeed kill (and eat) snakes... they also would eat
        ticks and red ants... the bad thing, is they also ate lizards and
        horny toads.
        > One memory I have is sitting at the table eating and my mother
        asking, "What in blazes is that pinging sound?" We finally figured
        out it was a flock of guineas pecking at the brand new "Baby Moon"
        hubcaps on my Dodge Coronet.
        >
        > Buster
        >
        > --- On Wed, 12/24/08, sissonltd@.. . <sissonltd@. ..> wrote:
        >
        >
        > From: sissonltd@.. . <sissonltd@. ..>
        > Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Domesticated guineafowl - Wikipedia, the
        free encyclopedia
        > To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
        > Date: Wednesday, December 24, 2008, 1:41 PM
        >
        >
        > Seems like grandpa was pretty wise....Granny Rose Ancinec(Rose
        Dusek Ancinec) used to put porcelain doorknobs in the chicken
        nest....she would check the nests frequently and when she found the
        knob gone she would go hunt for a dead snake nearby that had wrapped
        itself around a tree to crush the "egg"....chicken snakes of course
        ate the chicken eggs...she would cut the snake open with a hatchet,
        take the knob out and clean it on her apron and put it back in the
        nest and went back to whatever she was doing. I miss her so much;
        there is so much I needed to learn from her that I never did because
        I was born and raised in Oregon and by the time I was on my own and
        lived in TX for a spell, she was already pretty up in age and a lot
        she could not remember...mother had written down much of their life
        history and experiences in book form but even mother now is losing
        her marbles slowly so time is precious.
        >
        >
        > I hope you record your memories for the future...it is SO important
        for our childrens history whether they recognize it or not.
        >
        > ------------ -- Original message ------------ --
        > From: "gpatrick" <GPATRICK@austin. rr.com>
        >
        > As much as my cousins and I liked to play in the barn we had to put
        up with the big "chicken Snake" because according to my
        grandfather the snake ate the mice and rats in the barn. But even
        though we knew he was harmless he still scared the heck out of us
        when we hid in some dark place in the barn for "Hide and Seek" and
        found the big fellow coiled up next to us! When we complained
        granddad would always do the "red and yellow kill a fellow, red and
        black venom lack" thing.
        >
        > George
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: sissonltd@comcast. net
        > To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
        > Sent: Wednesday, December 24, 2008 12:31 PM
        > Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Domesticated guineafowl - Wikipedia, the
        free encyclopedia
        >
        >
        > George that rings a bell! Granny Anna Dusek Dusek and Granny
        Ancinec had them all over the place on their farms in Bell County--
        according to mother anyway and she would know; she grew up at Red
        Ranger. Granny Dusek would go after the guinea with a wooden spoon
        so she could get the eggs out of the nest....not sure what she did
        with the eggs though. They built nests on the ground or in bushes.
        >
        > Mother said when they found large chicken snakes they would go get
        a neighbor Fred Simek to pull them out of hiding and snap their heads
        off and then leave the heads on fence posts. This was way back in
        the 20's and 30's in Bell County.
        >
        > ------------ -- Original message ------------ --
        > From: "gpatrick" <GPATRICK@austin. rr.com>
        >
        > Hi All,
        > Does anyone remember having guineas on their grandparents farm?
        They were big in bell County. My grandmother had quite a few. They
        had several purposes. First of all, they hated snakes and killed
        everyone they ran across--either good or bad snakes didn't matter.
        The only thing that hated snakes worse was my grandmother so she and
        the guinea got along well.
        >
        > They were also "Watch Birds". If anything unusual came around the
        house they made one bad disturbance. I think they were louder and
        more threatening than they were mean?
        >
        > Now, whether or not the eggs or meat was fit to eat I don't know?
        Seems I remember seeing them around all of the farm houses?
        >
        > George
        > http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Domesticated_ guineafowl
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > Checked by AVG.
        > Version: 7.5.552 / Virus Database: 270.10.0/1863 - Release Date:
        12/24/2008 11:49 AM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > Checked by AVG.
        > Version: 7.5.552 / Virus Database: 270.10.0/1863 - Release Date:
        12/24/2008 11:49 AM
        >

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