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Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

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  • pfoster
    Gilbert, How did they harvest corn? Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it. Now, refresh my
    Message 1 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
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      Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

      In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
       
      A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
      When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
       
      Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
       
      Gilbert
      --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
      From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
      Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
      To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

      "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
      > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

      Hi Dora,
      in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
      was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
      farmers.

      I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
      for July 23, 1948:

      "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

      "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
      La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
      by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
      Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

      "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
      Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

      What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
      pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
      April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
      Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
      cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

      Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
      petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

      ------------ -----

    • gpatrick
      Paulasmaggie, This is George. May I jump in here. My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman on a drilling rig. Guess I
      Message 2 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
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        Paulasmaggie,
        This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
         
        Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
         
        Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
         
        George
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: pfoster
        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

        Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

        In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
         
        A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
        When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
         
        Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
         
        Gilbert
        --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
        From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
        Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
        To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
        Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

        "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
        >
        > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
        > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

        Hi Dora,
        in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
        was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
        farmers.

        I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
        for July 23, 1948:

        "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

        "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
        La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
        by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
        Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

        "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
        Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

        What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
        pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
        April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
        Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
        cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

        Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
        petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

        ------------ -----


        No virus found in this incoming message.
        Checked by AVG.
        Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM
      • pfoster
        George, It sounds like you got the short end of the stick . Yes, finish the story. How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack? paulasmaggie
        Message 3 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: gpatrick
          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

          Paulasmaggie,
          This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
           
          Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
           
          Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
           
          George
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: pfoster
          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

          Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

          In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
           
          A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
          When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
           
          Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
           
          Gilbert
          --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
          From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
          Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
          To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

          "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
          > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

          Hi Dora,
          in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
          was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
          farmers.

          I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
          for July 23, 1948:

          "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

          "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
          La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
          by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
          Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

          "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
          Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

          What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
          pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
          April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
          Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
          cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

          Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
          petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

          ------------ -----


          No virus found in this incoming message.
          Checked by AVG.
          Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM

        • livanec@aol.com
          Either by hand or a manual muscle driven corn sheller or if you were rich you used a combine. I pulled many an ear of corn. I always got the down rows. Allen
          Message 4 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Either by hand or a manual muscle driven corn sheller or if you were rich you used a combine. I pulled many an ear of corn. I always got the down rows.
             
            Allen




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          • Andrea (Andi)
            My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.? You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off
            Message 5 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

              Andrea Novak



              -----Original Message-----
              From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@...>
              To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

              George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: gpatrick
              Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

              Paulasmaggie,
              This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
               
              Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
               
              Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
               
              George
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: pfoster
              Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

              Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

              In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
               
              A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
              When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
               
              Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
               
              Gilbert
              --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
              From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
              Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
              To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
              Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

              "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
              >
              > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
              > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

              Hi Dora,
              in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
              was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
              farmers.

              I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
              for July 23, 1948:

              "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

              "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
              La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
              by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
              Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

              "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
              Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

              What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
              pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
              April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
              Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
              cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

              Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
              petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

              ------------ -----


              No virus found in this incoming message.
              Checked by AVG.
              Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM
            • pfoster
              Andi, That sounds a lot safer and easier than what my Grandmamma did. She used her trusty butcher knife. paulasmaggie ... From: Andrea (Andi) To:
              Message 6 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Andi, That sounds a lot safer and easier than what my Grandmamma did.  She used her trusty butcher knife.  paulasmaggie
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 8:02 AM
                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                Andrea Novak



                -----Original Message-----
                From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: gpatrick
                Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                Paulasmaggie,
                This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                 
                Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                 
                Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                 
                George
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: pfoster
                Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                 
                A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                 
                Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                 
                Gilbert
                --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                Hi Dora,
                in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                farmers.

                I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                for July 23, 1948:

                "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                ------------ -----


                No virus found in this incoming message.
                Checked by AVG.
                Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM

              • janapivec
                My Starik also had the hand-cranked metal wheel with teeth on it, enclosed in a - I think it was a metal housing. Insert an ear, and turn the crank. The
                Message 7 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  My 'Starik' also had the hand-cranked metal wheel with teeth on it,
                  enclosed in a - I think it was a metal housing. Insert an ear, and
                  turn the crank. The teeth made the cob spin so that all the kernels
                  came off, and the cob went spinning out the other side. We kids
                  thought it was the coolest thing.

                  For pulling corn, Starik hitched up his mule, and he and I went down
                  the rows breaking the ears off the stalks and tossing them into the
                  wagon. A word from Starik and the mule would move forward until told
                  to stop.

                  He got me hooked on coffee. When we came in from the fields, we
                  would have a cup of hot coffee (makes you sweat, pores stay open so
                  you don't get overheated).

                  --- In TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com, "Andrea (Andi)" <Andikat@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the
                  ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.? You turned a handle and it
                  took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.
                  >
                  > Andrea Novak
                  >
                  >
                • Eric In The Woodlands
                  Both sets of grandparents had one of these, too. I couldn t turn it because I was too little and it took some muscle.. My cousins teased me mercilessly about
                  Message 8 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment

                    Both sets of grandparents had one of these, too… I couldn’t turn it because I was too little and it took some muscle…. My cousins teased me mercilessly about not being able to turn the crank…. Also, sometimes a stray kernel would fly up out of the mechanism and for some reason I found that very exciting and funny.

                     

                    From: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrea (Andi)
                    Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 8:03 AM
                    To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                     

                    My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                    Andrea Novak



                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@...>
                    To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                    George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie

                    ----- Original Message -----

                    From: gpatrick

                    Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM

                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                     

                    Paulasmaggie,

                    This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?

                     

                    Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.

                     

                    Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.

                     

                    George

                     

                    ----- Original Message -----

                    From: pfoster

                    Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM

                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                     

                    Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie

                    ----- Original Message -----

                    Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM

                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                     

                    In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.

                     

                    A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.

                    When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.

                     

                    Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that's also an interesting story.

                     

                    Gilbert
                    --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:

                    From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                    Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                    To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                    "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                    > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                    Hi Dora,
                    in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                    was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                    farmers.

                    I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                    for July 23, 1948:

                    "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                    "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                    La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                    by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                    Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                    "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                    Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                    What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                    pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                    April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                    Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                    cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                    Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                    petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                    ------------ -----


                    No virus found in this incoming message.
                    Checked by AVG.
                    Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM


                    Find phone numbers fast with the New AOL Yellow Pages!

                  • Mary Ann Wisian
                    I remember my Czech grandpa had one too.  We all fought over who got to do it (Tom Sawyer style ;o)  We used the corn to feed the hogs with.  Mary Ann
                    Message 9 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I remember my Czech grandpa had one too.  We all fought over who got to do it (Tom Sawyer style ;o)  We used the corn to feed the hogs with.

                       
                      Mary Ann Wisian


                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: Andrea (Andi) <Andikat@...>
                      To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 8:02:48 AM
                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                      My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                      Andrea Novak



                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                      To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                      Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                      George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: gpatrick
                      Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                      Paulasmaggie,
                      This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                       
                      Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                       
                      Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                       
                      George
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: pfoster
                      Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                      Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                      In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                       
                      A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                      When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                       
                      Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                       
                      Gilbert
                      --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                      From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                      Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                      To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                      Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                      "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                      > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                      Hi Dora,
                      in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                      was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                      farmers.

                      I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                      for July 23, 1948:

                      "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                      "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                      La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                      by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                      Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                      "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                      Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                      What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                      pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                      April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                      Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                      cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                      Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                      petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                      ------------ -----


                      No virus found in this incoming message.
                      Checked by AVG.
                      Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM
                    • Mary Ann Wisian
                      What we were referring to, if I am correct, is the dried cornon the cobs not fresh, where as the buthcher knife would be best.  Mary Ann Wisian ... From:
                      Message 10 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        What we were referring to, if I am correct, is the dried cornon the cobs not fresh, where as the buthcher knife would be best.

                         
                        Mary Ann Wisian


                        ----- Original Message ----
                        From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@...>
                        To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 8:23:45 AM
                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                        Andi, That sounds a lot safer and easier than what my Grandmamma did.  She used her trusty butcher knife.  paulasmaggie
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 8:02 AM
                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                        My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                        Andrea Novak



                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                        To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                        Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                        George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: gpatrick
                        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                        Paulasmaggie,
                        This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                         
                        Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                         
                        Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                         
                        George
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: pfoster
                        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                        Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                        In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                         
                        A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                        When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                         
                        Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                         
                        Gilbert
                        --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                        From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                        Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                        To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                        Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                        "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                        > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                        Hi Dora,
                        in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                        was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                        farmers.

                        I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                        for July 23, 1948:

                        "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                        "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                        La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                        by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                        Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                        "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                        Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                        What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                        pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                        April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                        Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                        cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                        Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                        petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                        ------------ -----


                        No virus found in this incoming message.
                        Checked by AVG.
                        Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM

                      • pfoster
                        Thank You. paulasmaggie ... From: Mary Ann Wisian To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 12:48 PM Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re:
                        Message 11 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Thank You.  paulasmaggie
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 12:48 PM
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                          What we were referring to, if I am correct, is the dried cornon the cobs not fresh, where as the buthcher knife would be best.

                           
                          Mary Ann Wisian


                          ----- Original Message ----
                          From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                          To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                          Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 8:23:45 AM
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                          Andi, That sounds a lot safer and easier than what my Grandmamma did.  She used her trusty butcher knife.  paulasmaggie
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 8:02 AM
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                          My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                          Andrea Novak



                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                          To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                          Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                          George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: gpatrick
                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                          Paulasmaggie,
                          This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                           
                          Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                           
                          Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                           
                          George
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: pfoster
                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                          Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                          In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                           
                          A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                          When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                           
                          Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                           
                          Gilbert
                          --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                          From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                          Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                          To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                          Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                          "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                          > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                          Hi Dora,
                          in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                          was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                          farmers.

                          I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                          for July 23, 1948:

                          "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                          "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                          La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                          by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                          Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                          "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                          Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                          What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                          pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                          April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                          Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                          cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                          Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                          petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                          ------------ -----


                          No virus found in this incoming message.
                          Checked by AVG.
                          Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM

                        • bmit1313@yahoo.com
                          I remember still, how proud my mother was when she received a kernel slicer from Sears & Roebuck... it was a round blade (the cob went through the middle) with
                          Message 12 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I remember still, how proud my mother was when she received a kernel slicer from Sears & Roebuck... it was a round blade (the cob went through the middle) with handles sticking out either side... she used a little Bohemian ingenuity and took an old wooden bread bowl and drove a nail through from the bottom... she could take a fresh shucked cob and slam it down on that nail and push the slicer over it in nothing flat... the bowl caught not only the kernels but the milky juice... which she not only let us drink, but she used it in a lot of her baked goods as well.
                             
                            We had an old Cub Cadet tractor... the kind that had the steering wheel and seat off set to the right... we hooked and old cotton trailer (minus the sides) behind this and set it off down the corn rows with no rider... it would pull that trailer just fast enough that all of us could pull several rows either side of it... this is how we pulled the dry corn...
                             
                            We pulled fresh corn by going through the fields and playing "hide and seek" or "tag"... you had to make it back to the back porch (and Momma) with an ear or two or you were "it"... we always had great fun at this... aahhh the memories!!!
                             
                            Buster
                          • Dora Smith
                            How large were the farms on which cotton was grown? I have known people who were share croppers. Tehy might raise ordinary farm crops at home, but then go
                            Message 13 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment
                              How large were the farms on which cotton was grown?

                              I have known people who were share croppers. Tehy might raise ordinary farm crops at home, but then go work in the owner's large farm, and that might be picking cotton.

                              Yours,
                              Dora Smith
                              Austin, TX
                              tiggernut24@...
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.