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Cotton Picking

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  • paulasmaggie
    A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table and clothes on
    Message 1 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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      A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
      way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
      and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
      Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
      did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
      Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
      pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
      Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
      old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
      get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
      boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
      remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
      long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
      girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
      few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
      would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
      up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
      were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie
    • Julie Matus
      Paula, cotton picking is/was not easy. We used to pick the cotton out of the bolls, then later we began pulling the whole open boll - neither way was too
      Message 2 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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        Paula, cotton picking is/was not easy.  We used to pick the cotton out of the bolls, then later we began pulling the whole open boll - neither way was too pleasant.  The points were very pinchy.  The gloves we wore did not prevent getting punched up.  My brother used to tell me stories while we were picking.  He also used to sing country songs.  Actually, he still does that - he had a small band when he lived in Pasadena and since they've moved to Weimar, he has performed at the Fayette Opry in La Grange a few times.  He likes to tell jokes too.  So I guess in the cotton patch, he was practicing on us!  I used to enjoy hauling hay.  Daddy would pitch the bales on the trailer and I would stack them, while Mom was driving the tractor.  We did everything as a family.  I guess that's why now we still do the same thing.  When one of us is outside doing yard/garden work, the other is too.  It's just more fun that way! 
        Julie

        Julie & Wes Matus
         
        Researching:
        Herzik, Korenek, Toman, Dybala
        Matus, Kubala, Grossman, Krenek
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 4:51 AM
        Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

        A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
        way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
        and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
        Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
        did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
        Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
        pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
        Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
        old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
        get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
        boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
        remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
        long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
        girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
        few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
        would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
        up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
        were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie

      • pfoster
        Mrs. Matus, These are the stories I copy and go into by binder for my children and grandchildren. Thank-You for sharing. paulasmaggie ... From: Julie Matus
        Message 3 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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          Mrs. Matus, These are the stories I copy and go into by binder for my children and grandchildren.  Thank-You for sharing.  paulasmaggie
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 6:56 AM
          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

          Paula, cotton picking is/was not easy.  We used to pick the cotton out of the bolls, then later we began pulling the whole open boll - neither way was too pleasant.  The points were very pinchy.  The gloves we wore did not prevent getting punched up.  My brother used to tell me stories while we were picking.  He also used to sing country songs.  Actually, he still does that - he had a small band when he lived in Pasadena and since they've moved to Weimar, he has performed at the Fayette Opry in La Grange a few times.  He likes to tell jokes too.  So I guess in the cotton patch, he was practicing on us!  I used to enjoy hauling hay.  Daddy would pitch the bales on the trailer and I would stack them, while Mom was driving the tractor.  We did everything as a family.  I guess that's why now we still do the same thing.  When one of us is outside doing yard/garden work, the other is too.  It's just more fun that way! 
          Julie

          Julie & Wes Matus
           
          Researching:
          Herzik, Korenek, Toman, Dybala
          Matus, Kubala, Grossman, Krenek
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 4:51 AM
          Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

          A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
          way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
          and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
          Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
          did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
          Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
          pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
          Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
          old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
          get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
          boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
          remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
          long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
          girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
          few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
          would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
          up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
          were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie

        • jpatrick
          Paula, you asked about folks who picked cotton. I was privilege to work in the fields one summer. I thought I wanted to make some extra money at about 12 or
          Message 4 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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            Paula, you asked about folks who picked cotton. I was "privilege" to work in the fields one summer. I thought I wanted to make some extra money at about 12 or so. Mom made me a "cotton sack" from ticking, a very tough material  like what is used to cover old cotton mattresses. She only made it half size, knowing I could not pull a larger bag. A family of Latinos from down the road was getting together a crew (mostly family) to work the fields and because my parents knew them, it was allowed. Well, to make a  long story short, I worked that summer and averaged $20 a week, a big sum to a kid of no money.:>) I was supposed to wear a big hat, gloves and shoes, but as the day progressed, I shed all the "extra" stuff. I think the most difficult part was dragging that sack to the truck to be weighed. You did learn to pluck the cotton from the boll without stabbing yourself. When the boll pulling came, some cheated a bit by putting the whole stalk in the bag, creating "dirty cotton". You were not paid as much per pound for the dried stuff as the fluffy bolls. It was very hard and taught lots of kids what hard work was. Our crew also told stories in the field and 2 cousins from San Antonio, sang as they worked, creating a cadence to work by.
            Joyce P
            ----- Original Message -----


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          • pfoster
            Joyce, First of all thank-you, this too goes into my story binder. I hope I am not overstepping the line here, but I am not sure how to take the word
            Message 5 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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              Joyce, First of all thank-you, this too goes into my story binder.  I hope I am not "overstepping the line" here, but I am not sure how to take the word "privilege".  It is a interesting choice of a word describing cotton picking,  paulasmaggie
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: jpatrick
              Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 7:30 AM
              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

              Paula, you asked about folks who picked cotton. I was "privilege" to work in the fields one summer. I thought I wanted to make some extra money at about 12 or so. Mom made me a "cotton sack" from ticking, a very tough material  like what is used to cover old cotton mattresses. She only made it half size, knowing I could not pull a larger bag. A family of Latinos from down the road was getting together a crew (mostly family) to work the fields and because my parents knew them, it was allowed. Well, to make a  long story short, I worked that summer and averaged $20 a week, a big sum to a kid of no money.:>) I was supposed to wear a big hat, gloves and shoes, but as the day progressed, I shed all the "extra" stuff. I think the most difficult part was dragging that sack to the truck to be weighed. You did learn to pluck the cotton from the boll without stabbing yourself. When the boll pulling came, some cheated a bit by putting the whole stalk in the bag, creating "dirty cotton". You were not paid as much per pound for the dried stuff as the fluffy bolls. It was very hard and taught lots of kids what hard work was. Our crew also told stories in the field and 2 cousins from San Antonio, sang as they worked, creating a cadence to work by.
              Joyce P
              ----- Original Message -----


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              Checked by AVG.
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            • Julie Matus
              You re welcome, Paula! I feel honored! Julie Julie & Wes Matus Researching: Herzik, Korenek, Toman, Dybala Matus, Kubala, Grossman, Krenek ... From: pfoster
              Message 6 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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                You're welcome, Paula! I feel honored!
                Julie

                Julie & Wes Matus
                 
                Researching:
                Herzik, Korenek, Toman, Dybala
                Matus, Kubala, Grossman, Krenek
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: pfoster
                Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 7:27 AM
                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                Mrs. Matus, These are the stories I copy and go into by binder for my children and grandchildren.  Thank-You for sharing.  paulasmaggie
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 6:56 AM
                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                Paula, cotton picking is/was not easy.  We used to pick the cotton out of the bolls, then later we began pulling the whole open boll - neither way was too pleasant.  The points were very pinchy.  The gloves we wore did not prevent getting punched up.  My brother used to tell me stories while we were picking.  He also used to sing country songs.  Actually, he still does that - he had a small band when he lived in Pasadena and since they've moved to Weimar, he has performed at the Fayette Opry in La Grange a few times.  He likes to tell jokes too.  So I guess in the cotton patch, he was practicing on us!  I used to enjoy hauling hay.  Daddy would pitch the bales on the trailer and I would stack them, while Mom was driving the tractor.  We did everything as a family.  I guess that's why now we still do the same thing.  When one of us is outside doing yard/garden work, the other is too.  It's just more fun that way! 
                Julie

                Julie & Wes Matus
                 
                Researching:
                Herzik, Korenek, Toman, Dybala
                Matus, Kubala, Grossman, Krenek
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 4:51 AM
                Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
                way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
                and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
                Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
                did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
                Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
                pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
                Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
                old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
                get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
                boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
                remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
                long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
                girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
                few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
                would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
                up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
                were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie

              • shirley chandler
                 I am an American born and raised and yes we /I picked cotton.I picked cotton from the time I was big enough to pull a sack,started out with a toe sack as
                Message 7 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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                   I am an American born and raised and yes we /I picked cotton.I picked cotton from the time I was big enough to pull a sack,started out with a "toe sack" as my mother called it then advanced to a larger cotton sack.I picked cotton along side of my mother till 1963 when I was 16.They had already invented the mechanical cotton picker but there were still places in Texas that didn't use them at that time.Sometimes we picked the cotton off of the ground that the machines missed or spilled. I guess you could say I liked it but soon found out there was other jobs that paid more for laborers,and they stopped letting children work in the fields along with their parents.We had to go to school during the day or the parents went to jail. So many memories of my childhood include picking cotton with my mother.

                • robbie moore
                  How about pulling cotton?? We got .25 for allowance per week as a child. I complained to Dad that we should get more money. In response, he took us up to my
                  Message 8 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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                    How about pulling cotton??

                    We got .25 for allowance per week as a child. I complained to Dad that we should get more money. In response, he took us up to my Granny's farm and told us to pull cotton for that whole row! Wow! It looked a mile long. You couldn't pick the bolls, you had to pull the cotton out of the bolls. Of course, there were lots of worms and bugs. Did I mention it was JULY???

                    That taught us the value of money all right, but it did more. Later, as an adult when I would talk to school people about growing up, some would disregard me because I was a "town girl". When I shared my cotton field work, I had new credibility with them.



                    ----- Original Message ----
                    From: paulasmaggie <pfosterbmt@...>
                    To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 4:51:36 AM
                    Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                    A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
                    way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
                    and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
                    Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
                    did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
                    Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
                    pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
                    Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
                    old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
                    get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
                    boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
                    remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
                    long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
                    girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
                    few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
                    would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
                    up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
                    were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie


                  • JANET TUCKER
                    My dad was Czech but my mom wasn t. However, all the cotton picking stories were from my mom s side. She grew up in Oklahoma and she would tell me of
                    Message 9 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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                      My dad was Czech but my mom wasn't. However, all the 'cotton picking'
                      stories were from my mom's side. She grew up in Oklahoma and she would tell
                      me of picking cotton. She would tell me about how it hurt and how my
                      grandmother would put the babies in the shade, while my grandmother picked
                      cotton.

                      It raises many questions about my dad's side. My dad was born in LaGrange
                      but later moved to Houston. They are in the 1910 census in LaGrange. My
                      grandfather was a blacksmith. In 1920, they were in Houston. That brings
                      up the question of whether my Grandmother (Baron, Ewald, Malinak) ever
                      worked on a farm but I don't think that she did.

                      So, to answer your question, in this instance it was the American children
                      who picked cotton.
                      Jan
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "paulasmaggie" <pfosterbmt@...>
                      To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 5:51 AM
                      Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking


                      >A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
                      > way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
                      > and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
                      > Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
                      > did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
                      > Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
                      > pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
                      > Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
                      > old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
                      > get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
                      > boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
                      > remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
                      > long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
                      > girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
                      > few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
                      > would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
                      > up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
                      > were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > Remember: You can alway set your account to Digest Mode for less mail.
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Dora Smith
                      Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else s? You pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop. Yours, Dora Smith Austin, TX
                      Message 10 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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                        Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's?  You pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.
                         
                        Yours,
                        Dora Smith
                        Austin, TX
                        tiggernut24@...
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 10:41 PM
                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                        My dad was Czech but my mom wasn't. However, all the 'cotton picking'
                        stories were from my mom's side. She grew up in Oklahoma and she would tell
                        me of picking cotton. She would tell me about how it hurt and how my
                        grandmother would put the babies in the shade, while my grandmother picked
                        cotton.

                        It raises many questions about my dad's side. My dad was born in LaGrange
                        but later moved to Houston. They are in the 1910 census in LaGrange. My
                        grandfather was a blacksmith. In 1920, they were in Houston. That brings
                        up the question of whether my Grandmother (Baron, Ewald, Malinak) ever
                        worked on a farm but I don't think that she did.

                        So, to answer your question, in this instance it was the American children
                        who picked cotton.
                        Jan
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "paulasmaggie" <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                        To: <TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com>
                        Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 5:51 AM
                        Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                        >A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
                        > way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
                        > and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
                        > Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
                        > did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
                        > Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
                        > pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
                        > Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
                        > old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
                        > get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
                        > boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
                        > remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
                        > long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
                        > girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
                        > few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
                        > would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
                        > up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
                        > were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                        >
                        > Remember: You can alway set your account to Digest Mode for less mail.
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >

                      • d1jezek@aol.com
                        my dad and lots of other people i knew around his age use the words cotton picking as a kind of swear word. In a message dated 9/29/2008 10:44:46 P.M.
                        Message 11 of 29 , Sep 29, 2008
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                          my dad and lots of other people i knew around his age use the words 'cotton picking' as a kind of swear word.
                           
                          In a message dated 9/29/2008 10:44:46 P.M. Central Daylight Time, jdtuc@... writes:
                          My dad was Czech but my mom wasn't.  However, all the 'cotton picking'
                          stories were from my mom's side.  She grew up in Oklahoma and she would tell
                          me of picking cotton.  She would tell me about how it hurt and how my
                          grandmother would put the babies in the shade, while my grandmother picked
                          cotton.

                          It raises many questions about my dad's side.  My dad was born in LaGrange
                          but later moved to Houston.  They are in the 1910 census in LaGrange.  My
                          grandfather was a blacksmith.   In 1920, they were in Houston.  That brings
                          up the question of whether my Grandmother (Baron, Ewald, Malinak) ever
                          worked on a farm but I don't think that she did.

                          So, to answer your question, in this instance it was the American children
                          who picked cotton.
                          Jan
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "paulasmaggie" <pfosterbmt@...>
                          To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 5:51 AM
                          Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking


                          >A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking.  It was the
                          > way of life and livelihood for our families.  It put food on the table
                          > and clothes on their backs.  It was for a lot their only means of money.
                          > Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
                          > did the American children too?  According to the book We're Czechs, the
                          > Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton.  Did I ever
                          > pick cotton?  One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
                          > Poppa I asked him, was it hard?  Poppa spoke few words.  He stopped the
                          > old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
                          > get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick.  He picked one
                          > boll and I picked several.  Let me tell you, I still to this day
                          > remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands.  It did not take
                          > long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
                          > girl that picking cotton was not fun.  When we got home Poppa put those
                          > few bolls above the radio.  Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
                          > would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
                          > up.  All she had to do was look above the radio.  No, the cotton bolls
                          > were long gone, but the message was still there.  paulasmaggie
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
                          > Remember: You can alway set your account to Digest Mode for less mail.
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >


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                        • pfoster
                          Dora, In the South Cotton was King in the Civil War Period. Texas had only a handful of plantations. If you ask me this question I would say cotton was what
                          Message 12 of 29 , Sep 30, 2008
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                            Dora, In the South Cotton was King in the Civil War Period.  Texas had only a handful of plantations.  If you ask me this question I would say cotton was what put food and clothes on the backs of many of our families after they immigrated.  Where I grew-up in Burleson/Lee County it was your main crop besides milo.  The Brazos Bottom was one of the biggest producers in the Area.  Your family life was based on the Cotton Season.  Cotton Season included (anyone please correct me here if I am wrong) plowing, planting, weeding, and pickin.  All family members usually pick the cotton from the time the little one could drag a bag.  Your school days were based on Cotton Pickin.  What I have found interesting in researching with Pat, was the number of babies born in between Cotton Season.  My Poppa was a sharecropper which he did not own the land, just pick the cotton.  If I remember right a portion went to the landowner as rent and the rest was used to support your family.  My Grandmamma along with their children picked the cotton.  In otherwords Poppa and Grandmamma's families the majority were sharecroppers.  So, I say with pride I am a sharecroppers Granddaughter.  paulasmaggie
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 10:48 PM
                            Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                            Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's?  You pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.
                             
                            Yours,
                            Dora Smith
                            Austin, TX
                            tiggernut24@ yahoo.com
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 10:41 PM
                            Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                            My dad was Czech but my mom wasn't. However, all the 'cotton picking'
                            stories were from my mom's side. She grew up in Oklahoma and she would tell
                            me of picking cotton. She would tell me about how it hurt and how my
                            grandmother would put the babies in the shade, while my grandmother picked
                            cotton.

                            It raises many questions about my dad's side. My dad was born in LaGrange
                            but later moved to Houston. They are in the 1910 census in LaGrange. My
                            grandfather was a blacksmith. In 1920, they were in Houston. That brings
                            up the question of whether my Grandmother (Baron, Ewald, Malinak) ever
                            worked on a farm but I don't think that she did.

                            So, to answer your question, in this instance it was the American children
                            who picked cotton.
                            Jan
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: "paulasmaggie" <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                            To: <TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com>
                            Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 5:51 AM
                            Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                            >A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
                            > way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
                            > and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
                            > Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
                            > did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
                            > Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
                            > pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
                            > Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
                            > old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
                            > get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
                            > boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
                            > remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
                            > long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
                            > girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
                            > few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
                            > would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
                            > up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
                            > were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie
                            >
                            >
                            > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                            >
                            > Remember: You can alway set your account to Digest Mode for less mail.
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >

                          • pfoster
                            After I quite laughing, I had to email. Your Dad sounded like a lot like my Poppa. Instead of a lecturing, they made their point in other ways that stuck
                            Message 13 of 29 , Sep 30, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment
                              After I quite laughing, I had to email.  Your Dad sounded like a lot like my Poppa.  Instead of a lecturing, they made their point in other ways that stuck better in our minds.  I bet you did not say anything else after that on allowances.  Thank-You for sharing.  paulasmaggie
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 7:36 PM
                              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                              How about pulling cotton??

                              We got .25 for allowance per week as a child. I complained to Dad that we should get more money. In response, he took us up to my Granny's farm and told us to pull cotton for that whole row! Wow! It looked a mile long. You couldn't pick the bolls, you had to pull the cotton out of the bolls. Of course, there were lots of worms and bugs. Did I mention it was JULY???

                              That taught us the value of money all right, but it did more. Later, as an adult when I would talk to school people about growing up, some would disregard me because I was a "town girl". When I shared my cotton field work, I had new credibility with them.



                              ----- Original Message ----
                              From: paulasmaggie <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                              To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                              Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 4:51:36 AM
                              Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                              A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
                              way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
                              and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
                              Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
                              did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
                              Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
                              pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
                              Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
                              old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
                              get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
                              boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
                              remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
                              long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
                              girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
                              few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
                              would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
                              up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
                              were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie


                            • pfoster
                              Jan, If you email me your Grandfather name birth along with your fathers I could check Ancestry. This should answer the question. I do have one question on
                              Message 14 of 29 , Sep 30, 2008
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Jan, If you email me your Grandfather name birth along with your fathers I could check Ancestry.  This should answer the question.  I do have one question on your Mother Side.  Her Cotton Pickin days were they before the Depression or during the Depression?  paulasmaggie
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 10:41 PM
                                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                                My dad was Czech but my mom wasn't. However, all the 'cotton picking'
                                stories were from my mom's side. She grew up in Oklahoma and she would tell
                                me of picking cotton. She would tell me about how it hurt and how my
                                grandmother would put the babies in the shade, while my grandmother picked
                                cotton.

                                It raises many questions about my dad's side. My dad was born in LaGrange
                                but later moved to Houston. They are in the 1910 census in LaGrange. My
                                grandfather was a blacksmith. In 1920, they were in Houston. That brings
                                up the question of whether my Grandmother (Baron, Ewald, Malinak) ever
                                worked on a farm but I don't think that she did.

                                So, to answer your question, in this instance it was the American children
                                who picked cotton.
                                Jan
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: "paulasmaggie" <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                                To: <TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com>
                                Sent: Monday, September 29, 2008 5:51 AM
                                Subject: [TexasCzechs] Cotton Picking

                                >A lot of us grew-up hearing the stories of Cotton Picking. It was the
                                > way of life and livelihood for our families. It put food on the table
                                > and clothes on their backs. It was for a lot their only means of money.
                                > Question is did only the Czech/Moravians children picked the cotton or
                                > did the American children too? According to the book We're Czechs, the
                                > Czech/Moravians were better at planting and picking cotton. Did I ever
                                > pick cotton? One time, driving by a cotton field as a child with my
                                > Poppa I asked him, was it hard? Poppa spoke few words. He stopped the
                                > old ford truck, got out, of course I followed (curiosity has known to
                                > get me in trouble), and asked him to show how to pick. He picked one
                                > boll and I picked several. Let me tell you, I still to this day
                                > remember the pricking of cotton bolls on my hands. It did not take
                                > long on that hot summer day in the Brazos Bottom to teach this little
                                > girl that picking cotton was not fun. When we got home Poppa put those
                                > few bolls above the radio. Grandmamma would get fraustrated when I
                                > would come home complaining about my job and single life after I grew-
                                > up. All she had to do was look above the radio. No, the cotton bolls
                                > were long gone, but the message was still there. paulasmaggie
                                >
                                >
                                > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                                >
                                > Remember: You can alway set your account to Digest Mode for less mail.
                                >
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >

                              • s_tb
                                ... Hi Dora, in Faytette county, where my mother s parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant farmers.
                                Message 15 of 29 , Sep 30, 2008
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                  > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                  Hi Dora,
                                  in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                  was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                  farmers.

                                  I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                  for July 23, 1948:

                                  "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                  "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                  La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                  by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                  Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                  "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                  Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                  What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                  pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                  April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                  Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                  cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                  Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                  petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                  -----------------
                                • Gilbert Bohuslav
                                  In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Sep 30, 2008
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                                     
                                    A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                                    When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                                     
                                    Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that's also an interesting story.
                                     
                                    Gilbert
                                    --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                                    From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                    Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                    To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                    "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                    > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                    Hi Dora,
                                    in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                    was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                    farmers.

                                    I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                    for July 23, 1948:

                                    "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                    "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                    La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                    by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                    Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                    "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                    Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                    What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                    pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                    April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                    Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                    cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                    Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                    petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                    ------------ -----

                                  • pfoster
                                    Gilbert, How did they harvest corn? Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it. Now, refresh my
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                      In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                                       
                                      A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                                      When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                                       
                                      Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                                       
                                      Gilbert
                                      --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                                      From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                      Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                      To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                      Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                      "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                      > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                      Hi Dora,
                                      in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                      was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                      farmers.

                                      I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                      for July 23, 1948:

                                      "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                      "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                      La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                      by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                      Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                      "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                      Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                      What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                      pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                      April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                      Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                      cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                      Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                      petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                      ------------ -----

                                    • gpatrick
                                      Paulasmaggie, This is George. May I jump in here. My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman on a drilling rig. Guess I
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        Paulasmaggie,
                                        This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                                         
                                        Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                                         
                                        Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                                         
                                        George
                                         
                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        From: pfoster
                                        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                        Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                        In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                                         
                                        A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                                        When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                                         
                                        Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                                         
                                        Gilbert
                                        --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                                        From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                        Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                        To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                        Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                        "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                        > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                        Hi Dora,
                                        in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                        was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                        farmers.

                                        I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                        for July 23, 1948:

                                        "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                        "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                        La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                        by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                        Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                        "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                        Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                        What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                        pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                        April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                        Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                        cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                        Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                        petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                        ------------ -----


                                        No virus found in this incoming message.
                                        Checked by AVG.
                                        Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM
                                      • pfoster
                                        George, It sounds like you got the short end of the stick . Yes, finish the story. How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack? paulasmaggie
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          From: gpatrick
                                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                          Paulasmaggie,
                                          This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                                           
                                          Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                                           
                                          Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                                           
                                          George
                                           
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          From: pfoster
                                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                          Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                          In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                                           
                                          A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                                          When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                                           
                                          Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                                           
                                          Gilbert
                                          --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                                          From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                          Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                          To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                          Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                          "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                          > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                          Hi Dora,
                                          in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                          was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                          farmers.

                                          I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                          for July 23, 1948:

                                          "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                          "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                          La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                          by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                          Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                          "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                          Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                          What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                          pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                          April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                          Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                          cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                          Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                          petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                          ------------ -----


                                          No virus found in this incoming message.
                                          Checked by AVG.
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                                        • livanec@aol.com
                                          Either by hand or a manual muscle driven corn sheller or if you were rich you used a combine. I pulled many an ear of corn. I always got the down rows. Allen
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            Either by hand or a manual muscle driven corn sheller or if you were rich you used a combine. I pulled many an ear of corn. I always got the down rows.
                                             
                                            Allen




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                                          • Andrea (Andi)
                                            My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.? You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                                              Andrea Novak



                                              -----Original Message-----
                                              From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@...>
                                              To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                                              Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                                              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                              George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                                              ----- Original Message -----
                                              From: gpatrick
                                              Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                                              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                              Paulasmaggie,
                                              This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                                               
                                              Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                                               
                                              Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                                               
                                              George
                                               
                                              ----- Original Message -----
                                              From: pfoster
                                              Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                                              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                              Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                                              ----- Original Message -----
                                              Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                                              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                              In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                                               
                                              A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                                              When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                                               
                                              Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                                               
                                              Gilbert
                                              --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                                              From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                              Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                              To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                              Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                              "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                              > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                              Hi Dora,
                                              in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                              was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                              farmers.

                                              I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                              for July 23, 1948:

                                              "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                              "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                              La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                              by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                              Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                              "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                              Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                              What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                              pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                              April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                              Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                              cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                              Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                              petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                              ------------ -----


                                              No virus found in this incoming message.
                                              Checked by AVG.
                                              Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM
                                            • pfoster
                                              Andi, That sounds a lot safer and easier than what my Grandmamma did. She used her trusty butcher knife. paulasmaggie ... From: Andrea (Andi) To:
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                Andi, That sounds a lot safer and easier than what my Grandmamma did.  She used her trusty butcher knife.  paulasmaggie
                                                ----- Original Message -----
                                                Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 8:02 AM
                                                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                                                Andrea Novak



                                                -----Original Message-----
                                                From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                                                To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                                Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                                                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                                                ----- Original Message -----
                                                From: gpatrick
                                                Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                                                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                Paulasmaggie,
                                                This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                                                 
                                                Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                                                 
                                                Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                                                 
                                                George
                                                 
                                                ----- Original Message -----
                                                From: pfoster
                                                Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                                                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                                                ----- Original Message -----
                                                Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                                                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                                                 
                                                A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                                                When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                                                 
                                                Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                                                 
                                                Gilbert
                                                --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                                                From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                                Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                                To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                                Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                                "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                                > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                                Hi Dora,
                                                in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                                was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                                farmers.

                                                I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                                for July 23, 1948:

                                                "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                                "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                                La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                                by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                                Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                                "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                                Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                                What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                                pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                                April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                                Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                                cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                                Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                                petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                                ------------ -----


                                                No virus found in this incoming message.
                                                Checked by AVG.
                                                Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM

                                              • janapivec
                                                My Starik also had the hand-cranked metal wheel with teeth on it, enclosed in a - I think it was a metal housing. Insert an ear, and turn the crank. The
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  My 'Starik' also had the hand-cranked metal wheel with teeth on it,
                                                  enclosed in a - I think it was a metal housing. Insert an ear, and
                                                  turn the crank. The teeth made the cob spin so that all the kernels
                                                  came off, and the cob went spinning out the other side. We kids
                                                  thought it was the coolest thing.

                                                  For pulling corn, Starik hitched up his mule, and he and I went down
                                                  the rows breaking the ears off the stalks and tossing them into the
                                                  wagon. A word from Starik and the mule would move forward until told
                                                  to stop.

                                                  He got me hooked on coffee. When we came in from the fields, we
                                                  would have a cup of hot coffee (makes you sweat, pores stay open so
                                                  you don't get overheated).

                                                  --- In TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com, "Andrea (Andi)" <Andikat@...>
                                                  wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the
                                                  ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.? You turned a handle and it
                                                  took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.
                                                  >
                                                  > Andrea Novak
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                • Eric In The Woodlands
                                                  Both sets of grandparents had one of these, too. I couldn t turn it because I was too little and it took some muscle.. My cousins teased me mercilessly about
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                                  • 0 Attachment

                                                    Both sets of grandparents had one of these, too… I couldn’t turn it because I was too little and it took some muscle…. My cousins teased me mercilessly about not being able to turn the crank…. Also, sometimes a stray kernel would fly up out of the mechanism and for some reason I found that very exciting and funny.

                                                     

                                                    From: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrea (Andi)
                                                    Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 8:03 AM
                                                    To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                     

                                                    My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                                                    Andrea Novak



                                                    -----Original Message-----
                                                    From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@...>
                                                    To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                                                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                    George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie

                                                    ----- Original Message -----

                                                    From: gpatrick

                                                    Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM

                                                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                     

                                                    Paulasmaggie,

                                                    This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?

                                                     

                                                    Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.

                                                     

                                                    Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.

                                                     

                                                    George

                                                     

                                                    ----- Original Message -----

                                                    From: pfoster

                                                    Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM

                                                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                     

                                                    Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie

                                                    ----- Original Message -----

                                                    Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM

                                                    Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                     

                                                    In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.

                                                     

                                                    A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.

                                                    When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.

                                                     

                                                    Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that's also an interesting story.

                                                     

                                                    Gilbert
                                                    --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:

                                                    From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                                    Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                                    To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                                    "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                                    > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                                    Hi Dora,
                                                    in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                                    was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                                    farmers.

                                                    I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                                    for July 23, 1948:

                                                    "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                                    "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                                    La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                                    by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                                    Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                                    "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                                    Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                                    What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                                    pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                                    April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                                    Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                                    cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                                    Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                                    petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                                    ------------ -----


                                                    No virus found in this incoming message.
                                                    Checked by AVG.
                                                    Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM


                                                    Find phone numbers fast with the New AOL Yellow Pages!

                                                  • Mary Ann Wisian
                                                    I remember my Czech grandpa had one too.  We all fought over who got to do it (Tom Sawyer style ;o)  We used the corn to feed the hogs with.  Mary Ann
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      I remember my Czech grandpa had one too.  We all fought over who got to do it (Tom Sawyer style ;o)  We used the corn to feed the hogs with.

                                                       
                                                      Mary Ann Wisian


                                                      ----- Original Message ----
                                                      From: Andrea (Andi) <Andikat@...>
                                                      To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                                                      Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 8:02:48 AM
                                                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                      My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                                                      Andrea Novak



                                                      -----Original Message-----
                                                      From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                                                      To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                                      Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                                                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                      George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                                      From: gpatrick
                                                      Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                                                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                      Paulasmaggie,
                                                      This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                                                       
                                                      Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                                                       
                                                      Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                                                       
                                                      George
                                                       
                                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                                      From: pfoster
                                                      Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                                                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                      Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                                      Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                                                      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                      In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                                                       
                                                      A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                                                      When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                                                       
                                                      Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                                                       
                                                      Gilbert
                                                      --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                                                      From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                                      Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                                      To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                                      Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                                      "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                                      > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                                      Hi Dora,
                                                      in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                                      was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                                      farmers.

                                                      I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                                      for July 23, 1948:

                                                      "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                                      "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                                      La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                                      by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                                      Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                                      "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                                      Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                                      What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                                      pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                                      April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                                      Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                                      cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                                      Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                                      petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                                      ------------ -----


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                                                    • Mary Ann Wisian
                                                      What we were referring to, if I am correct, is the dried cornon the cobs not fresh, where as the buthcher knife would be best.  Mary Ann Wisian ... From:
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                                      • 0 Attachment
                                                        What we were referring to, if I am correct, is the dried cornon the cobs not fresh, where as the buthcher knife would be best.

                                                         
                                                        Mary Ann Wisian


                                                        ----- Original Message ----
                                                        From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@...>
                                                        To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                                                        Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 8:23:45 AM
                                                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                        Andi, That sounds a lot safer and easier than what my Grandmamma did.  She used her trusty butcher knife.  paulasmaggie
                                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                                        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 8:02 AM
                                                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                        My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                                                        Andrea Novak



                                                        -----Original Message-----
                                                        From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                                                        To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                                        Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                                                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                        George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                                        From: gpatrick
                                                        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                                                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                        Paulasmaggie,
                                                        This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                                                         
                                                        Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                                                         
                                                        Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                                                         
                                                        George
                                                         
                                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                                        From: pfoster
                                                        Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                                                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                        Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                                        Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                                                        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                        In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                                                         
                                                        A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                                                        When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                                                         
                                                        Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                                                         
                                                        Gilbert
                                                        --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                                                        From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                                        Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                                        To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                                        Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                                        "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                                        > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                                        Hi Dora,
                                                        in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                                        was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                                        farmers.

                                                        I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                                        for July 23, 1948:

                                                        "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                                        "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                                        La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                                        by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                                        Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                                        "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                                        Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                                        What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                                        pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                                        April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                                        Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                                        cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                                        Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                                        petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                                        ------------ -----


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                                                        Checked by AVG.
                                                        Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM

                                                      • pfoster
                                                        Thank You. paulasmaggie ... From: Mary Ann Wisian To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 12:48 PM Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re:
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                                        • 0 Attachment
                                                          Thank You.  paulasmaggie
                                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 12:48 PM
                                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                          What we were referring to, if I am correct, is the dried cornon the cobs not fresh, where as the buthcher knife would be best.

                                                           
                                                          Mary Ann Wisian


                                                          ----- Original Message ----
                                                          From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                                                          To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                                          Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2008 8:23:45 AM
                                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                          Andi, That sounds a lot safer and easier than what my Grandmamma did.  She used her trusty butcher knife.  paulasmaggie
                                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 8:02 AM
                                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                          My German grandpa had this thing (wood & metal) that you fed the ears of corn (minus the shucks) into.  You turned a handle and it took the dried kernels off the cob nice and neat.

                                                          Andrea Novak



                                                          -----Original Message-----
                                                          From: pfoster <pfosterbmt@sbcgloba l.net>
                                                          To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                                          Sent: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 6:58 am
                                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                          George, It sounds like you got the "short end of the stick".  Yes, finish the story.  How did the kernals got off of the corn into the towsack?  paulasmaggie
                                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                                          From: gpatrick
                                                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 6:52 AM
                                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                          Paulasmaggie,
                                                          This is George.  May I jump in here.  My parents finally gave up on farming and my dad took a job as a motorman  on a drilling rig.  Guess I didn't get all the farm dirt out of my system because my non-Czech  grandfather who had a farm near Port Lavaca put me to work every chance he got.  I found out later his plan was to  have me take over the farm so he could retire there.  I often wonder what would have been in store for me and my family had I taken on the 300 acres?
                                                           
                                                          Anyway, one of the task I helped him with was pulling and storing the corn.  It was a two man job.  His job was to drive the tractor pulling a  trailer while the other guy--that being me--pulled  the ears of corn from the stalks and tossed them in the trailer.  When the trailer was full we would return to the barn in which  an opening had been made so the corn could be tossed from the trailer , through the hole, and into a second-story  storage area of the barn.  Seems there was only room for one guy in the trailer--that being me--to toss the corn into the storage area.  So, while I did that he went to the house for a cup of coffee and a cigarette.  Seems to me, looking back on this, that there may well have been an inequal distribution of labor!  If I worked fast enough I had time to get a big glass of iced tea and a snack before  our next load started.
                                                           
                                                          Did anyone ever wonder how the corn kernnels  got off the cobs and into the towsack?  I know that if you want me to share.
                                                           
                                                          George
                                                           
                                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                                          From: pfoster
                                                          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 5:38 AM
                                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                          Gilbert, How did they harvest corn?  Growing-up I can remember Poppa bringing in a burlap sack of corn from the Brazos Bottom and shucking it.  Now, refresh my memory when after harvesting the corn what was left was given to the livestock?  paulasmaggie
                                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                                          Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:37 PM
                                                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking

                                                          In Fayette county cotton was never a plantation crop.  All the farms there were small with very few larger than 200/300 acres with most around 100 acres.  In addition to planting cotton, almost all farmers had corn, maize, hay and pasture land.  This gave them an opportunity to raise and supply feed for cattle, chickens, some sheep, and horses.  They needed all of these to provide food and income for the family.  As Julie mentioned some also grew sugar cane that would be cut down, stripped and sent to the person who made home-made molasses.
                                                           
                                                          A land owner who did not want to farm or could not farm his land made an agreement with someone to plant the cotton, care for it, and pick it.  The landowner provided the seed and land for planting.  The tenant was given a share of the sold cotton and so was the land owner.  In some cases the tenant just paid the land owner a price per acre.  In both cases the cotton was planted for cash.
                                                          When cotton season was over, we converted the gin to a feed mill.  Farmers would bring various products like corn tops, hay, corn, etc and grind it up and use it as feed for the livestock.  We also would take shelled corn and make corn meal for that good ole corn bread.
                                                           
                                                          Maybe some body would like to talk about how they harvested the corn---that' s also an interesting story.
                                                           
                                                          Gilbert
                                                          --- On Tue, 9/30/08, s_tb <s_tb@...> wrote:
                                                          From: s_tb <s_tb@...>
                                                          Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Cotton Picking
                                                          To: TexasCzechs@ yahoogroups. com
                                                          Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:39 PM

                                                          "Dora Smith" <tiggernut24@ ...> wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          > Were they picking cotton on their own farm, or someone else's? You
                                                          > pretty much think of cotton as a plantation crop.

                                                          Hi Dora,
                                                          in Faytette county, where my mother's parents (Ryza) farmed, cotton
                                                          was an important cash crop for the family farm, and for their tenant
                                                          farmers.

                                                          I found this article in the Weimar Mercury archives
                                                          for July 23, 1948:

                                                          "La Grange Gins First Bale of 1948 Cotton"

                                                          "Grower of the first bale was a tenant farmer, Alfred Kubecka of the
                                                          La Grange-Plum community. Grown on a Colorado river bottom farm owned
                                                          by Joe Kovar, the bale weighed 548 pounds, and was purchased by Ehlers
                                                          Cotton company for the premium price of 40 cents per pound."

                                                          "The previous earliest bale was in 1943 when Joe F Ryza of near La
                                                          Grange ginned the first bale on July 22."

                                                          What's interesting to note about this is that the average price per
                                                          pound paid farmers in 2008 has dropped from a high of 62 cents in
                                                          April 2008 to 59 cents in August 2008, according to the National
                                                          Cotton Council of America. This is just 50 percent more than
                                                          cotton sold for in 1948 - sixty years ago!

                                                          Gasoline would be selling for 22 cents/gallon today if
                                                          petroleum products were priced equivalent to cotton.

                                                          ------------ -----


                                                          No virus found in this incoming message.
                                                          Checked by AVG.
                                                          Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1698 - Release Date: 9/29/2008 7:25 PM

                                                        • bmit1313@yahoo.com
                                                          I remember still, how proud my mother was when she received a kernel slicer from Sears & Roebuck... it was a round blade (the cob went through the middle) with
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                                          • 0 Attachment
                                                            I remember still, how proud my mother was when she received a kernel slicer from Sears & Roebuck... it was a round blade (the cob went through the middle) with handles sticking out either side... she used a little Bohemian ingenuity and took an old wooden bread bowl and drove a nail through from the bottom... she could take a fresh shucked cob and slam it down on that nail and push the slicer over it in nothing flat... the bowl caught not only the kernels but the milky juice... which she not only let us drink, but she used it in a lot of her baked goods as well.
                                                             
                                                            We had an old Cub Cadet tractor... the kind that had the steering wheel and seat off set to the right... we hooked and old cotton trailer (minus the sides) behind this and set it off down the corn rows with no rider... it would pull that trailer just fast enough that all of us could pull several rows either side of it... this is how we pulled the dry corn...
                                                             
                                                            We pulled fresh corn by going through the fields and playing "hide and seek" or "tag"... you had to make it back to the back porch (and Momma) with an ear or two or you were "it"... we always had great fun at this... aahhh the memories!!!
                                                             
                                                            Buster
                                                          • Dora Smith
                                                            How large were the farms on which cotton was grown? I have known people who were share croppers. Tehy might raise ordinary farm crops at home, but then go
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Oct 1, 2008
                                                            • 0 Attachment
                                                              How large were the farms on which cotton was grown?

                                                              I have known people who were share croppers. Tehy might raise ordinary farm crops at home, but then go work in the owner's large farm, and that might be picking cotton.

                                                              Yours,
                                                              Dora Smith
                                                              Austin, TX
                                                              tiggernut24@...
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