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Re: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

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  • Claudie Swiney
    I monitor this list because I married into a Czech family from Frydek. This thread is interesting, but not limited to Czechs. One of my Scoth-Irish great
    Message 1 of 51 , Aug 8 5:43 PM
        I monitor this list because I married into a Czech family from Frydek. This thread is interesting, but not limited to Czechs. One of my Scoth-Irish great grandfathers told the following story in his memories, writting over a period of years in the early 1900's.  He was describing his life as a child in the 1840's in eastern Tennessee.  They got up early and the men went out to tend farming and other chores, while the women saw to the household chores. They would call the men in sometime later for "breakfast", which he said usually consisted of a corn gruel, perhaps some meat, and occasionally bread. One morning he recalled well, they came in when called and sat down at the table. His father (a baptist minister) made the statement " it would be nice if a man could get some bread once in a while".  He recalls that his mother never said a word, just went over to the fireplace, got the dutch oven, took it to the door and threw breakfast out. His father silently got up and went back to work.
        I think his father was a very smart man not to say anything. They later were called back into the house and there was breakfast, with bread. Some actions hurt worse than a "frying pan".
      Claudie Swiney
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: gpatrick
      Sent: Friday, August 08, 2008 11:41 AM
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

      Since my Moravian half of my family had many very strong women who would have had no problem delivering the "FRYING Pan  LESSON" to the males in the family who went too far with their fun-making, I can simply say that I hope I know where to draw the line  So, if I sometimes go too far please feel free to apply the rolling  pen or frying pan or a good sharp Moravian tounge-lashing.  Seems that most of  we Czechs and Moravians came equipped with a nice thick skin that served us well in this great land of opportunity.  I've been on lots of E-groups  but this  one is by far the best there is.
       
      Sincere George--for a change.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: pfoster
      Sent: Friday, August 08, 2008 10:25 AM
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

      After rereading my email,  I realized it might be misconstrued.   I believe George was yanking a few of us women's chains.  A lot of Czech/Moravian men have a "corky" sense of humor.  George, probably knew from previous emails how I would act.  That said yes live was hard for the women, but unfortuately that was their lot in life.  I would say the majority of women were strong.  As for the men, yes there were quite a few that I beilieve a few good whacks of my Grandmammas frgying pan would have been a great attitude changer.  I have some of those men in my family trees.
      Most of the men though were good and strong who relied on these women's strength and faith.  I was raised by such a man.  Now all said and done, I would not be who I am if it was not for one fiesty strong Moravian Woman who was a sharecroppers wife and then a waitress all her life. Her life was not easy, but as many of the women before her I believe St. Peter said just come on in you have done a good job.  paulasmaggie 
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: pfoster
      Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2008 3:18 AM
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

      Men provided food and shelter.  Most women had several births, losing some, & were close together.  All women cleaned, canned, sewed, washing, raising/dressing chickens, grew a garden, raised the children, all without any modern convience plus most had to work in the fields too.  Hmm,  maybe they were just too tired to talk, St. Peter just said go right on in.  Just a thought!  paulasmaggie
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: gpatrick
      Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2008 7:20 PM
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

      So, perhaps the men know where they are going and the women have to talk their way in???   Just a thought!
       
      George
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: pfoster
      Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2008 5:20 PM
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

      Observation.  Have any of you notice that a lot of the wives headstones have these beautiful thoughts on them, then the husband is just name, birth, and death dates?  I have a few in my family tree like that.  paulasmaggie
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2008 3:52 PM
      Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

      I think it's probably:
       
      Zde odpočiva                Here rests
      Manželka a Matka        Wife and mother
      Nar (Narozena)              Born
      22 Zaři 1883                  22 September 1883
      ve Seline                      in Selina (Name of town?)
      na Moravě                    in Moravia 
      Zenr (Zemřela)              Died
      22 Srp (Srpna) 1912      22 August 1912
      Spi sladce                    Sleep sweetly
      a odpočívej                   and rest
      pokoji                           in peace
      Ma draha                      My dear
      Manželko                      wife.
      Na shledanou                Farewell
       
      Joe
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2008 2:56 PM
      Subject: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

      There is a headstone for Frantiska Kovar in Plum, Tx that says the
      following:
      Zde odpociva
      Manzelha a Matha
      Nar
      22 Zari 1883
      ve Seline
      na Morave
      Zenr
      22 Srp 1912
      Spi sladie
      a odpocivej
      poboji
      ma draha
      Manzelko
      Mazhledanu

      Hopefully, I read and copied the vowels correctly.
      I'm thinking that she was the first wife of John Domin Kovar - but
      looking for documentation. Any help with the translation or if
      anyone knows anything about this person, I would appreciate the help.


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    • Tonya Hettler
      Bless your heart! See, my ignorance is showing! lol From: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 9:46 AM
      Message 51 of 51 , Mar 5

        Bless your heart! See, my ignorance is showing! lol

         

        From: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com]
        Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 9:46 AM
        To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

         

         

        Tonya,

         

        There are many characters that can be "made" that way, but not all Czech letters with diacritical marks can be. I still need to do cut and paste (or have a toggle to another keyboard set up) to "make" the ones in my last name - Kůrečka 

         

        Pavel

         


        From: "'Tonya Hettler' spffcmh@... [TexasCzechs]"
        To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, March 4, 2017 5:21 PM
        Subject: RE: [TexasCzechs] Translation needed

         

         

        Hi Joe! I’m a lurker here but wanted to share. Google Translate  (https://translate.google.com/#auto/en/dnov%C3%A9) shows dnové to be days. Any computer can make the letters if you hold down the “Alt” key and type a code. I’ve got it taped to the laptop and it is posted below.

        Tonya

         

        To type

        Alt +

        ä

        0228

        é

        0233

        ö

        0246

        ü

        0252

        Ä

        0196

        ß

        0223

        Ö

        0214

        Ü

        0220

        °degree

        0176

        §

        0167

         

         

         

         

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