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Kolache help

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  • Wendy and Greg
    I m going to make my first attempt at making kolaches this week. I ve already made poppyseed rolls and feel comfortable with them. Does anyone have tips
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 10, 2000
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      I'm going to make my first attempt at making kolaches this week.  I've already made poppyseed rolls and feel comfortable with them.  Does anyone have tips about how to make the fruit filling?  As far as I can tell you simply take canned fruit and cook it with a little cornstarch to thicken it.
       
      Thank you.
       
       
      Wendy and Greg Wittenbrook
      wengreg@...
    • robert veselka
      conrad1@flash.net
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 10, 2000
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        conrad1@...

        Wendy and Greg wrote:

        I'm going to make my first attempt at making kolaches this week.  I've already made poppyseed rolls and feel comfortable with them.  Does anyone have tips about how to make the fruit filling?  As far as I can tell you simply take canned fruit and cook it with a little cornstarch to thicken it. Thank you.  Wendy and Greg Wittenbrook
        wengreg@...

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      • Frank G.Soural
        Does anyone know how to make Povidl for the kolaches. My wife Lois would like to know what goes into the plum povidl. much obliged, Frank *********** REPLY
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 10, 2000
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          Does anyone know how to make "Povidl" for the kolaches.
          My wife Lois would like to know what goes into the plum povidl.
           
          much obliged, Frank

          *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

          On 4/10/00 at 8:43 PM Wendy and Greg wrote:
          I'm going to make my first attempt at making kolaches this week.  I've already made poppyseed rolls and feel comfortable with them.  Does anyone have tips about how to make the fruit filling?  As far as I can tell you simply take canned fruit and cook it with a little cornstarch to thicken it.
           
          Thank you.
           
           
          Wendy and Greg Wittenbrook
          wengreg@...


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        • richardgarza1@juno.com
          ... One must have a very large crockery bowl, a kolache bowl, in which to make the dough. Some are handed down from mother to daughter. There are many
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 11, 2000
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            On Tue, 11 Apr 2000 11:09:44 EDT SRektorik@... writes:
            >
            One must have a very large crockery bowl, a kolache bowl, in which
            to make the dough. Some are handed down from mother to daughter.
            There are many daughters in our family. My Dad bought one for me when
            I was in my teens. It has a knife sharpening rim. I tried to find a
            traditional one
            (beige or beige with blue decoration) for my daughter but have not yet
            located
            one.
            ----------------------------
            Susan,
            Don't know where you live but, for old-fashioned crockery bowls try:
            Buffalo Hardware, Houston
            Heinsohn's Gen'l Mdse, Frelsburg
            Mican's Ace Hdwe, Brenham
            Holub's Dry Goods, Wallis

            Thanks for sharing the family recipes for kolache fillings.

            Sharing. It's What It's All About!
            Rick Garza
            http://www.garza-zattler.homepage.com/
            NameSearch: GARZA, ZATTLER, REYNA, FOSTER, SCHACHTNER, STOPFER,
            HOLLMAIER, VOGEL, VOGL, WEINZIERL, FINK
            Bavarian Towns: Koetzting, K�tzting, Beckendorf b. K�tzting, Muenchen,
            Oberreit b. Vilshofen, Sch�nerting b. Vilshofen, Munich, Germany


            ________________________________________________________________
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          • epereira@swbell.net
            Mom only uses fresh or dried fruit. I don t have her recipe right in front of me but I do have the KJZT Cookbook and it states for example, Apricot Filling:
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 11, 2000
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              Mom only uses fresh or dried fruit. I don't have her recipe right in front of me but I do have the KJZT Cookbook and it states for example, Apricot Filling:
              Use 1/2 lb. dry apricots, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 tsp. lemon juice
              Put apricots in pot and add just enough water to cover the apricots. Cook on low heat about 20 to 25 minutes or until tender. Add sugar and cook until sugar is dissolved; add lemon juice. Cool Well.

              Wendy and Greg wrote:

               I'm going to make my first attempt at making kolaches this week.  I've already made poppyseed rolls and feel comfortable with them.  Does anyone have tips about how to make the fruit filling?  As far as I can tell you simply take canned fruit and cook it with a little cornstarch to thicken it. Thank you.  Wendy and Greg Wittenbrook
              wengreg@...

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            • epereira@swbell.net
              Could you mean posipka that goes on the top? If so then it is only 1 c sugar, 3/4 c flour and 1/4 c melted butter. Mix all together. Frank G.Soural wrote: Does
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 11, 2000
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                Could you mean posipka that goes on the top? If so then it is only 1 c sugar, 3/4 c flour and 1/4 c melted butter. Mix all together.

                Frank G.Soural wrote:

                 Does anyone know how to make "Povidl" for the kolaches.My wife Lois would like to know what goes into the plum povidl. much obliged, Frank

                *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

                On 4/10/00 at 8:43 PM Wendy and Greg wrote:

                I'm going to make my first attempt at making kolaches this week.  I've already made poppyseed rolls and feel comfortable with them.  Does anyone have tips about how to make the fruit filling?  As far as I can tell you simply take canned fruit and cook it with a little cornstarch to thicken it. Thank you.  Wendy and Greg Wittenbrook
                wengreg@...

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              • epereira@swbell.net
                Amen. I have one other memory though of kolache making. That is the time before you even start when your father or in my case, my grandfather would sit for
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 11, 2000
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                  Amen. I have one other memory though of kolache making. That is the time before you even start when your father
                  or in my case, my grandfather would sit for hours, days on end, whittling the bread stick that is used to stir with. He
                  made one for his wife and each of his daughters. The daughters then pass it down to their daughter.  Since I am the
                  only daughter I won't have to fight anyone for mine. When I help Mom and use that big bread stick I feel and see my
                  Grandpa. Al l of them are still being used and we are talking at least 50-70 years each. Czechs knew how to make
                  things that lasted.......Lois Petter Pereira

                  SRektorik@... wrote:

                   There are probably as many ways of making the filling for kolaches as there
                  are cooks. In the end, you can do it any way which you choose.  However for
                  some of us the making of kolaches is an enjoyable and rewarding experience in
                  itself.  Having fond memories of all the sights and scents in my
                  Grandmother's kitchen when we made kolaches, there is great enjoyment in the
                  process of actually making them for me.  I try to make them with my daughter
                  so that we share in the pleasure and I always find the experience of making
                  them a joy in itself.  Tradition is very important to me when making
                  kolaches, I know you just asked about the fillings...but there can be so much
                  more.  Good karma comes to those who celebrate in the making of food which is
                  to be shared.

                  One must have a very large crockery bowl, a kolache bowl, in which to make
                  the dough.  Some are handed down from mother to daughter.  There are many
                  daughters in our family.  My Dad bought one for me when I was in my teens.
                  It has a knife sharpening rim.  I tried to find a traditional one (beige or
                  beige with blue decoration) for my daughter but have not yet located one.  I
                  did find a lovely blue and white one for her...but it is not traditional.  It
                  is in this bowl which one places the yeast, sugar and warm water.  It is from
                  it that the earthy scent of the growing yeast rises.  It is in this bowl that
                  the milk, melted shortening, salt, and flour are added and mixed.  It is to
                  this bowl and the worked dough is returned in order to rise.  It is over this
                  bowl that a clean white cloth is placed to keep the temperature steady.  It
                  is a celebration of birth and rebirth.

                  The fruit you choose for the fillings are up to you.  Apricot, apple, berry,
                  plum, and prune are often used.  It used to be what one could keep on hand
                  without refrigeration or what was available locally.  Cottage cheese is also
                  popular with some.  I will relate the family recipes; but first, I must
                  encourage you to fully enjoy the experience.  Purchased fillings can be used
                  but then you miss so much.  The scents of simmering fruit, spices, and
                  vanilla are so pleasant and the taste is ever so rich.  The colors and
                  textures are also delightful.

                  The following recipes come from women who learned to make kolaches from their
                  mothers and grandmothers.

                  Prune Filling by Linda Rektorik Conrad

                  1    Large package dried prunes  (the pitted ones cost more but are easier to
                  use and
                  less time is consumed that when has to remove the
                  pits)
                  1    Teaspoon cinnamon
                  1    Teaspoon vanilla
                  3/4 Cup sugar

                  Cover the prunes with water in a medium-sized pot and simmer until tender.
                  Drain the liquid (In the old country the juice is sometimes mixed into hot
                  tea).

                  Mash the prunes until smooth, if using the pitted ones.  If using whole
                  prunes then remove the pits with your fingers and then mash.  Then add the
                  cinnamon, vanilla, and sugar.

                  This recipe makes enough filling for about 3 dozen kolaches.  I reduce it and
                  make other fillings at the same time for a variety.  This recipe works well
                  with dried apples, peaches, and apricots.  Women usually either prefer almond
                  or vanilla extract in their fillings.  You will have to decide for yourself
                  which you prefer.

                  Apricot Filling by Virginia Rektorik Atkinson

                  2    Packages of dried Apricots
                  1    29 ounce can of Apricots
                        Sugar
                  1/2  Teaspoon Almond Extract

                  Cook two packages of dried apricots until soft.  Drain well.  Open and drain
                  the canned apricots.  Combine the two.  Mash.  Sweeten to taste, about two
                  cups of sugar or more if desired. Add 1/2 teaspoon almond extract.

                  Cottage Cheese Filling by Virginia Rektorik Atkinson

                  1     24 ounce container of small curd cottage cheese, well drained
                  1     Cup sugar
                  1     Teaspoon vanilla extract
                  1/2  Teaspoon almond extract
                  3     egg yolks

                  The cottage cheese must be well drained or the filling will be runny.  Mash
                  the cottage cheese.  Add the other ingredients.

                  Since you said you already made poppy seed rolls, I am assuming you have a
                  traditional dough recipe.  What about the Popsicka, do you have a recipe for
                  that? Let me know if you do not.

                  My daughter did a family history research project on Kolaches last year.  In
                  her survey, she found that, in our family, kolaches represent bonds of
                  friendship and kin, shared pleasurable times, and long remembered scents and
                  sights to the women.  The men generally remembered just the scent of freshly
                  baked kolaches and the taste.  Almost everyone remembers burning their mouth
                  on the still too hot filling.

                  I hope that, for you, the actual experience of making kolaches is at least as
                  pleasurable as is the eating of them.

                  Susan Rektorik Henley


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                • epereira@swbell.net
                  Yes I would be interested in the recipe. I have my mother s recipe but we have many cousins who know nothing about it and are interested in learning. The step
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 11, 2000
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                    Yes I would be interested in the recipe. I have my mother's recipe but we have many cousins who know nothing about it and are interested in learning. The step by step would prove useful to them. In the KJZT cookbook it has Poppy Seed Filling.
                    1 c ground poppy seed, 1/2 c. sugar, 1/2 c milk, 1/2 stick margarine, 1 Tbsp flour
                        Mix flour in sugar. Heat milk in pot and when it boils add remaining ingredients and cook slowly until it thickens. Cool well. When making poppy seed koloaches, instead of making balls, spread the golf ball size dough out flat and oblong. Place about 1 heaping teaspoonful of filling in center. Bring the dough up to enclose the filling and pinch dough together making an oblong roll. Put pinched side of kolache to the greased pan. Brush lightly with melted margarine. Let rise in a warm place. Bake at 350 degrees about 15 to 20 minutes. While warm, brush with melted margarine. Sprinkle with some sugar.

                    Hint---my mom is now a modern cook so she no longer used chicken feathers to grease her kolaches when they are done. She uses a pastry brush. She used melted butter in a little milk. Brush this on and it will make them tender and melt in your mouth. She also told me Lard is not a 4 letter word and she will use it occasionally to brush instead of butter...Lois Petter Pereira
                    SRektorik@... wrote:

                     Well, the lack of a written family recipe for the fruit filling explains it.
                    I was somewhat baffled as to how you (Wendy Bartek Wittenbrook) could master
                    the poppyseed rolls but be asking about fillings. It is lucky for you that
                    you found the dough and popsika recipes which your family uses.  I'm afraid
                    many have been lost.

                    When she was growing up, one of my mother's chores was to make the bread for
                    the family.  She never used a written recipe for kolaches.  My grandmother
                    never used a written recipe and certainly not measuring devices when making
                    kolaches.

                    Our family kolache crisis came after both my grandmother and mother died
                    (mother died young).  We found we had no recipes.  We were finally saved by
                    the eldest sister.  When she first married she has asked Grandma for the
                    kolache recipe and found that one did not exist.  Sometime later on, my
                    grandmother handed her a kolache recipe from the December 1963 issue of the
                    The Progressive Farmer magazine and said "this is about what I do". The
                    recipe was submitted by a Mrs. Jerabeck.  My eldest sister still has the
                    original page from the magazine.  My next up-the-line sister was in high
                    school at this time.  She received a card from the eldest sister with the
                    recipe typed on it.  She uses that recipe card through this day.  I have seen
                    it, it has yellowed and has spots on it.  The filling recipes weren't written
                    down for us either; however, there were enough of us spanning a good number
                    of years so that some still knew how to make it.

                    We have changed the recipe some.  For instance, Grandma always scalded the
                    milk.  We weren't sure why since once the shortening has melted in the milk,
                    you must then cool the mixture before adding it to the yeast culture or it
                    will kill it.  My eldest sister asked a home economics instructor and as best
                    they could figure the milk needed to be scalded because, back then, it was
                    not processed and purified.  The scalding purified the milk.
                     

                    I have found that the quantity of flour required achieve a good texture for
                    the dough varies from time to time.  I am blessed as I have apparently
                    inherited "the feel for the dough".  I find the kolache dough wonderfully
                    forgiving an infinitely workable.

                    Wendy, if you would care to share, I would like to know how you make the
                    poppyseed filling.  A recipe for that I do not have.

                    Also, if there is anyone out there who is interested in a "novice's version"
                    (with detailed guidance), my daughter and I developed one for her school
                    project on Kolaches.  I am more than willing to share.

                    Susan Rektorik Henley


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                  • Frank G.Soural
                    Thanks - Posipek is what goes on top. But povidl is the plum (souce) filling that either goes on top of a kolach or as a filler. It s curious that Povidl is
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 12, 2000
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                      Thanks - Posipek is what goes on top. But povidl is the plum (souce) filling that
                      either goes on top of a kolach or as a filler. It's curious that "Povidl"
                      is not known over here.
                      Yours was the only reply to my post.  Frank

                      *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

                      On 4/11/00 at 5:32 PM epereira@... wrote:
                      Could you mean posipka that goes on the top? If so then it is only 1 c sugar, 3/4 c flour and 1/4 c melted butter. Mix all together.

                      Frank G.Soural wrote:

                       Does anyone know how to make "Povidl" for the kolaches.My wife Lois would like to know what goes into the plum povidl. much obliged, Frank

                      *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

                      On 4/10/00 at 8:43 PM Wendy and Greg wrote:

                      I'm going to make my first attempt at making kolaches this week.  I've already made poppyseed rolls and feel comfortable with them.  Does anyone have tips about how to make the fruit filling?  As far as I can tell you simply take canned fruit and cook it with a little cornstarch to thicken it. Thank you.  Wendy and Greg Wittenbrook
                      wengreg@...

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