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Poppyseed Grinding & Filling

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  • Richard A Garza
    HI All, Some of you are wondering: What s the big deal about poppyseed filling? You open a can and there it is. Well, there really is a difference in taste
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 29, 2007
      HI All,
              Some of you are wondering: "What's the big deal about poppyseed filling? You open a can and there it is." Well, there really is a difference in taste between the stuff that comes in a can marked "Solo" and making the poppyseed filling from scratch.
              First, you start with about 1-1/2 cups of fresh, raw poppy seeds. Next, you find Grandma's poppyseed grinder that's been hiding in the pantry all these years (more about that later) and clamp it to a table or counter. And, no, you can't just pop the seeds into the milk as they first need to be ground to release their hidden flavor. Now, just in case someone's messed around with the knob on the back, put a teaspoon of poppyseeds into the hopper and slowly start turning the handle and watch the poppyseeds come out the front. They should come out looking like ground pepper - no oil or waxy look to the seeds. If so, adjust the knob on the back till the grinder just breaks the seeds. When satisfied, proceed to grind the rest of the seeds and you'll end up with about 2 cups worth.
               You say you didn't inherit Stara or Aunt Binky's poppyseed grinder? No problem. You can find them on the web & sometimes at your local hardware/general store. But those little boogers can get expensive - $40, $50, or $60 for the nice cast iron with copper or brass fittings. No problem. There is a solution.
              About a year or so ago, I read an article that said you could use an electric coffee grinder for grinding your poppyseeds. That's as far as it went. No instructions. Nada! I'd picked up an extra Krups coffee grinder at Sam's for about $15 that I use strictly for spices. But there's no adjustment knob to control the grind. How would I keep the seeds from turning into a waxy/oily mess. So I sat on the idea and it would pop back up every now and then.
              Finally, about two weeks ago I needed a poppyseed fix and decided to make another poppyseed strudel/makovy zavin. I also decided to try out that coffee grinder idea. I put in a tablespoonful and held the power button for 5 seconds. Way too much time. After a few more tries I discovered that the electric coffee grinder worked perfectly at 2 seconds maximum.
              So, if you'd like to try making your own poppyseed filling but don't want to buy a grinder that you might rarely use, try an inexpensive electric coffee grinder and see what you think.
              Below is the poppyseed filling recipe I use most often.
      Rick Garza
       
      Poppy Seed Filling:
      1/2 cup raisins
      2 pinches ground cloves or cinnamon
      1/4 cup rum
      1/2 cup milk
      1 cup sugar
      2 cups poppy seeds, ground
      1 tablespoon honey
      Zest of 1 lemon, grated
      To make the filling: Put the raisins and a pinch of ground cloves or cinnamon in the rum for 10 to 15 minutes to soak and soften. Bring the milk, sugar, and poppy seeds to a boil over medium heat. Add the honey, lemon zest, and a pinch of ground cinnamon or cloves. Add the raisins and rum to the mixture. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the liquid is reduced and the filling holds its shape (about 15 to 20 minutes).

    • livanec@aol.com
      Sounds like it will taste good but how do you get the Poppy seed taste with cinnamon, lemon zest & cloves?
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 29, 2007
        Sounds like it will taste good but how do you get the Poppy seed taste with cinnamon, lemon zest & cloves?
      • Richard A Garza
        Hi Allen, I don t know, Allen. A pinch of cinnamon or cloves isn t enough to overpower a tadpole, much less two cups of poppyseed. I m attaching three recipes
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 29, 2007
          Hi Allen,
                  I don't know, Allen. A pinch of cinnamon or cloves isn't enough to overpower a tadpole, much less two cups of poppyseed. I'm attaching three recipes for your review, from German and Czech sources where poppy seed usage is standard.
          Rick Garza
          Sharing. It's what it's all about!
          http://www.texasczechs.homestead.com/
           
          On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 18:09:16 EST livanec@... writes:
          Sounds like it will taste good but how do you get the Poppy seed taste with cinnamon, lemon zest & cloves?

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