Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Travel from New Orleans to Texas

Expand Messages
  • janapivec
    I bought a CD (on ebay, I think) that has dozens of historical maps from Texas History. Several show railroads for various different years. I couldn t find
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 6, 2006
      I bought a CD (on ebay, I think) that has dozens of historical maps
      from Texas History. Several show railroads for various different
      years. I couldn't find any that showed an unbroken route in 1860, when
      my guys traveled--so probably how they traveled depended on when they
      traveled.

      Jan Esenwein
    • Jim Hlavac
      On from New Orleans to Texas: Over the years this changed -- and also depended on funds available to the traveler as well as final destination in Texas. Some
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 6, 2006
        On from New Orleans to Texas:
        Over the years this changed -- and also depended on funds available to the traveler as well as final destination in Texas. Some tickets purchased in Europe were actually "through" trips from Bremerhaven, Le Harve or Southhampton to New Orleans to Texas with multiple changeovers.  Some tickets were simply to New Orleans with the immigrant finding his own way after that.  Some immigrants seemed to have stayed a few days to a week, or more, in New Orleans recuperating from their ocean journey, earning a little extra money, (and even burying their dead in New Orleans.)  In their brief time there they created no official records, but lots of anecdotal evidence.
         
        The earlier the trip the more broken up it was, there were several alternate routes, but as many of you are aware, Louisiana is filled with rivers/swamp -- way too much water as we now know :(  -- so travel was by hops, skips and jumps:
         
         -- a person might take a steamer from New Orleans up to Baton Rouge, then a ferry across the Mississippi and then get on a train westward -- to Beaumont or Houston. Prior to 1870 a ferry across the Atchafalaya and then later the Sabine would be necessary, post 1870 there was pretty much a continuous rail line with bridges from Port Allen, La., on the west bank towards Texas  -- and then change to other trains to various Texas points.
         -- a person might take a steamer or train to Houma or Morgan City, Louisiana, and then ferry across the Atchafalaya, then by wagon/car or train to Lafyette, then by train westward to Beaumont/Houston. Or catch a coastal steamer in Morgan City.
        -- a person might take a steamer to Natchez or Vicksburg, Mississippi, then ferry across the Mississippi River to hook up with a train across Louisiana towards Dallas and other North Texas points.
        -- a person might take a steamer from New Orleans to either Washington or Alexandria, Louisiana, where they would pick up a train heading towards Texas.
        -- a person could have taken a "non-stop" steamer from New Orleans to either Beaumont or Galveston.
        -- a person could have taken a "local-stops" steamer from New Orleans to Morgan City, Lake Charles and then Texas points.
        -- a person could have taken a "stage coach" overland through Louisiana, ferrying across the rivers, and continuing westward.
         -- I'm sure more than a few walked or hitched a ride when ever they could to save money, or not spend what they didn't have.
         
        Immigrants entering New Orleans would be processed there, and then once on their trip to Texas would need no further official contact until they arrived at their destination.  Only those going directly to Galveston were processed at that city.
         
        So it all depended on the arrangements the immigrant made prior to leaving Europe, his/her means, his preferred method of travel (some didn't want any more sea voyages,) their final destination, and what means and infrastructure were available in the era in which he/she traveled. (Remember there was no Train Bridge across the Mississippi in Louisiana until 1928.  The only one was really the Eads Bridge at St. Louis Missouri.)
         
        To my knowledge there was no single method or system, but was rather up to each individual to make that decision.  There are no extant registries of passengers on trains, inland steamers and coches -- for one wasn't kept - you bought a ticket and went.  There are, deep in the bowels of various archives in Louisiana, examples of travel "brochures," rate cards and time schedules for all sorts of methods to travel westward. 
         
        Cheers,
        Jim Hlavac

        janapivec <jesenwei@...> wrote:
        I bought a CD (on ebay, I think) that has dozens of historical maps
        from Texas History.  Several show railroads for various different
        years.  I couldn't find any that showed an unbroken route in 1860, when
        my guys traveled--so probably how they traveled depended on when they
        traveled.

        Jan Esenwein






        Relax. Yahoo! Mail virus scanning helps detect nasty viruses!

      • Diane Baldwin
        I thought my grandparents came into Indianola and then I thought they went by wagon but not sure. Diane janapivec wrote: I bought a
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 6, 2006
          I thought my grandparents came into Indianola and then I thought they went by wagon but not sure.
           
          Diane

          janapivec <jesenwei@...> wrote:
          I bought a CD (on ebay, I think) that has dozens of historical maps
          from Texas History.  Several show railroads for various different
          years.  I couldn't find any that showed an unbroken route in 1860, when
          my guys traveled--so probably how they traveled depended on when they
          traveled.

          Jan Esenwein





        • Nangotoo
          I do know, or have read, that in 1856, when my earliest ancestors came to TX from Frenstat, Moravia, that they were met with wagons of some sort that took
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 16, 2006
            I do know, or have read,  that in 1856, when my earliest ancestors came to TX from Frenstat, Moravia, that they were met with wagons of some sort that took them first to Cat Springs in Austin Co. and then to Bluff in Fayette Co.  I think if there had been any train route to Fayette Co. back then they would have gone by train.  What I want to know if WHO met them at the ship and served as the guide for the first group of Catholic Czechs to come to TX.  There were quite a few in their party-adults, children (some were toddlers) so they had to have several wagons.  What pulled the wagons? What size wagons?  Who got to ride and who walked in that party?  It was quite a ways from Galveston to their destination and they had just come off of a long voyage.  Does anyone have any insight into how the immigrants from the 1856 era traveled to Cat Springs and then on to Fayette Co.?  I'm trying to piece it together. 
             
            Nan
             
            >>I bought a CD (on ebay, I think) that has dozens of historical maps
            from Texas History.  Several show railroads for various different
            years.  I couldn't find any that showed an unbroken route in 1860, when
            my guys traveled--so probably how they traveled depended on when they
            traveled.<<

          • livanec@aol.com
            John Kroulik of Houston, Texas did extensive research on the early Czech immigration to Texas. You may want to contact the Czech Heritage Society of Texas.
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 16, 2006
              John Kroulik of Houston, Texas did extensive research on the early Czech immigration to Texas. You may want to contact the Czech Heritage Society of Texas. They should be able to direct you to him or other researchers. The Czech Heritage Society has a lot of Czech data. Czech immigration to Texas started in 1850 by Rev. Bergman and his family to Cat Springs, Texas.
            • granny pat
              Nan, do you know the name of the ship your ancestors came in? I have ancestors who arrived in 1856 on the Jacob Grosse, and I m interested in learning how they
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 16, 2006
                Nan, do you know the name of the ship your ancestors came in? I have ancestors who arrived in 1856 on the Jacob Grosse, and I'm interested in learning how they got to Cat Springs.
                 
                Pat
                 
              • tvfella@aol.com
                On travel from Galveston of Lavaca County, our family story has it that Old Man Stasney sp? met them with wagons. Jim Fella (Filla)
                Message 7 of 15 , Feb 16, 2006
                  On travel from Galveston of Lavaca County, our family story has it that "Old Man Stasney sp?" met them with wagons.
                   
                  Jim Fella (Filla)
                • Nangotoo
                  ... Pat
                  Message 8 of 15 , Feb 16, 2006
                     
                     
                    >>Nan, do you know the name of the ship your ancestors came in? I have ancestors who arrived in 1856 on the Jacob Grosse, and I'm interested in learning how they got to Cat Springs.
                     
                    Pat<<
                     
                    Yes, Pat, I do know what ship my g-g-grandparents came on in Aug. 1856.  They came to Galveston on a scooner named Anna Elize.  Who were your ancestors, Pat?  If they arrived in 1858, they were in the same immigrant wave as my ancestors, Valentin Antonin KOLIBAL and his wife, Franziska (nee:RECEK) and three of their young daughters.  In that first group were also some of Franziska's relatives, Benjamin KLIMICEK (her BIL), Antonin RECEK, and others.  The historical marker says that they arrived at Bluff in Nov.
                     
                    A distant cousin wrote years ago that they took steamboats to Houston from the shore of Galveston, but I haven't found her sources yet because she didn't source her material.  I don't know her (the material was passed to me by a first cousin of hers who found me and I communicated with).  He doesn't know about her sourcing either.  After they got off of the steamboats in Houston, they took oxcarts to Cat Spring, rested for while, and continued on to LaGrange by oxcarts.  Now, remember than I don't have any sourcing material, but she found the info somewhere.
                     
                    I have a listing of those families arriving in 1856--the ones on the Anna Elise and the ones who came in soon after and the villages they came from.
                     
                    Listen to this description from the Czech Footprints book (Ceska osada v.Bluff--the Czech Community in Bluff) where my family settled.  The "most romantic part of the blessed and advanced Fayette County....fertile fields and rustling woods..everywhere beauty and prosperity. No wonder that our people moving over there selected this place for a new place to live--for a new homeland."  Isn't that beautiful?  Unfoirtunately, my g-g-grandparents weren't very successful with their land, but it still sounds wonderful.  :-D
                     
                    I am yet to find the ship names on my other g-grandparents and g-g-grandparents from both sides who came later.  So far, they are eluding me, but I will find them.  They came all through the 1870's to 1879.  Its hard to keep them all straight at times because it seems they all have the same first names from generation to generation and it's also hard to keep remembering who is on what side of my families in TX  since they all seem to use the same given names in every family on both sides.  Good ol' traditional naming rites. :-)
                     
                    Nan


                     
                  • Nangotoo
                    That s wonderful! Thank you for that information. Does anyone have a email address or snail mail address/phone # ? I live in CA so it would be hard to
                    Message 9 of 15 , Feb 16, 2006
                      That's wonderful!  Thank you for that information.  Does anyone have a email address or snail mail address/phone # ?   I live in CA so it would be hard to contact him in person or to visit the Czech Heritage Society (I'd love to and plan to someday, though). 
                       
                      Nan
                       
                      John Kroulik of Houston, Texas did extensive research on the early Czech immigration to Texas. You may want to contact the Czech Heritage Society of Texas. They should be able to direct you to him or other researchers. The Czech Heritage Society has a lot of Czech data. Czech immigration to Texas started in 1850 by Rev. Bergman and his family to Cat Springs, Texas.
                    • Nangotoo
                      What year, Jim? Where did they get that info so I can check into it or do they have sources provided? It sure sounds good to me. Who the heck is Old Man
                      Message 10 of 15 , Feb 16, 2006
                        What year, Jim?  Where did they get that info so I can check into it or do they have sources provided?  It sure sounds good to me.  Who the heck is "Old Man Stasney", though, and where did he live.  Who were your ancestors who came through there?

                        On travel from Galveston of Lavaca County, our family story has it that "Old Man Stasney sp?" met them with wagons.
                         
                        Jim Fella (Filla)
                      • Cindy Neal
                        Address and email are listed on the library webpage at HYPERLINK http://www.czechheritage.org/chs_library.html http://www.czechheritage.org/ chs_library.html
                        Message 11 of 15 , Feb 16, 2006
                          Message
                          Address and email are listed on the library webpage at http://www.czechheritage.org/chs_library.html  They will do lookups and make copies for you from their books.  I'm not sure of the cost, but there is a toll free phone number also listed.
                           
                          Cindy
                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nangotoo
                          Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2006 12:56 PM
                          To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Travel from New Orleans to Texas

                          That's wonderful!  Thank you for that information.  Does anyone have a email address or snail mail address/phone # ?   I live in CA so it would be hard to contact him in person or to visit the Czech Heritage Society (I'd love to and plan to someday, though). 

                          --
                          No virus found in this outgoing message.
                          Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                          Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.15.10/262 - Release Date: 2/16/2006

                        • livanec@aol.com
                          The wed site is: czechheritage.org. Phone 1-866-293-2443 (toll free) or 1-713-349-0500.
                          Message 12 of 15 , Feb 17, 2006
                            The wed site is: czechheritage.org. Phone 1-866-293-2443 (toll free) or 1-713-349-0500.
                          • granny pat
                            Nan, my ancestors were the Jan Zabcik family, his single brother Martin, and his single sister, Anna. They arrived in Galveston in early February 1856. The
                            Message 13 of 15 , Feb 17, 2006
                              Nan, my ancestors were the Jan Zabcik family, his single brother Martin, and his single sister, Anna. They arrived in Galveston in early February 1856. The single brother Martin Zabcik, stayed in Houston for awhile before moving to Austin County. While still in Houston he married Anna Repka.  I've not been successful in finding any information on sister Anna.
                               
                              Jan and his family moved to Austin County where my gr-grandfather was born in Industry on May 15, 1856. The family lived in several of the surrounding communities of Travis, Cat Springs, Blieblerville, and Welcome (near Wesley) where my grandmother was born. Jan Zabcik is buried in the Wesley Brethren Cemetery. The families moved to Bell County sometime around 1890.
                               
                              I've been researching since 1986 and have just recently found the name of the ship--the Jacob Grosse. Now I'm trying to find information on the ship and also a picture.
                               
                              Pat
                               
                               
                            • Dolores Miller
                              Could you be refering to Joseph Stasny who lived on Howard St. in Taylor. He was referrred to as Old Man Stasny in his later yeaars. He was a prominent
                              Message 14 of 15 , Feb 17, 2006
                                Could you be refering to Joseph Stasny who lived on Howard St. in Taylor.  He was referrred to as "Old Man Stasny" in his later yeaars.  He was a prominent citzen who dealt in cotton futures. He had two sons, Dan & Jerome and two ddaughters, Mary & Sybil. He is buried in St. Mary's Cemetery in Taylor. His granddaughter Betty, is one of  my best friends.


                                Nangotoo <nangotoo@...> wrote:
                                What year, Jim?  Where did they get that info so I can check into it or do they have sources provided?  It sure sounds good to me.  Who the heck is "Old Man Stasney", though, and where did he live.  Who were your ancestors who came through there?

                                On travel from Galveston of Lavaca County, our family story has it that "Old Man Stasney sp?" met them with wagons.
                                 
                                Jim Fella (Filla)




                                Yahoo! Mail
                                Use Photomail to share photos without annoying attachments.

                              • Sara Ann Barton
                                Dear Nan, The following from the 1977-Diamond Jubilee 1952 St. Cyril & Methodius, 2nd Edition, 7/6/1952 Dubina booklet (Columbus library TR/S4/976.49/Fayette).
                                Message 15 of 15 , Mar 1, 2006

                                  Dear Nan,
                                  The following from the 1977-Diamond Jubilee 1952 St. Cyril & Methodius, 2nd Edition, 7/6/1952 Dubina booklet (Columbus library TR/S4/976.49/Fayette). may provide a little insight about how our relatives made it inland to Dubina. Sorry I did not have time to enter this when you sent your original email and then I got bounced off the Texas Czech email and this message was never sent. The Dubina booklet says on All Saints Day, 1856 a tug took the Anne Elise from Galveston up Buffalo Bayou to Houston, then 6 days to travel from Houston to Cat Springs by oxen and wagon, 2 weeks spent in Cat Springs and then Charles and Joseph Brasher took them from Cat Springs to Dubina (arriving at the end of November) by wagon and then the Brashers returned to La Grange. In the narrative below, Frank Sugarek was my great, great grandfather.
                                  Sara Barton

                                  Under Founding of Dubina "...For a more detailed account of this early history of Dubina, we quote from an address of Judge August Haidusek (son of Valentine Haidusek born 9/19/1845 in Morava, Europe. As a boy he came to America with his family.), a member of the original group made at Dubina on Nov. 4, 1906, commemorating the 50th anniversay of the coming of the first settlers.  Mr. Haidusek was 12 years old when the trip with his parents was started to America. It was the first part of September in the year 1856 when a small group of families and individuals from the Northeastern part of Moravia started on the long trek to America with the intention of settling herer. They set said from Bramenhaven in a small sail boat one hundred feet in length. After a day's journey the boat ran into a severe storm lasting 24 hours, almost wrecking the ship. It arrived in GTalveston 14 weeks later. The next day which was the feast of All Saints a tug took the boat to Houston up the Buffalo Bayou. A worn out but happy group stepped on American soil for the first time. Those in the group who first arived and settled in Dubina were: Frank Marak, Joseph Kahlich, Ignac Sramek, Joseph Peter, Valentine Holub, Ignac Muzny, Valentine Haidusek; Frank Kossa and Mr. Marak followed the group to Dubina later. The other members of the group who made their homes elsewhere were Konstantine Chovanec, Josef Janda, Benjamin Klimicek, Valentine Kolibal, Vojtech Knezek, Frank Sugarek, Ignac Pustejovsky and two others. Jan Konvicka, Johanna Broz, Rosalie Muzny and Rosalie Holub settled in Dubina also. After 6 days of travel from Houston with oxen and wagons a stop was made near Cat Springs to spend the night. Here woeful tales were told about Texas by one of their own countrymen who preceded them to America. As a result some turned back and moved to Iowa. However another countryman by the name of Mr. Hirsch had more hopeful news and persuaded the rest to stay. Two weeks were spent at Cat Springs. During this time four of the group -- Mr. Haidusek, Mr. Holub, Mr Peter and Mr. Marak went out on a scouting expedition of this new territory. They came back with praise for the territory in Fayette County. With these good reports all proceded to La Grange and thence to Dubina. It was the last lap of the trip to Dubina that made history. It was in the afternoon at the end of the month of November, a brisk norther was blowing, it was raining and sleeting, when we arrrived by wagon a a spot studded with oaks. Here, soaked with the rain, we were left at the mercy of the weather; the only protection was the branches of the spreading oaks. There were no houses for miles around and the wagon driven by Charles and Joseph Brasher returned to La Grange. The good women wept for fear of freezing to death. The men took the situation in hand the best they could by building a huge fire. After supper which was served later a long night vigil followed. No one slept because of the cold and rain. The next day the weather cleared up and an improvised shelter ws made out of a log frame-work overlaid with grass. This served as a shelter for the next 6 months until Francis Kossa built a long cabin."

                                  -- "Nangotoo" <nangotoo@...> wrote:  Nan, do you know the name of the ship your ancestors came in? I have ancestors who arrived in 1856 on the Jacob Grosse, and I'm interested in learning how they got to Cat Springs.

                                  Pat<<
                                  Yes, Pat, I do know what ship my g-g-grandparents came on in Aug. 1856.  They came to Galveston on a scooner named Anna Elize.  Who were your ancestors, Pat?  If they arrived in 1858, they were in the same immigrant wave as my ancestors, Valentin Antonin KOLIBAL and his wife, Franziska (nee:RECEK) and three of their young daughters.  In that first group were also some of Franziska's relatives, Benjamin KLIMICEK (her BIL), Antonin RECEK, and others.  The historical marker says that they arrived at Bluff in Nov.
                                   
                                  A distant cousin wrote years ago that they took steamboats to Houston from the shore of Galveston, but I haven't found her sources yet because she didn't source her material.  I don't know her (the material was passed to me by a first cousin of hers who found me and I communicated with).  He doesn't know about her sourcing either.  After they got off of the steamboats in Houston, they took oxcarts to Cat Spring, rested for while, and continued on to LaGrange by oxcarts.  Now, remember than I don't have any sourcing material, but she found the info somewhere.
                                   
                                  I have a listing of those families arriving in 1856--the ones on the Anna Elise and the ones who came in soon after and the villages they came from.
                                   
                                  Listen to this description from the Czech Footprints book (Ceska osada v.Bluff--the Czech Community in Bluff) where my family settled.  The "most romantic part of the blessed and advanced Fayette County....fertile fields and rustling woods..everywhere beauty and prosperity. No wonder that our people moving over there selected this place for a new place to live--for a new homeland."  Isn't that beautiful?  Unfoirtunately, my g-g-grandparents weren't very successful with their land, but it still sounds wonderful.  :-D
                                   
                                  I am yet to find the ship names on my other g-grandparents and g-g-grandparents from both sides who came later.  So far, they are eluding me, but I will find them.  They came all through the 1870's to 1879.  Its hard to keep them all straight at times because it seems they all have the same first names from generation to generation and it's also hard to keep remembering who is on what side of my families in TX  since they all seem to use the same given names in every family on both sides.  Good ol' traditional naming rites. :-)
                                   
                                  Nan


                                   
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.