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The Eagle, the Man, and the Lions

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  • SRektorik@aol.com
    The story ended with Part 3. This message contains some general information on this folk tale. As I explained previously, this story was told to us, as
    Message 1 of 1 , May 5 3:45 PM
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      The story ended with Part 3. This message contains some general information
      on this folk tale. As I explained previously, this story was told to us, as
      children; however, I wanted to just point out several other aspects of the
      tale, although they might be obvious:

      1. This story clearly was a way of telling of the hardship and oppression
      experienced in the "Old Country." It also allows those who are oppressed
      (or were) to tell of a time when one of their kind was victorious against
      great odds. It also clearly establishes through the use of frequent
      repetition of the adjectives "good" and "honest" who was on the honorable
      side. The fact that a magical creature is necessary to make the good man
      victorious is an indicator that the grip of the oppressors was very tight
      indeed.

      2. This story also follows the path of a "Resurrection Myth" as seen in many
      other cultures. Here we have, for all purposes, a man who is dead. When
      the good man is sent to the great pit. He is sent to his death. There
      then comes the intervention of a godly spirit. With the aid of this
      spirit, the man is reborn through his escape from the great pit. With
      great detail, we even have the man giving his flesh to be eaten. In truth,
      at this level, this is a highly sophisticated myth.

      3. In capturing this tale in writing, I have tried to retain some of the
      rhythms and speech patterns used when it was told. The written story
      will never have the same affect as when a real storyteller uses his voice
      to greatly enhance the "Swoosh...Swoosh...Swoosh!" of the wings of the great
      eagle and the great wind- swallowing "Gu-lump!" of the eagle asking for the
      lion meat. This story is best when told in a quiet setting and with a great
      deal of sound effects being provided by the storyteller including the
      "yeowls and snarls'' of the lions and the slashing sound of the good man's
      knife.

      I suppose that, at the current time, this story would be considered to
      graphic and gory to be told to children; however, I always listened
      intently, no matter how many times I had heard it before...and I never
      had nightmares about this tale.

      I am planning to start writing about the Joseph and Anna Svoboda Hrncir
      family who immigrated to Texas prior to the Civil War. I also need to
      capture the folk tale of "Spriritus" a wee man who takes on a wealthy
      nobleman in order to get food, clothing, and money for the oppressed
      peasants. If any of you would rather read one or the other, please e-mail me
      back and let me know your preference.

      Susan Rektorik Henley

      Kdo chce s vlky býti, musí s vlky výti!
      "If you run with the wolves, you must howl with the wolves!"
      "Remember who your people are, keep and tell their stories."
      "Keep the fires of the culture alive!"
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