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1880 Census spellings

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  • richardgarza1@juno.com
    Hi All, Just spent the last couple of days going through the 1880 US Census on-line for Austin County (birthplace of Czech immigration). I knew there d be a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 5, 2004
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      Hi All,
      Just spent the last couple of days going through the 1880 US
      Census on-line for Austin County (birthplace of Czech immigration). I
      knew there'd be a lot of households with a Czech but I was truly
      surprised at just how many there were. Driving around Austin County
      today, you wouldn't think it had such a sizeable population at one time.
      The spellings, of course, are atrocious. But don't get me wrong.
      I appreciate the fact that someone (volunteers?) took the time to try to
      attempt to decipher the handwriting of the 1880 census takers. It appears
      that many of the census takers either had a German background or knew a
      bit about the German language because many of the Czech names that have a
      "v" sound in them use a "w" for the "v". And those names with the "sh"
      sound often use the Germanic "sch" for the Czech "s" with a hacek. You'll
      also spot an Anglo-Irish census taker when you see a name that has a "k"
      sound but spelled with a "c". For example: Colockcheck. Remember - many
      of our ancestors were illiterate when they arrived. Only a few were able
      to help the census taker spell their names correctly.
      Another example of the difficulties you'll encounter when
      searching the on-line census is this household listing I found:
      Martin "Zopgick", b. 1824 in "Boheming" with wife "Francis" 33,
      and daughter Francis 22. Quite likely the name should be "ZABCIK" from
      "Bohemia," and Frantiska as the wife.
      Some listings even showed the country of birth as "Maelwen" for
      Moravia. Understandably, the transcriber had a problem with the
      handwritten, German spelling of "Mähren."
      The upshot of all this? It may be time-consuming but do go
      through each household record of the census if you are having a problem
      locating an ancestor who you know lived in a certain county but can't
      seem to locate.
      Rick Garza
      Sharing. It's what it's all about!
      http://www.texasczechs.homestead.com/

      .




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    • Willie Petruy
      When the Czech Heritage started, Grace Campbell Clowe and Albert Blaha extracted the Czechs from the Census in 1860,70,80 and 1900. Since Albert Blaha could
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 5, 2004
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        When the Czech Heritage started, Grace Campbell Clowe and Albert Blaha
        extracted the Czechs from the Census in 1860,70,80 and 1900. Since
        Albert Blaha could speak Czech, he was able to translate the atrocious
        spelling into the correct names in most cases. My favorite is Uritza
        which is Jurica. Carla Petruy

        -----Original Message-----
        From: richardgarza1@... [mailto:richardgarza1@...]
        Sent: Saturday, June 05, 2004 11:59 AM
        To: texasczechs@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [TexasCzechs] 1880 Census spellings


        Hi All,
        Just spent the last couple of days going through the 1880 US
        Census on-line for Austin County (birthplace of Czech immigration). I
        knew there'd be a lot of households with a Czech but I was truly
        surprised at just how many there were. Driving around Austin County
        today, you wouldn't think it had such a sizeable population at one time.

        The spellings, of course, are atrocious. But don't get me wrong.
        I appreciate the fact that someone (volunteers?) took the time to try to
        attempt to decipher the handwriting of the 1880 census takers. It
        appears that many of the census takers either had a German background or
        knew a bit about the German language because many of the Czech names
        that have a "v" sound in them use a "w" for the "v". And those names
        with the "sh" sound often use the Germanic "sch" for the Czech "s" with
        a hacek. You'll also spot an Anglo-Irish census taker when you see a
        name that has a "k" sound but spelled with a "c". For example:
        Colockcheck. Remember - many of our ancestors were illiterate when they
        arrived. Only a few were able to help the census taker spell their names
        correctly.
        Another example of the difficulties you'll encounter when
        searching the on-line census is this household listing I found:
        Martin "Zopgick", b. 1824 in "Boheming" with wife "Francis" 33,
        and daughter Francis 22. Quite likely the name should be "ZABCIK" from
        "Bohemia," and Frantiska as the wife.
        Some listings even showed the country of birth as "Maelwen" for
        Moravia. Understandably, the transcriber had a problem with the
        handwritten, German spelling of "Mähren."
        The upshot of all this? It may be time-consuming but do go
        through each household record of the census if you are having a problem
        locating an ancestor who you know lived in a certain county but can't
        seem to locate. Rick Garza Sharing. It's what it's all about!
        http://www.texasczechs.homestead.com/

        .




        ________________________________________________________________
        The best thing to hit the Internet in years - Juno SpeedBand! Surf the
        Web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER! Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to
        sign up today!



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      • richardgarza1@juno.com
        Hi Carla, Thanks for the info. That must have been a fun job for Blaha & Cloewe. The spellings are so bad I m still trying to guess at some of them - like
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 6, 2004
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          Hi Carla,
          Thanks for the info. That must have been a fun job for Blaha &
          Cloewe. The spellings are so bad I'm still trying to guess at some of
          them - like "Wutschetka" and "Gintax" <g>.
          Would you happen to have a map of the enumeration
          districts/precincts in Austin County?
          Rick Garza

          On Sat, 5 Jun 2004 14:00:13 -0400 "Willie Petruy" <wpetruy@...>
          writes:
          > When the Czech Heritage started, Grace Campbell Clowe and Albert
          > Blaha
          > extracted the Czechs from the Census in 1860,70,80 and 1900. Since
          > Albert Blaha could speak Czech, he was able to translate the
          > atrocious
          > spelling into the correct names in most cases. My favorite is
          > Uritza
          > which is Jurica. Carla Petruy
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

          ________________________________________________________________
          The best thing to hit the Internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
          Surf the Web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
          Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
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