Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Looking for a Czech clerical person in the Corpus Christi area

Expand Messages
  • CWarschak@aol.com
    Anita, At the risk of getting off subject I feel that it will be helpful if I share some information in regard to your inquiry about the possibility of
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 2, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
          Anita,
          At the risk of getting off subject I feel that it will be helpful if I share some information in regard to your inquiry about the possibility of locating a Czech Priest or minister to perform a wedding in the Corpus Christi area.  I think that you will probably find it very difficult to find a Catholic Priest who will perform the ceremony.
          A Catholic Priest does not just marry somebody because the two parties want to be married.  In order for a couple to be married by a Catholic Priest at least one of the parties must be a Catholic in good standing with the laws of the Catholic Church.  If the other party is not Catholic he/she must at least meet certain criteria as set out by the Catholic Church.  In some cases the circumstances must be presented to a tribunal which reviews the case and makes a decision regarding whether, or not, the couple can be married by a Catholic Priest. The tribunal asks a lot of questions and makes a decision only after thoroughly reviewing the circumstances of the two individuals wishing to be married.  It can become a long, drawn out affair. 
          Likewise, if a Catholic is a party to a marriage that is performed by a non-Catholic minister the Catholic cannot receive the sacraments of the Catholic Church until he/she has the marriage validated by the Catholic Church.  In an effort to accomode the non-Catholic party there are occasions where a Protestant minister is allowed to assist a Catholic priest in the marriage ceremony, however, the ceremony must be performed according to the Rites of Matrimony of the Catholic Church.  In cases of mixed marriages the party that is Catholic must agree to raise the children as Catholic. 
          I realize that this might sound harsh to those who do not understand the reasoning behind it. It goes back to uniqueness and universality of the Catholic Church.   The practices of the Roman Catholic Church are universal throughout the world. It doesn't matter whether you are in the U. S., the Czech Republic, China, Russia or whereever, the Catholic Mass is the same and the same rules of the Catholic Church apply.  The teachings of the Catholic Church as set out by Jesus Christ have been carried forward by a chain of 265 Popes - from St. Peter to our present Pope John Paul II.    By contrast, all Protestant religions were started by one or more individuals who felt that their ideas were superior to those of the Pope (the successor of Jesus Christ).
          Unfortunately, in today's secular world far too many people, including some Catholics, do not treat this and other matters with the seriousness that they deserve.  The fact remains, however, that  the Catholic religion is not a "cafeteria religion" (one in which the members  are allowed to pick and choose which parts of their religion they are willing to abide by) and the Church considers is a very serious matter for Catholics to not abide by all of the laws of their religion. 
          Anyone who feels that I have over-stepped the bounds of getting off subject please forgive me.  I don't ordinarily get into this sort of discussion but I feel that I am merely answering one aspect of a request from a fellow list member.  My point is to say that I don't think that you will find a Catholic priest who will perform the wedding unless he can verify that the parties are Catholics who are in good standing with the Catholic Church.     
       
          Carroll Warschak
    • werephish@yahoo.com
      Getting back on topic, one Wendish tradition was for the bride to be dressed in black, to symbolize the harsh struggle in life ahead. This traidtion has fallen
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 3, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Getting back on topic, one Wendish tradition was for the bride to be
        dressed in black, to symbolize the harsh struggle in life ahead.
        This traidtion has fallen out of use, but who knows, maybe you could
        give it some recognition by say black ribbon around the bouquet or
        something?
      • Mary J Heard
        That tradition was observed by the Moravians here in Texas also. My grandmother, the third daughter in a family of 8 daughters and 4 sons was the first in the
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 3, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          That tradition was observed by the Moravians here in Texas also. My
          grandmother, the third daughter in a family of 8 daughters and 4 sons was
          the first in the family to have a white wedding dress and veil. She was
          married in Burleson County in 1870. Her younger sisters also were married
          in white. The two older daughters had a very nice black dress that "was
          suitable for wearing to other events" where a "nice" dress was expected.

          Mary JKH
          mjhawhjr@...

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <werephish@...>
          To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, June 03, 2004 11:52 AM
          Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: Looking for a Czech clerical person in the Corpus
          Christi area


          > Getting back on topic, one Wendish tradition was for the bride to be
          > dressed in black, to symbolize the harsh struggle in life ahead.
          > This traidtion has fallen out of use, but who knows, maybe you could
          > give it some recognition by say black ribbon around the bouquet or
          > something?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Remember: You can alway set your account to Digest Mode for less mail.
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Nangotoo
          ... A Catholic Priest does not just marry somebody because the two parties want to be married.
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 4, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
             >>At the risk of getting off subject I feel that it will be helpful if I share some information in regard to your inquiry about the possibility of locating a Czech Priest or minister to perform a wedding in the Corpus Christi area.  I think that you will probably find it very difficult to find a Catholic Priest who will perform the ceremony.
                A Catholic Priest does not just marry somebody because the two parties want to be married. <<
             
             
            Most Protestant ministers will not marry someone off of the streets either or just because two people want to get married.  We had to attend 3 or 4 marriage classes where the minister gets to know the couple and counsels them.  He/she wants to be sure that the couple is prepared for marriage in the Christian tradition and knows what they are getting into and what their responsibilities in marriage are.  My husband and I were both baptized church members and we still had to go to classes with the pastor. Sio did my sisters when it was their turn to get married.  They had different ministers than we did.  That was 34 yrs ago for us.  I know that this happens in just about *every* denomination now.
             
            My niece and her fiance are getting married outside and not in a church.  They don't attend any church and therefore, do not know any ministers--even non-denominational ones.  They have looked and asked for a year and haven't been able to find a minister who will marry them. My sister married a man who is largely Native American, but not registered  in a tribe.  They have even tried to get a N.A. shaman to perform the ceremony and finally found one who is willing and who is also a justice of the peace, but most of them wouldn't do it without classes.  The wedding is in early July and they just found someone!  No Christian minister would touch it because neither one of them is baptized or a church attendee and neither one will express any strong beliefs.  So Carroll is correct not only about Catholics (which I was raised in, too), but about Protestant ministers, too. 
             
            Sorry to throw another bit of bad news into, but that is what we have found.
             
            Nan 
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.