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Asparagas on Grave--Fayetteville

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  • Susan Rektorik Henley
    Hello again, included with this message you should find a photo of a grave plot at the Fayetteville City Cemetery. The obelisk markers are for Marie and
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 29, 2003
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      Hello again, included with this message you should find a photo of a grave plot at the Fayetteville City Cemetery. The obelisk markers are for Marie and Frantisek Baca. The graves are in a curbed and graveled plot. What I found so fascinating is that the feathery growth in front of the graves is actual asparagus...not the asparagus fern but real asparagus. I first saw this at the Lutheran Church cemetery in Frielsburg but have since found it in numerous other folk cemeteries.
       
      Again, asparagus is an adapt ion for a current time and place of an age-old concept--rebirth and eternal life. Evergreen plants such as the asparagus fern and cedar are traditionally used as symbols of life eternal. Flowering bulbs that die and then are "rebirth" each spring also serve this purpose. And, apparently does true asparagus. The asparagus sprouts (spears) come up through the ground (and here the gravel) and open into the feathery growth of the plant. They will die back and then in the spring sprout again.
       
      The city cemetery at Fayetteville also has some incredibly ancient Crepe myrtles so old that the thin branches have grown together in great spirals.
       
      The Lutheran Cemetery at Frielsburg evidences a different cultural background than most of the Texas Czech-Moravian cemeteries. There one sees many large (and now very old) whelk shells mounded on graves and placed near markers. These shells usually represent the earth mother.
       
      Susan
    • Richard Kotrla
      Susan: Thank you for sharing this wonderful photo and story with us all. You continue to be a wealth of wonderful and fascinating information. I am sure I am
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 29, 2003
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        Susan:

        Thank you for sharing this wonderful photo and story with us all.
        You continue to be a wealth of wonderful and fascinating
        information. I am sure I am not alone in saying that I look with
        anticipation each day for new messages and new wonderful stories
        from you. Isn't the Fayetteville Cemetery a wonderful old
        cemetery? Like many others on the list, I have relatives buried
        there. I have spent many hours walking through the cemetery,
        looking at the markers, and trying to get a mental photograph of
        those buried there, relatives or not. I, too have taken many photos
        of the markers there. Thanks again for sharing.

        Richard Kotrla
        LaMarque, Texas

        --- In TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Rektorik Henley"
        <srektorik@h...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hello again, included with this message you should find a photo of
        a grave plot at the Fayetteville City Cemetery. The obelisk markers
        are for Marie and Frantisek Baca. The graves are in a curbed and
        graveled plot. What I found so fascinating is that the feathery
        growth in front of the graves is actual asparagus...not the
        asparagus fern but real asparagus. I first saw this at the Lutheran
        Church cemetery in Frielsburg but have since found it in numerous
        other folk cemeteries.
        >
        > Again, asparagus is an adapt ion for a current time and place of
        an age-old concept--rebirth and eternal life. Evergreen plants such
        as the asparagus fern and cedar are traditionally used as symbols of
        life eternal. Flowering bulbs that die and then are "rebirth" each
        spring also serve this purpose. And, apparently does true asparagus.
        The asparagus sprouts (spears) come up through the ground (and here
        the gravel) and open into the feathery growth of the plant. They
        will die back and then in the spring sprout again.
        >
        > The city cemetery at Fayetteville also has some incredibly ancient
        Crepe myrtles so old that the thin branches have grown together in
        great spirals.
        >
        > The Lutheran Cemetery at Frielsburg evidences a different cultural
        background than most of the Texas Czech-Moravian cemeteries. There
        one sees many large (and now very old) whelk shells mounded on
        graves and placed near markers. These shells usually represent the
        earth mother.
        >
        > Susan
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