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  • Pat Lyon
    This was in the Ancestry.com newsletter, which I rarely take time to read. I got a chuckle & thought you might too. A Norwalk citizen has discovered it. He
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 28, 2002
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      This was in the Ancestry.com newsletter, which I rarely take time to read.  I got a chuckle & thought you might too.
       
      A Norwalk citizen has discovered it. He takes the potato bug by the
      hind legs and holds him, head down, in a can of coal oil for twenty-
      four hours. It doesn't kill the bug but prevents him from eating the
      vines during the twenty-four hours.
      Remember that kerosene was called coal oil.  I've had a foot soaked in it several times for stepping on a nail.
       
      Pat
    • Gene Hirschman
      Thank you for this post. Now there are at least two people that have experienced the use of kerosene or coal-oil as a cure-all for cuts and wounds. I even
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 28, 2002
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        Thank you for this post.  Now there are at least two people that have experienced the use of kerosene or coal-oil as a cure-all for cuts and wounds.  I even had to take a spoonful of kerosene on top of sugar as cough medicine.  No one has ever believed these stories before.

        Pat Lyon wrote:

        This was in the Ancestry.com newsletter, which I rarely take time to read.  I got a chuckle & thought you might too. A Norwalk citizen has discovered it. He takes the potato bug by the
        hind legs and holds him, head down, in a can of coal oil for twenty-
        four hours. It doesn't kill the bug but prevents him from eating the
        vines during the twenty-four hours.Remember that kerosene was called coal oil.  I've had a foot soaked in it several times for stepping on a nail. Pat


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      • Shannon
        I missed most of this conversation but when I seen the kerosene I had to comment. My great grandfather was cured by kerosene. He had whooping cough or
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 28, 2002
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          I missed most of this conversation but when I seen the kerosene I had to
          comment.

          My great grandfather was cured by kerosene. He had whooping cough or
          something and his throat was swelling either a gypsy woman or an indian
          woman (depending on who is telling the story) took a stick and wrapped it
          with a rag and then dipped it in kerosene and swabbed his throat with
          it. It must of worked he lived to be a ripe old age. Guess what doesn't
          kill you only makes you stronger depending on how you look at it that could
          be the kerosene or the whooping cough.

          Shannon

          At 10:14 AM 4/28/02, you wrote:
          >Thank you for this post. Now there are at least two people that have
          >experienced the use of kerosene or coal-oil as a cure-all for cuts and
          >wounds. I even had to take a spoonful of kerosene on top of sugar as
          >cough medicine. No one has ever believed these stories before.
        • Mary Holy
          When I was about 5 years old, in the late 50s, I was playing with my brothers and sister when I stepped on a chopping hoe. I cut the bottom of my foot, all
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 28, 2002
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            When I was about 5 years old, in the late '50s, I was playing with my brothers and sister when I stepped on a chopping hoe.  I cut the bottom of my foot, all the way across and  the leader to my big toe.  I think that is what it is called. The muscle that makes your big toe move.  My mom poured kerosene on it to stop the bleeding.  Then they took me to the doctor and had it sewed up.  I don't remember it bleeding much after that.  The funny part is that my oldest brother was screaming that my guts where coming out of my foot.  It really wasn't funny at the time, but later on it was funny.
             
            Mary (Soukup) Holy
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Pat Lyon
            Sent: Sunday, April 28, 2002 11:45 AM
            Subject: [TexasCzechs] amusing

            This was in the Ancestry.com newsletter, which I rarely take time to read.  I got a chuckle & thought you might too.
             
            A Norwalk citizen has discovered it. He takes the potato bug by the
            hind legs and holds him, head down, in a can of coal oil for twenty-
            four hours. It doesn't kill the bug but prevents him from eating the
            vines during the twenty-four hours.
            Remember that kerosene was called coal oil.  I've had a foot soaked in it several times for stepping on a nail.
             
            Pat

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          • Marek Schimara
            My grandmother used to speak about kerosene as a cure for coughing and other respiratory problems. They used to eat it with cube of sugar she said. The taste
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 28, 2002
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              My grandmother used to speak about kerosene as a cure for coughing and other respiratory problems. They used to eat it with cube of sugar she said. The taste must be awful, but doctors were too expensive for them that times and it seemed to help...

              On Sun, 28 Apr 2002 21:30:37 -0500
              "Mary Holy" <mholy@...> wrote:

              > When I was about 5 years old, in the late '50s, I was playing with my brothers and sister when I stepped on a chopping hoe. I cut the bottom of my foot, all the way across and the leader to my big toe. I think that is what it is called. The muscle that makes your big toe move. My mom poured kerosene on it to stop the bleeding. Then they took me to the doctor and had it sewed up. I don't remember it bleeding much after that. The funny part is that my oldest brother was screaming that my guts where coming out of my foot. It really wasn't funny at the time, but later on it was funny.
              >
              > Mary (Soukup) Holy
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Pat Lyon
              > To: texasczechs@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Sunday, April 28, 2002 11:45 AM
              > Subject: [TexasCzechs] amusing
              >
              >
              > This was in the Ancestry.com newsletter, which I rarely take time to read. I got a chuckle & thought you might too.
              >
              > A Norwalk citizen has discovered it. He takes the potato bug by the
              > hind legs and holds him, head down, in a can of coal oil for twenty-
              > four hours. It doesn't kill the bug but prevents him from eating the
              > vines during the twenty-four hours.
              >
              > Remember that kerosene was called coal oil. I've had a foot soaked in it several times for stepping on a nail.
              >
              > Pat
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
              >
              >
            • Susan Rektorik Henley
              My Grandfather seemed to consider kerosene as the first line of treatment for many problems. And, as our house was within walking distance of his on our farm,
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 29, 2002
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                My Grandfather seemed to consider kerosene as the first line of treatment for many problems.
                 
                And, as our house was within walking distance of his on our farm, the grandchildren spent a great deal of time over at the place of our grandparents.  Grandpa was usually outside sitting in a medal yard chair in the shade. He kept a .22 rifle close at hand to shot sparrows that flocked to the tree oasis in the middle of miles of field. (He also kept cases of long-neck bottles of beer hidden around the wash house and other places. He would put several bottles in the chest freezer that was located in the wash house. From time to time, he would forget one was there and it would freeze and explode.  Then when Grandma went out to get something from the freezer she would find the shattered bottle and comment, "THAT man!"
                 
                Anyway, the old farmstead was a wonderful place at which  to be a kid. There wash the large barn with storage rooms and a stable; the old hog and sheep pens no longer used and grown up into a thicket of Chinese crab apple trees; the horse trough filled with large gold fish, the shade of the huge fig tree next to the cypress water cistern, etc.  Inevitably, one of us would get cut.  I recall being quite small and ripping a deep gash across a knee on rusty barb wire.  When Grandpa saw it, he set me down on an old wooden table outside the wash house and poured kerosene on it. I recall it burned like fire. The wound probably could have used stitches but none were made. I had a scar from the incident until a few years ago.
                 
                Another thing about my Grandpa was that he loved to fish. He would come back from fishing with a burlap sack of fish to be cleaned. The grandchildren would be summoned to "help" clean the fish and, all of a sudden, Grandpa would recall that he has something import to do (such as feeding the chickens) that just couldn't wait. Then, he would not be seen again until after all the fish were cleaned!
                 
                Once while we were cleaning fish, I was running to get something, fell, and slid into the edge of a door on a shed. It sliced a deep hole in my forehead. As soon as I stood up, I had blood in my eyes. I recall being dazed. My sister, Judy, saw me, ran to me, grabbed me up, and carried me down the dirt road many yards to our house. I was taken to the hospital and my forehead stitched up.
                 
                Years later when Judy and I discussed the incident, she told me she acted in the manner she did because she feared that Grandpa would "treat" my forehead wound with kerosene and it would leave a large scar.  You see, Judy, was an out-of-door kid too and on several occasions, Grandpa had treated her wounds with kerosene too.  It was her belief that although the kerosene stopped the bleeding, it also caused the wound to scar heavily...and she had large scars that would appear to evidence that.
                 
                Susan
              • barbi grl
                on that note...here you can buy coal (to eat) when you have an upset stomach or whatever. nasty, but seems to work! ...
                Message 7 of 8 , May 1, 2002
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                  on that note...here you can buy coal (to eat) when you
                  have an upset stomach or whatever. nasty, but seems to
                  work!

                  --- Gene Hirschman <hershey@...> wrote:
                  > Thank you for this post. Now there are at least two
                  > people that have
                  > experienced the use of kerosene or coal-oil as a
                  > cure-all for cuts and
                  > wounds. I even had to take a spoonful of kerosene
                  > on top of sugar as
                  > cough medicine. No one has ever believed these
                  > stories before.
                  >
                  > Pat Lyon wrote:
                  >
                  > > This was in the Ancestry.com newsletter, which I
                  > rarely take time to
                  > > read. I got a chuckle & thought you might too. A
                  > Norwalk citizen has
                  > > discovered it. He takes the potato bug by the
                  > > hind legs and holds him, head down, in a can of
                  > coal oil for twenty-
                  > > four hours. It doesn't kill the bug but prevents
                  > him from eating the
                  > > vines during the twenty-four hours.Remember that
                  > kerosene was called
                  > > coal oil. I've had a foot soaked in it several
                  > times for stepping on
                  > > a nail. Pat
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > > texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
                  > Terms of Service.
                  >
                  > --
                  > Hershey - Albuquerque, NM I Whistle While I
                  > Work;-)
                  > Badges of the World -
                  > http://www.spinn.net/~hershey/badges.htm
                  > Stupid Referee Tricks -
                  > http://www.spinn.net/~hershey/referees.htm
                  >
                  >


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                • Tricia Burt
                  That is funny! My Grandma Janecek did this, too. Kerosene was always the treatment of choice!! ... __________________________________________________ Do You
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 3, 2002
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                    That is funny! My Grandma Janecek did this, too.
                    Kerosene was always the treatment of choice!!


                    --- Susan Rektorik Henley <srektorik@...>
                    wrote:
                    > My Grandfather seemed to consider kerosene as the
                    > first line of treatment for many problems.
                    >
                    > And, as our house was within walking distance of his
                    > on our farm, the grandchildren spent a great deal of
                    > time over at the place of our grandparents. Grandpa
                    > was usually outside sitting in a medal yard chair in
                    > the shade. He kept a .22 rifle close at hand to shot
                    > sparrows that flocked to the tree oasis in the
                    > middle of miles of field. (He also kept cases of
                    > long-neck bottles of beer hidden around the wash
                    > house and other places. He would put several bottles
                    > in the chest freezer that was located in the wash
                    > house. From time to time, he would forget one was
                    > there and it would freeze and explode. Then when
                    > Grandma went out to get something from the freezer
                    > she would find the shattered bottle and comment,
                    > "THAT man!"
                    >
                    > Anyway, the old farmstead was a wonderful place at
                    > which to be a kid. There wash the large barn with
                    > storage rooms and a stable; the old hog and sheep
                    > pens no longer used and grown up into a thicket of
                    > Chinese crab apple trees; the horse trough filled
                    > with large gold fish, the shade of the huge fig tree
                    > next to the cypress water cistern, etc. Inevitably,
                    > one of us would get cut. I recall being quite small
                    > and ripping a deep gash across a knee on rusty barb
                    > wire. When Grandpa saw it, he set me down on an old
                    > wooden table outside the wash house and poured
                    > kerosene on it. I recall it burned like fire. The
                    > wound probably could have used stitches but none
                    > were made. I had a scar from the incident until a
                    > few years ago.
                    >
                    > Another thing about my Grandpa was that he loved to
                    > fish. He would come back from fishing with a burlap
                    > sack of fish to be cleaned. The grandchildren would
                    > be summoned to "help" clean the fish and, all of a
                    > sudden, Grandpa would recall that he has something
                    > import to do (such as feeding the chickens) that
                    > just couldn't wait. Then, he would not be seen again
                    > until after all the fish were cleaned!
                    >
                    > Once while we were cleaning fish, I was running to
                    > get something, fell, and slid into the edge of a
                    > door on a shed. It sliced a deep hole in my
                    > forehead. As soon as I stood up, I had blood in my
                    > eyes. I recall being dazed. My sister, Judy, saw me,
                    > ran to me, grabbed me up, and carried me down the
                    > dirt road many yards to our house. I was taken to
                    > the hospital and my forehead stitched up.
                    >
                    > Years later when Judy and I discussed the incident,
                    > she told me she acted in the manner she did because
                    > she feared that Grandpa would "treat" my forehead
                    > wound with kerosene and it would leave a large scar.
                    > You see, Judy, was an out-of-door kid too and on
                    > several occasions, Grandpa had treated her wounds
                    > with kerosene too. It was her belief that although
                    > the kerosene stopped the bleeding, it also caused
                    > the wound to scar heavily...and she had large scars
                    > that would appear to evidence that.
                    >
                    > Susan
                    >


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