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Freedom to Move Freely

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  • Richard Garza
    Hi Lois, There are many things we take for granted as citizens of the USA (at least for the time being). One of those things is the right to move about freely
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 21, 2002
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      Hi Lois,
      There are many things we take for granted as citizens of the USA
      (at least for the time being). One of those things is the right to move
      about freely from one city to the next or from one state to the next. Not
      so for our ancestors under Habsburg rule up until about 1848 when they
      gained some more freedoms.
      Dr. Simicek's reference to "becoming" a citizen of such and such
      a village by marriage is quite accurate and not a speech pattern.
      Although, were he to use the phraseology to describe a contemporary you
      could ascribe this to historical pattern. Depending on the time period,
      our ancestors were citizens of the empire (Austria) first and then a
      citizen of their specific kingdom, duchy, principality, etc. They were
      required to carry a pass at all times - a national identity card. This
      pass denoted the exact village to which an individual belonged. You
      couldn't just pack your belongings and move over to Frydek because your
      cousin said there was plenty of work to be had there. You would have to
      petition the administrative court to let you leave your old village and
      then you'd have to petition the new administrative court for permission
      to live there. Marriage to someone from another village didn't
      automatically grant you the right to citizenship in that village. You
      still had to apply for a permit/permission to live in that village.
      It was usually a mere formality when it came to citizenship
      through marriage but you still needed the permission and your pass had to
      show your new citizenship status in this new village. The Revolution(s)
      of 1848 changed much of this, but not fast enough to suit our ancestors.
      Now, just imagine. With the scare of Sep. 11 and all this talk of
      a national ID card we may just get the opportunity to know what life was
      like for our ancestors. <g>
      Rick Garza
      Sharing. It's what it's all about!
      http://www.texasczechs.homestead.com/

      .
      On Wed, 20 Mar 2002 16:16:31 -0600 Lois Pereira <> writes:
      > Now I have observed
      > several times in Dr. Simicek's book a phrase he uses a lot. This
      > being, he became a Frenstat citizen by the marriage to.... Could
      > it
      > just be a speech pattern and his way of saying that this is how he
      > came
      > to be in said city or was this literally the way to become a citizen
      > in said city? >
      >>
      >
      >>
      >

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    • darlenbaker@cs.com
      Rick, I did not know this stuff. Thanks for letting us know about this. IT really makes you cherish your FREEDOM. Darlene Baker In a message dated 03/21/2002
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 21, 2002
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        Rick,

        I did not know this stuff. Thanks for letting us know about this.
        IT really makes you cherish your FREEDOM.

        Darlene Baker

        In a message dated 03/21/2002 3:37:29 AM Central Standard Time, richardgarza1@... writes:


        Dr. Simicek's reference to "becoming" a citizen of such and such
        a village by marriage is quite accurate and not a speech pattern.
        Although, were he to use the phraseology to describe a contemporary you
        could ascribe this to historical pattern. Depending on the time period,
        our ancestors were citizens of the empire (Austria) first and then a
        citizen of their specific kingdom, duchy, principality, etc. They were


      • Lois Pereira
        Thanks so much. I should have known this but it never crossed my mind. I remember seeing the letters of permission to emigrate and the responses they
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 2, 2002
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          "Thanks so much. I should have known this but it never crossed my mind.
          I remember seeing the letters of permission to emigrate and the
          responses they received. If they went without an okay then the records
          would reflect "Escaped to America". That booklet that I took for Grandma
          and Grandpas passport was probably the citizen id card you spoke of.
          This is interesting.......lois

          Richard Garza wrote:

          > Hi Lois,
          > There are many things we take for granted as citizens of the
          > USA
          > (at least for the time being). One of those things is the right to
          > move
          > about freely from one city to the next or from one state to the next.
          > Not
          > so for our ancestors under Habsburg rule up until about 1848 when they
          >
          > gained some more freedoms.
          >
          >
          > .
          > On Wed, 20 Mar 2002 16:16:31 -0600 Lois Pereira <> writes:
          > > Now I have observed
          > > several times in Dr. Simicek's book a phrase he uses a lot. This
          > > being, he became a Frenstat citizen by the marriage to.... Could
          > > it
          > > just be a speech pattern and his way of saying that this is how he
          > > came
          > > to be in said city or was this literally the way to become a citizen
          >
          > > in said city? >
          > >>
          > >
          > >>
          > >
          >
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          --
          Lois Petter Pereira
          Researching Ahlhorn, Bokemeyer, Brdusik, Bruntrig, Cordes, Filges,
          Francis, Garney, Gebauer, Hadac, Hadash, Halla, Hauser, Hoelschel,
          Kaskie, Maciejewski, Manak, Nauger, Ollre, Orsag, Orsak, Otjen, Papiz,
          Pavlik, Pereira, Petter, Polasek, Pratka, Psencik, Rada, Rohan,
          Sablatura, Schaub, Schroeder, Slovack, Susil, Tiemann, Urban, Weiser.
          Home Page: http://ourczech.homestead.com/
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