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Re: [TexasCzechs] Texas Czech Demonstrations

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  • Joe Janecka
    ... We called them oskvarky with a hacek over the s . You folks have really been jogging my memory of the old times, ala 1940 s BE. (Before Electricity!)
    Message 1 of 17 , Feb 28, 2002
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      On Fri, 1 Mar 2002 07:30:03 -0800 (PST), you wrote:

      >Would that be something like oshkvadek?
      >
      >--- george patrick <GPATRICK@...> wrote:
      > I'm
      >> not sure if the term is Czech, English, or slang,
      >> but, we called the crispy pork skins "chitlins".
      >> Not only were they good eating, they were also used
      >> to make "cracklin bread".

      We called them "oskvarky" with a hacek over the 's'.

      You folks have really been jogging my memory of the old times, ala
      1940's BE. (Before Electricity!) And old men love to reminisce.

      It's "hog killin' time" and the Petters would come over to help us.
      They were our friends and the best sausage makers in the world.
      "Budem zabyjet prasata!"

      I won't repeat the process as everyone else has described adequately,
      but yes, I do remember the old black kettle, (which also doubled as a
      clothes washtub), pulling water out of the well by the bucketful,
      scraping the hog, etc.

      The rendered lard was not only used to make the homemade soap, but was
      used extensively in cooking. You haven't eaten fried chicken until
      you have eaten some skillet fried in "hog fat". Mm mm, good!
      This was in the days before Crisco, which precedes Canola and Olive
      oils. :-)) No wonder those people lived into their 90's.

      Sensitive folks please read no further. The rest of this is tough!!

      Sorry feminists, but the preparing of casings for sausage was
      "woman's" work. (This was the old days, remember?) Nah! Actually the
      men did the initial preparation, if you get what I mean. Then the
      ladies took over. Remember the carved wooden scrapers the ladies used?

      Hogs were not easy to dispatch. A 22 calibre is usually not powerful
      enough. Dad would open up a shotgun shell, melt the buckshot and cast
      it into a single slug. Then wrap it in silk cloth and re-load the
      shell. That worked every time. Quick knife work was next so the
      blood could be caught in a bowl and constantly stirred with salt so it
      wouldn't coagulate. This was later cooked with barley and spices,
      (and perhaps other stuff--I don't know the exact recipe), to make
      blood sausage which we called "jelita". (yell-e-ta).

      Several cookings were made in the kettle. First was the scalding
      water used to loosen the hair for scraping and washing the hog. Next
      was the cooking of the head, glands, etc. for the making of the head
      or liver sausage, whatever you want to call it. We called them
      jitrnice. (yee-trr-nyi-tse). Next came the cooking of the ears, feet,
      etc. for the making of head cheese, or "sultz' in Czech. Finally, of
      course, was the rendering of the lard.

      The hog was sectioned to recover the major cuts of meat, such as the
      hams, loins, ribs, bacon, jowl, and foreleg shanks. Meat scraps and
      sometimes the foreleg shanks were ground up for the regular sausage.
      This sausage was really the good stuff. I have yet to find any
      sausage, anywhere in Texas, as good as Albin or Joe Petter used to
      make. There is just no comparison. I wish I knew their recipes.

      Kids today would gag at what we found delicious back in the old days.
      Brains scrambled with eggs were usually for breakfast the day
      following "hog killin". (They don't keep long without refrigeration.)
      The next day's breakfast might be "sweet breads" with eggs. That's
      not pastry!) After the smoking process was over, the jowl was thick
      sliced and fried up like bacon for breakfast. Nothing better than
      fried jowl,"podbradek", homemade bread spread with thick sour cream,
      and homemade "melas", (molasses), for breakfast. And for dinner, which
      we ate at dinner time, not at supper time, we might have tripe soup,
      followed by tongue diced and cooked in a sour cream sauce, skillet
      fried potatoes and home-canned green beans. Good eating!!

      Of course, the dogs had a field day at hog killin time. They got all
      the droppings, excess fat, unedibles, etc. The cracklings that we
      didn't eat were saved to be cooked with ground corn meal as mush for
      the dogs. Store bought dog food was unheard of. The mush
      supplemented their diet of chicken heads, entrails, and an occasional
      rabbit they caught. They were tough!

      Oh well, chow time. Gotta go. Bon appetit!






      Cheers,
      Joe
      http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
    • Brian Mabry
      Would that be something like oshkvadek? ... I m ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Greetings - Send FREE e-cards for
      Message 2 of 17 , Mar 1 7:30 AM
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        Would that be something like oshkvadek?

        --- george patrick <GPATRICK@...> wrote:
        I'm
        > not sure if the term is Czech, English, or slang,
        > but, we called the crispy pork skins "chitlins".
        > Not only were they good eating, they were also used
        > to make "cracklin bread".
        >
        >

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      • Leona M. Urbish, Ph.D.
        Gilbert, This is exactly how we did it, down Hallettsville way. I can still taste that head sausage (without the blood). That was Daddy’s mixture and was
        Message 3 of 17 , Mar 1 8:20 AM
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          Gilbert,

           

          This is exactly how we did it, down Hallettsville way.  I can still taste that head sausage (without the blood).  That was Daddy’s mixture and was it good!

           

          Leona

           

          Leona M. Urbish, Ph.D., Director

          Office of Institutional Research

          Rice University

          P. O. Box 1892

          Houston, TX 77251-1892

          713-348-6258 (o) - 713-348-6252 (fax)

           

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Gilbert Bohuslav [mailto:bohuslav@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2002 9:41 PM
          To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Texas Czech Demonstrations

           

          George/Susan:  My recollection of hog butchering is a little different.  The hog was placed on a sled and pulled next to the black crock pot that was used to boil water.  My job as a young kid was to make sure the wood was split properly and the water was kept very hot.  We would dip the water out of the pot with wood handle buckets and pour it over the hog.  Then we would use knifes to scrape the hair off.  Finally using that hot water again to make sure it was clean.  When hung on the tree then again, hot water to clean.  After the hog was skinned we cut the rind into small pieces and put in the the hot water to make pork rinds (there is a czech word for that but I can remember--something like
          o-squar-kee).  I'd always have to taste some and usually ended up with a belly ache.

          We also took the head and used all the parts (eyes, ears, nose, jowl, etc) mixed it with either barley or rice and made head sausage (some poured blood into it and made blood sausage).  Again, hot water came into play.  Part of my job was to take the hogs intestines and clean them so we could use that to put the above mixture into it.  Again, a good name (something like e-ter-netsee).  Good stuff if you can stand the smell.  In fact, a friend of ours still makes them and we received 6 of them this week-end.

          My wife said she remembers "kobleke" but she said it was made from different dough, not kolache dough.  Cooked prunes were placed inside the dough and made into a round ball, then boiled in lard, then sprinkled with sugar and cinammon.  Wow was that good.  My wife asked me to ask if anyone has the receipe for making kobleke?????

          Gilbert Bohuslav
           

          george patrick wrote:

          Susan, As part of the pig butchering demo., please remind Richard of the "bladder ball" reward that the youngsters got for helping to gather wood to fuel the fire under the 55 gallon oil drum containing the boiling water into which the hog was lowered by block and tackle.  This dipping process was necessary in making it possible to scrape the hair from the skin.  The final use for the boiling water was to cleanse the pig's bladder so that it could be tied into a balloonlike ball and filled with air.  Never thought about it but, possibly, this may have been the original "pig skin" football. My 100 % Moravian father was always given the head of the hog from which he made "head cheese" and home-made chili.  He also did some things with the brain, tongue  and such which I will not get into here. He had his own way of making sauer kraut .  He kept a large ceramic container((probaby about 3 gallons or so) in the smokehouse.  He had an attachment for his sausage grinder in which he prepared cabbage--I remember turning the crank for him while he feed the cabbage into the grinder.  Next, in a large tub or bucket, he would have me scrub cucumbers until all of the "stickery" things were completely gone.  While I was doing that, he would be boiling a huge pot of salt water "brine SP".  When all was readied, he would layer the cabbage and cucumbers in the kraut crock, getting each layer just so.  When he finished that, he poured the boiling salt water over the mixture, placed a heavy dinner plate on top, and weighted it down with a large rock or brick.  The crock stayed in the smokehouse because my English mother wouldn't let him bring the stinky thing in the house.    To open that crock and reach down through the kraut and get one of those big, sour pickles was a far-more pleasant experience than going to the "Dairy Queen". My last memory of hog butchering was on my English grandfather's farm in Calhoun county.  His family had always been inn keepers but he always wanted to be a farmer.  He also always wanted to get things done very quickly.  Evidently, he had not prepared a good foundation for the 55 gallon drum of hot, boiling water to rest on securely.  As the hog was lowered into the boiling water, the drum tipped over on him, causing considerable burns.  Like true farmers, as soon as he was taken care of, the rest of the family finished the task.  He recovered but that was the last year anyone in the family butchered. One other suggestion.  Do you remember when the grandmothers made colaches they always seemed to have a bit of dough left over?  My grandmother patted this dough out into things about the size of a pancake.  She dropped the dough into a pot of hot, boiling "lard" for a few minutes.  When they were done they were a crispy brown.  She would drop them , one at a time, into a paper bag containing sugar and cinamon and shake them around for a second or two.  She would serve them to us while they were still hot and crispy.  I believe she called them "kobleke" , phoneticaly pronounced :  ko-blee-key. Have fun, George

          ----- Original Message -----

          Sent: Monday, February 25, 2002 6:46 PM

          Subject: [TexasCzechs] Texas Czech Demonstrations

           The Texas Czech Heritage and Cultural Center (TCHCC) is La Grange is looking for individuals who still carry the knowledge of the "old ways" for demonstrations at the TCHCC.  For instance, Richard Pavlicek, the President of the Travis and Williamson County Chapter of the CHS, is trying to obtain a "model" so he can demonstrate "scraping" and butchering a hog. Richard speaks fluent Czech and will intersperse Czech words in his presentation.  Yours truly, the ever adventurous, has volunteered to help Richard. We are also looking at having an operational forge and bellows going with my teen-age son operating it and casting "coins." Anybody on this list want to make Sauer kraut or egg noodles? We are also looking at my niece doing tatting demonstrations. The problem is that she currently lives in Colorado.  Does anyone on this list weave or crochet? I'll even provide a Radegast beer to anyone who conducts a demonstration at the October Czech Fest. Life is too short not to live it as a Texas Czech. Come on and have a little fun carrying forward our ethnic identity!Susan

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        • george patrick
          I don t know, brian. Sorry to say I don t know Czech. Perhaps someone else on the list may know. By the way, you said your Mother was from Rogers. What was
          Message 4 of 17 , Mar 1 9:09 AM
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            I don't know, brian. Sorry to say I don't know Czech. Perhaps someone
            else on the list may know.

            By the way, you said your Mother was from Rogers. What was her maiden name?

            George
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Brian Mabry" <brianmabry@...>
            To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, March 01, 2002 9:30 AM
            Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Texas Czech Demonstrations


            > Would that be something like oshkvadek?
            >
            > --- george patrick <GPATRICK@...> wrote:
            > I'm
            > > not sure if the term is Czech, English, or slang,
            > > but, we called the crispy pork skins "chitlins".
            > > Not only were they good eating, they were also used
            > > to make "cracklin bread".
            > >
            > >
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Yahoo! Greetings - Send FREE e-cards for every occasion!
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            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • Brian Mabry
            George, It was Pechal. Brian ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Greetings - Send FREE e-cards for every occasion!
            Message 5 of 17 , Mar 1 10:02 AM
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              George,
              It was Pechal.
              Brian



              --- george patrick <GPATRICK@...> wrote:
              > I don't know, brian. Sorry to say I don't know
              > Czech. Perhaps someone
              > else on the list may know.
              >
              > By the way, you said your Mother was from Rogers.
              > What was her maiden name?
              >
              > George
              >

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            • Mary Holy
              Where did Albin and Joe Petter live? Mary (Soukup) Holy ... From: Joe Janecka To: Sent: Friday, March
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 1 11:28 AM
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                Where did Albin and Joe Petter live?
                Mary (Soukup) Holy

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Joe Janecka" <a0010631@...>
                To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, March 01, 2002 1:21 AM
                Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Texas Czech Demonstrations


                > On Fri, 1 Mar 2002 07:30:03 -0800 (PST), you wrote:
                >
                > >Would that be something like oshkvadek?
                > >
                > >--- george patrick <GPATRICK@...> wrote:
                > > I'm
                > >> not sure if the term is Czech, English, or slang,
                > >> but, we called the crispy pork skins "chitlins".
                > >> Not only were they good eating, they were also used
                > >> to make "cracklin bread".
                >
                > We called them "oskvarky" with a hacek over the 's'.
                >
                > You folks have really been jogging my memory of the old times, ala
                > 1940's BE. (Before Electricity!) And old men love to reminisce.
                >
                > It's "hog killin' time" and the Petters would come over to help us.
                > They were our friends and the best sausage makers in the world.
                > "Budem zabyjet prasata!"
                >
                > I won't repeat the process as everyone else has described adequately,
                > but yes, I do remember the old black kettle, (which also doubled as a
                > clothes washtub), pulling water out of the well by the bucketful,
                > scraping the hog, etc.
                >
                > The rendered lard was not only used to make the homemade soap, but was
                > used extensively in cooking. You haven't eaten fried chicken until
                > you have eaten some skillet fried in "hog fat". Mm mm, good!
                > This was in the days before Crisco, which precedes Canola and Olive
                > oils. :-)) No wonder those people lived into their 90's.
                >
                > Sensitive folks please read no further. The rest of this is tough!!
                >
                > Sorry feminists, but the preparing of casings for sausage was
                > "woman's" work. (This was the old days, remember?) Nah! Actually the
                > men did the initial preparation, if you get what I mean. Then the
                > ladies took over. Remember the carved wooden scrapers the ladies used?
                >
                > Hogs were not easy to dispatch. A 22 calibre is usually not powerful
                > enough. Dad would open up a shotgun shell, melt the buckshot and cast
                > it into a single slug. Then wrap it in silk cloth and re-load the
                > shell. That worked every time. Quick knife work was next so the
                > blood could be caught in a bowl and constantly stirred with salt so it
                > wouldn't coagulate. This was later cooked with barley and spices,
                > (and perhaps other stuff--I don't know the exact recipe), to make
                > blood sausage which we called "jelita". (yell-e-ta).
                >
                > Several cookings were made in the kettle. First was the scalding
                > water used to loosen the hair for scraping and washing the hog. Next
                > was the cooking of the head, glands, etc. for the making of the head
                > or liver sausage, whatever you want to call it. We called them
                > jitrnice. (yee-trr-nyi-tse). Next came the cooking of the ears, feet,
                > etc. for the making of head cheese, or "sultz' in Czech. Finally, of
                > course, was the rendering of the lard.
                >
                > The hog was sectioned to recover the major cuts of meat, such as the
                > hams, loins, ribs, bacon, jowl, and foreleg shanks. Meat scraps and
                > sometimes the foreleg shanks were ground up for the regular sausage.
                > This sausage was really the good stuff. I have yet to find any
                > sausage, anywhere in Texas, as good as Albin or Joe Petter used to
                > make. There is just no comparison. I wish I knew their recipes.
                >
                > Kids today would gag at what we found delicious back in the old days.
                > Brains scrambled with eggs were usually for breakfast the day
                > following "hog killin". (They don't keep long without refrigeration.)
                > The next day's breakfast might be "sweet breads" with eggs. That's
                > not pastry!) After the smoking process was over, the jowl was thick
                > sliced and fried up like bacon for breakfast. Nothing better than
                > fried jowl,"podbradek", homemade bread spread with thick sour cream,
                > and homemade "melas", (molasses), for breakfast. And for dinner, which
                > we ate at dinner time, not at supper time, we might have tripe soup,
                > followed by tongue diced and cooked in a sour cream sauce, skillet
                > fried potatoes and home-canned green beans. Good eating!!
                >
                > Of course, the dogs had a field day at hog killin time. They got all
                > the droppings, excess fat, unedibles, etc. The cracklings that we
                > didn't eat were saved to be cooked with ground corn meal as mush for
                > the dogs. Store bought dog food was unheard of. The mush
                > supplemented their diet of chicken heads, entrails, and an occasional
                > rabbit they caught. They were tough!
                >
                > Oh well, chow time. Gotta go. Bon appetit!
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Cheers,
                > Joe
                > http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
                >
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >
              • Joe Janecka
                ... Albin lived just a little south of West and Joe lived about 2 miles SW of Abbott. Cheers, Joe http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
                Message 7 of 17 , Mar 1 5:29 PM
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                  On Fri, 1 Mar 2002 13:28:06 -0600, you wrote:

                  >Where did Albin and Joe Petter live?
                  >Mary (Soukup) Holy

                  Albin lived just a little south of West and Joe lived about 2 miles SW
                  of Abbott.
                  Cheers,
                  Joe
                  http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
                • Joe Janecka
                  ... Whoops! I meant 2 miles southeast of Abbott. Cheers, Joe http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
                  Message 8 of 17 , Mar 1 6:00 PM
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                    On Fri, 01 Mar 2002 19:29:09 -0600, you wrote:

                    >>Where did Albin and Joe Petter live?
                    >>Mary (Soukup) Holy
                    >
                    >Albin lived just a little south of West and Joe lived about 2 miles SW
                    >of Abbott.

                    Whoops! I meant 2 miles southeast of Abbott.
                    Cheers,
                    Joe
                    http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
                  • Anita Berka
                    Joe, Speaking as a city girl, you are one sick puppy! :-) Sounds like all you folks who are recollecting had wonderfully full childhoods. Anita
                    Message 9 of 17 , Mar 1 6:47 PM
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                      Joe,

                      Speaking as a city girl, you are one sick puppy! :-) Sounds like all
                      you folks who are recollecting had wonderfully full childhoods.

                      Anita
                    • Joe Janecka
                      ... You must be Evelyn s daughter? Small world. Mother and daddy used to play a lot of 42 and Straight with Joe and Anna when we lived near Abbott.
                      Message 10 of 17 , Mar 2 12:08 AM
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                        On Sat, 2 Mar 2002 10:59:24 -0600, you wrote:

                        >Joe
                        >What a small world. Joe Petter was my (Staricek) grandfather.

                        You must be Evelyn's daughter? Small world. Mother and daddy used to
                        play a lot of "42' and "Straight" with Joe and Anna when we lived
                        near Abbott.

                        Cheers,
                        Joe
                        http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
                      • Mary Holy
                        Joe What a small world. Joe Petter was my (Staricek) grandfather. The last time I remember my Staricek butchering, would have been maybe in the late 50 s, I
                        Message 11 of 17 , Mar 2 8:59 AM
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                          Joe
                          What a small world. Joe Petter was my (Staricek) grandfather. The last
                          time I remember my Staricek butchering, would have been maybe in the late
                          50's, I was a small child then and remember them coming into the house for a
                          container to catch the blood. Saying they needed it for the blood sausage.
                          I thought that was pretty gross at my age. But knowing my (Starenka)
                          grandmother she fixed it someway and we ate it. Cause Starenka never made
                          anything that we didn't like. Hopefully I spelled Staricek and Starenka
                          right. That's all I knew them as all my life, till I was much older and
                          realized that it meant they where my grandparents.
                          Some where in my mind, I remember something about some Janecka people coming
                          to their house off and on. But that has been so long ago. My Staricek has
                          been gone almost 29 years now.
                          Mary (Soukup) Holy
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "Joe Janecka" <a0010631@...>
                          To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Friday, March 01, 2002 8:00 PM
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Texas Czech Demonstrations


                          > On Fri, 01 Mar 2002 19:29:09 -0600, you wrote:
                          >
                          > >>Where did Albin and Joe Petter live?
                          > >>Mary (Soukup) Holy
                          > >
                          > >Albin lived just a little south of West and Joe lived about 2 miles SW
                          > >of Abbott.
                          >
                          > Whoops! I meant 2 miles southeast of Abbott.
                          > Cheers,
                          > Joe
                          > http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
                          >
                          >
                          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                          > texasczechs-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • Mary Holy
                          Joe Yes, I am Evelyn s daughter. After I think about it, I believe I remember you coming with them a few times. I don t remember your dad real well, but I
                          Message 12 of 17 , Mar 2 12:52 PM
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                            Joe
                            Yes, I am Evelyn's daughter. After I think about it, I believe I remember
                            you coming with them a few times. I don't remember your dad real well, but
                            I remember your mom. I always thought she had a real strong Czech accent.
                            But of course my Starenka spoke mainly Czech, I really don't remember
                            saying any English. My Staricek spoke mainly Czech with a little English.
                            Most of the time my mom would tell us what they said, if they thought we
                            needed to know. I guess the reason my mom and dad didn't teach us Czech,
                            was because when Mom started to school, she only knew how to speak Czech.
                            She had a hard time learning English when she started to school. We did
                            learn a little Czech.

                            I remember them playing "42" and "Straight". We always had to be quite, if
                            we where visiting. They had two rocking chairs in the back bedroom, that
                            where always brought into the living room, when they had company, to play
                            "42" and "Straight". I now own one of those special rocking chairs.

                            Mary (Soukup) Holy


                            > >Joe
                            > >What a small world. Joe Petter was my (Staricek) grandfather.
                            >
                            > You must be Evelyn's daughter? Small world. Mother and daddy used to
                            > play a lot of "42' and "Straight" with Joe and Anna when we lived
                            > near Abbott.
                            >
                            > Cheers,
                            > Joe
                            > http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
                            >
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