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Re: hog butchering & TCH demos

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  • Pat Lyon
    I was too young to be included in the hog butchering when we did it. They tried to keep the kids out of the way. I can remember helping turn the meat grinder
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 28, 2002
      I was too young to be included in the hog butchering when we did it. They
      tried to keep the kids out of the way. I can remember helping turn the meat
      grinder for sausage. And I always loved the "cracklin's" as we called the
      fried chips. Nothing better than fresh sausage. I suspect ours was made
      the German way as it was generally the Sommerfeld side who participated.
      Zion United C of C here in Womack has a sausage supper every year the
      Saturday after Thanksgiving and it is very popular. You used to be able to
      buy the left-over sausage but there rarely is any left over nowadays. The
      Church members butcher & make fresh sausage just for the supper every year.

      Susan, sad to say, I have no unique talents or skills related to the Czech
      traditions. I hope to get to come to the festival and enjoy learning.

      Pat
    • Edward Kadlecek
      I had to get into this when I saw Womack , sausage supper and hog butcherin . Marlene and I will be moving to Laguna Park in July when I retire and we are
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 28, 2002
        I had to get into this when I saw "Womack", "sausage supper" and "hog
        butcherin'".
        Marlene and I will be moving to Laguna Park in July when I retire and we are
        looking forward to transferring our Hermann's Sons membership to Womack
        Lodge, going to sausage suppers, seeing some of our Norwegian friends in the
        area whom we meet at the Texas Folklife Festival every year (and other
        venues)and meeting new friends in the area.
        I do remember the hog butchering as a kid (it also reminds me how old I
        am). On the farm outside Temple (Double-Header) at butcherin time (usually
        after the first good freeze)our job was to SCRAPE the hog, then wash the
        casings, turn the grinder, go hang meat in the smokehouse, etc. (now
        commonly called "gofers"). Fond memories really since later in the evening
        when it was completed my cousins and I dug up our wine down by the well that
        we helped make with Grampa, got the home grown tobacco out of the hidin'
        place, made our real corn cob pipes, and went and had one whale of a time
        out behind the barn.
        A lot of people say that these weren't really the good ol' days but if
        they weren't, I missed the real ones somewhere.
        K

        >From: "Pat Lyon" <patsroar@...>
        >Reply-To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
        >To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
        >Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: hog butchering & TCH demos
        >Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 13:25:36 -0600
        >
        >I was too young to be included in the hog butchering when we did it. They
        >tried to keep the kids out of the way. I can remember helping turn the
        >meat
        >grinder for sausage. And I always loved the "cracklin's" as we called the
        >fried chips. Nothing better than fresh sausage. I suspect ours was made
        >the German way as it was generally the Sommerfeld side who participated.
        >Zion United C of C here in Womack has a sausage supper every year the
        >Saturday after Thanksgiving and it is very popular. You used to be able to
        >buy the left-over sausage but there rarely is any left over nowadays. The
        >Church members butcher & make fresh sausage just for the supper every year.
        >
        >Susan, sad to say, I have no unique talents or skills related to the Czech
        >traditions. I hope to get to come to the festival and enjoy learning.
        >
        >Pat
        >




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      • Joe Janecka
        ... Rumpled cedar bark was my tobacco. Had to roll it in tablet paper since dad smoked a pipe and didn t have cigarette papers I could snitch. Were we cool or
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 28, 2002
          On Fri, 1 Mar 2002 11:35:35 -0600, George wrote:

          > My cousins and I collected what they left in soda
          >bottles and broke off some of the chewing tobacco someone accidently left on
          >the porch and, that was what we took to the barn. Somehow, looking back, I
          >think they knew what we were doing???
          >
          >Happy Retirement,
          >
          >George

          Rumpled cedar bark was my tobacco. Had to roll it in tablet paper
          since dad smoked a pipe and didn't have cigarette papers I could
          snitch.

          Were we cool or what?
          Cheers,
          Joe
          http://www.geocities.com/goodolejoe
        • barbi grl
          same here...too young to help out at the time, but people thinks it s rather odd when i tell them i have family photos of us butcherin hogs! (all the kids
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 1, 2002
            same here...too young to help out at the time, but
            people thinks it's rather odd when i tell them i have
            family photos of us butcherin' hogs! (all the kids
            crowed round holdin' glass bottle sodapops...great
            stuff)

            --- Pat Lyon <patsroar@...> wrote:
            > I was too young to be included in the hog butchering
            > when we did it. They
            > tried to keep the kids out of the way. I can
            > remember helping turn the meat
            > grinder for sausage. And I always loved the
            > "cracklin's" as we called the
            > fried chips. Nothing better than fresh sausage. I
            > suspect ours was made
            > the German way as it was generally the Sommerfeld
            > side who participated.
            > Zion United C of C here in Womack has a sausage
            > supper every year the
            > Saturday after Thanksgiving and it is very popular.
            > You used to be able to
            > buy the left-over sausage but there rarely is any
            > left over nowadays. The
            > Church members butcher & make fresh sausage just for
            > the supper every year.
            >
            > Susan, sad to say, I have no unique talents or
            > skills related to the Czech
            > traditions. I hope to get to come to the festival
            > and enjoy learning.
            >
            > Pat
            >
            >


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          • george patrick
            Edward, I was born in Rogers which is just a few miles outside of Temple. My father s people were Stepan, Petrek, Zabcik, among others. My family moved to
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 1, 2002
              Edward,

              I was born in Rogers which is just a few miles outside of Temple. My
              father's people were Stepan, Petrek, Zabcik, among others. My family moved
              to Calhoun Co. when I was very young but we returned to Bell County a couple
              of times a year to visit my Grandmother Petrek who lived on a farm in
              Edgeworth. Although my family changed Petrek to Patrick shortly after I was
              born, my father never gave up his Czech ways. For that, I do owe him a debt
              of graditude.

              We didn't have access to wine or smoking tobacco but , as you know, Czech
              men are neat. When they finish a beer they don't toss the bottles away.
              They replaced the empties in the case. Seems like they always left a few
              sips in the empty. My cousins and I collected what they left in soda
              bottles and broke off some of the chewing tobacco someone accidently left on
              the porch and, that was what we took to the barn. Somehow, looking back, I
              think they knew what we were doing???

              Happy Retirement,

              George
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Edward Kadlecek" <kadlecekej@...>
              To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2002 3:03 PM
              Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: hog butchering & TCH demos


              >
              > I had to get into this when I saw "Womack", "sausage supper" and "hog
              > butcherin'".
              > Marlene and I will be moving to Laguna Park in July when I retire and we
              are
              > looking forward to transferring our Hermann's Sons membership to Womack
              > Lodge, going to sausage suppers, seeing some of our Norwegian friends in
              the
              > area whom we meet at the Texas Folklife Festival every year (and other
              > venues)and meeting new friends in the area.
              > I do remember the hog butchering as a kid (it also reminds me how old
              I
              > am). On the farm outside Temple (Double-Header) at butcherin time (usually
              > after the first good freeze)our job was to SCRAPE the hog, then wash the
              > casings, turn the grinder, go hang meat in the smokehouse, etc. (now
              > commonly called "gofers"). Fond memories really since later in the evening
              > when it was completed my cousins and I dug up our wine down by the well
              that
              > we helped make with Grampa, got the home grown tobacco out of the hidin'
              > place, made our real corn cob pipes, and went and had one whale of a time
              > out behind the barn.
              > A lot of people say that these weren't really the good ol' days but
              if
              > they weren't, I missed the real ones somewhere.
              > K
              >
              > >From: "Pat Lyon" <patsroar@...>
              > >Reply-To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
              > >To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
              > >Subject: [TexasCzechs] Re: hog butchering & TCH demos
              > >Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 13:25:36 -0600
              > >
              > >I was too young to be included in the hog butchering when we did it.
              They
              > >tried to keep the kids out of the way. I can remember helping turn the
              > >meat
              > >grinder for sausage. And I always loved the "cracklin's" as we called
              the
              > >fried chips. Nothing better than fresh sausage. I suspect ours was made
              > >the German way as it was generally the Sommerfeld side who participated.
              > >Zion United C of C here in Womack has a sausage supper every year the
              > >Saturday after Thanksgiving and it is very popular. You used to be able
              to
              > >buy the left-over sausage but there rarely is any left over nowadays.
              The
              > >Church members butcher & make fresh sausage just for the supper every
              year.
              > >
              > >Susan, sad to say, I have no unique talents or skills related to the
              Czech
              > >traditions. I hope to get to come to the festival and enjoy learning.
              > >
              > >Pat
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > _________________________________________________________________
              > Join the world's largest e-mail service with MSN Hotmail.
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              >
              >
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              >
              >
              >
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              >
              >
            • richardkotrla
              I remember butchering hogs at my Grandpa Kristof s place outside Caldwell. I was pretty young, but I still remember the activities. I too got to crank the
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 1, 2002
                I remember butchering hogs at my Grandpa Kristof's place outside
                Caldwell. I was pretty young, but I still remember the activities.
                I too got to crank the sausage grinder. I also got to rinse out the
                casings, formerly known as intestines when they were in the now-
                deceased hog. I believed my dad and grandpa used a sledgehammer
                applied to exactly the right spot to killd the hog. Homemade
                sausage...none better. I do have fond memories, and would like to
                do it again, just for the memories.

                Richard Kotrla

                --- In TexasCzechs@y..., "Pat Lyon" <patsroar@h...> wrote:
                > I was too young to be included in the hog butchering when we did
                it.
              • miladyolga@aol.com
                Richard, I also have fond memories of hog butchering but knowing that this Sunday the weather is going to be in the 20 s at night would be a good time to hang
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 1, 2002
                  Richard,
                      I also have fond memories of hog butchering but knowing that this Sunday the weather is going to be in the 20's at night would be a good time to hang the hog from the block and tackle in the largest tree in the yard and complete the work the next day.  We would kill several in one day and it was an all day affair.  I think everyone should have that big black pot in their back yard as a reminder.  Knowing that the weather is going to be so cold this Sunday I don't think I'm ready to go back and freeze outside doing all that work.  And it was alot of work.  Sounds like this topic has alot of us going down memory lane.  Those were the days.....
                • richardkotrla
                  Debra: Your mention of the block and tackle brought back memories in regard to that. I do believe that s how the poor hog who met his death for us was strung
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 2, 2002
                    Debra:

                    Your mention of the block and tackle brought back memories in regard
                    to that. I do believe that's how the poor hog who met his death for
                    us was strung up. I have fond memories of the smokeshouse. That had
                    to be the best smelling place. We would go in there and just soak up
                    the aroma. Someone talked about processing chickens. I remember
                    chopping a few heads off and then boiling them in preparation of
                    picking the feathers off. Never did like that job as I always left a
                    few on and got hollered at.

                    Richard

                    --- In TexasCzechs@y..., miladyolga@a... wrote:
                    > Richard,
                    > I also have fond memories of hog butchering but knowing that
                    this Sunday
                    > the weather is going to be in the 20's at night would be a good
                    time to hang
                    > the hog from the block and tackle in the largest tree in the yard
                    and
                    > complete the work the next day.
                  • Edward Kadlecek
                    George; I know where Rogers is located. I dated a girl from there. I m also familiar with Zabcikville and Radibar (sic?)where we took the cotton to gin, swam
                    Message 9 of 11 , Mar 4, 2002
                      George;
                      I know where Rogers is located. I dated a girl from there. I'm also
                      familiar with Zabcikville and Radibar (sic?)where we took the cotton to gin,
                      swam in the tank and had a "big red" soda before the trek back to the farm
                      on the empty wagon behind the tractor. Nothing like a full moon on the way
                      back through the countryside.
                      Our wine at butcherin' time was what we could sneak out from Grandpa's
                      batch made earlier from Mustang (or Muscadyne) grapes that grew wild in the
                      pasture and along the fence line. My cousins and I did the pickin' under
                      Grandpa's direction from below which was directed in Czech and enforced with
                      a willow branch (switch ??). We too used soda bottles to put it in with wax
                      paper around whittled wood stoppers to cap it. Burying it down by the well
                      was the coolest spot for it.
                      Grandpa grew his tobacco for the whole family there on the black land
                      farm above the vegetable garden. After curing, our job was to clean and cut
                      the leafs, then roll cigarettes in an old TARGET Cigarette rolling machine
                      (how many of you remember those ??)for all of our dads and uncles. Grandpa
                      only smoked a beautiful old pipe brought with him from Czechoslovakia. We
                      wore out many of the rolling belts on that machine and of course, managed to
                      get plenty of leavins' for ourselves.
                      One other thing on the hog butchering - - (I loved the tongue stew,
                      "across the belly", jetrnisse (sic?) and brains and eggs too but few believe
                      we actually did this) we storaged a lot of it in the big ceramic crocks
                      packed in the lard. Each crock at home back in the city had it's own paper
                      index of what was in it and where. Our job ?? Mom told us what to go get
                      when she wanted to prepare it. Everything was prepared with lard. When I was
                      checked in 96 for cholestoral, it registered 386. I had a triple bypass
                      shortly thereafter. I still love it !!!
                      P.S. CURLY's Meat Market down by the old MKT terminal in Temple still has
                      (had?) good Czech liver sausage.
                      Ed

                      >From: "george patrick" <GPATRICK@...>
                      >Reply-To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                      >To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
                      >Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: hog butchering & TCH demos
                      >Date: Fri, 1 Mar 2002 11:35:35 -0600
                      >
                      >Edward,
                      >
                      >I was born in Rogers which is just a few miles outside of Temple. My
                      >father's people were Stepan, Petrek, Zabcik, among others. My family moved
                      >to Calhoun Co. when I was very young but we returned to Bell County a
                      >couple
                      >of times a year to visit my Grandmother Petrek who lived on a farm in
                      >Edgeworth. Although my family changed Petrek to Patrick shortly after I
                      >was
                      >born, my father never gave up his Czech ways. For that, I do owe him a
                      >debt
                      >of graditude.
                      >
                      >We didn't have access to wine or smoking tobacco but , as you know, Czech
                      >men are neat. When they finish a beer they don't toss the bottles away.
                      >They replaced the empties in the case. Seems like they always left a few
                      >sips in the empty. My cousins and I collected what they left in soda
                      >bottles and broke off some of the chewing tobacco someone accidently left
                      >on
                      >the porch and, that was what we took to the barn. Somehow, looking back, I
                      >think they knew what we were doing???
                      >
                      >Happy Retirement,
                      >
                      >George




                      _________________________________________________________________
                      MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos:
                      http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx
                    • Brian Mabry
                      Anyone ever hear of eating hog s blood and rice together? I know someone mentioned blood sausage earlier. My mom says that s what some people used to do.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Mar 5, 2002
                        Anyone ever hear of eating hog's blood and rice
                        together? I know someone mentioned blood sausage
                        earlier. My mom says that's what some people used to
                        do. *shudders at the thought* :)


                        --- Edward Kadlecek <kadlecekej@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > George;
                        > I know where Rogers is located. I dated a girl
                        > from there. I'm also
                        > familiar with Zabcikville and Radibar (sic?)where we
                        > took the cotton to gin,
                        > swam in the tank and had a "big red" soda before the
                        > trek back to the farm
                        > on the empty wagon behind the tractor. Nothing like
                        > a full moon on the way
                        > back through the countryside.
                        > Our wine at butcherin' time was what we could
                        > sneak out from Grandpa's
                        > batch made earlier from Mustang (or Muscadyne)
                        > grapes that grew wild in the
                        > pasture and along the fence line. My cousins and I
                        > did the pickin' under
                        > Grandpa's direction from below which was directed in
                        > Czech and enforced with
                        > a willow branch (switch ??). We too used soda
                        > bottles to put it in with wax
                        > paper around whittled wood stoppers to cap it.
                        > Burying it down by the well
                        > was the coolest spot for it.
                        > Grandpa grew his tobacco for the whole family
                        > there on the black land
                        > farm above the vegetable garden. After curing, our
                        > job was to clean and cut
                        > the leafs, then roll cigarettes in an old TARGET
                        > Cigarette rolling machine
                        > (how many of you remember those ??)for all of our
                        > dads and uncles. Grandpa
                        > only smoked a beautiful old pipe brought with him
                        > from Czechoslovakia. We
                        > wore out many of the rolling belts on that machine
                        > and of course, managed to
                        > get plenty of leavins' for ourselves.
                        > One other thing on the hog butchering - - (I
                        > loved the tongue stew,
                        > "across the belly", jetrnisse (sic?) and brains and
                        > eggs too but few believe
                        > we actually did this) we storaged a lot of it in the
                        > big ceramic crocks
                        > packed in the lard. Each crock at home back in the
                        > city had it's own paper
                        > index of what was in it and where. Our job ?? Mom
                        > told us what to go get
                        > when she wanted to prepare it. Everything was
                        > prepared with lard. When I was
                        > checked in 96 for cholestoral, it registered 386. I
                        > had a triple bypass
                        > shortly thereafter. I still love it !!!
                        > P.S. CURLY's Meat Market down by the old MKT
                        > terminal in Temple still has
                        > (had?) good Czech liver sausage.
                        > Ed
                        >
                        > >From: "george patrick" <GPATRICK@...>
                        > >Reply-To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                        > >To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
                        > >Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: hog butchering & TCH
                        > demos
                        > >Date: Fri, 1 Mar 2002 11:35:35 -0600
                        > >
                        > >Edward,
                        > >
                        > >I was born in Rogers which is just a few miles
                        > outside of Temple. My
                        > >father's people were Stepan, Petrek, Zabcik, among
                        > others. My family moved
                        > >to Calhoun Co. when I was very young but we
                        > returned to Bell County a
                        > >couple
                        > >of times a year to visit my Grandmother Petrek who
                        > lived on a farm in
                        > >Edgeworth. Although my family changed Petrek to
                        > Patrick shortly after I
                        > >was
                        > >born, my father never gave up his Czech ways. For
                        > that, I do owe him a
                        > >debt
                        > >of graditude.
                        > >
                        > >We didn't have access to wine or smoking tobacco
                        > but , as you know, Czech
                        > >men are neat. When they finish a beer they don't
                        > toss the bottles away.
                        > >They replaced the empties in the case. Seems like
                        > they always left a few
                        > >sips in the empty. My cousins and I collected what
                        > they left in soda
                        > >bottles and broke off some of the chewing tobacco
                        > someone accidently left
                        > >on
                        > >the porch and, that was what we took to the barn.
                        > Somehow, looking back, I
                        > >think they knew what we were doing???
                        > >
                        > >Happy Retirement,
                        > >
                        > >George
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        _________________________________________________________________
                        > MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print
                        > your photos:
                        > http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx
                        >
                        >


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                      • george patrick
                        Yak Se Mas, Ed, My brother and I stopped at the Kolache Kitchen in Temple on the way to visit my mom and that was on the door as we went in. I think it means
                        Message 11 of 11 , Mar 10, 2002
                          Yak Se Mas, Ed,

                          My brother and I stopped at the Kolache Kitchen in Temple on the way to
                          visit my mom and that was on the door as we went in. I think it means How
                          Are You? or something like that.

                          If I recall, in front of the gin at Zabcikville was a little beer joint. As
                          you walk in the front door and turn right, down the hall, and turn right
                          again, you enter a small room about the size of a walk-in closet. There was
                          the nickle slot machine into which I put many mickles while my dad drank
                          beer with his old friends and relatives. The cotton farmer who leased my
                          grandmothers farm had his cotton ginned at the Co-op gin in Edgeworth. I'm
                          not real sure but I've heard it said that my GG Grandfather, Jan Zabcik, had
                          something to do with starting that gin at Zabcikville. His daughter, Marie,
                          married my G Grandfather, Martin Stepan, and their oldest child, Mary, is
                          my grandmother. My dad was born at his uncle's house, John and Lucy
                          Stepan, a bit down the road from Zabcikville in Ocker. Uncle John was a
                          farmer and minister who founded the Ocker Luthern Church.

                          I enjoyed the memories. Keep in touch.

                          George
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "Edward Kadlecek" <kadlecekej@...>
                          To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Monday, March 04, 2002 1:24 PM
                          Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: hog butchering & TCH demos


                          >
                          >
                          > George;
                          > I know where Rogers is located. I dated a girl from there. I'm also
                          > familiar with Zabcikville and Radibar (sic?)where we took the cotton to
                          gin,
                          > swam in the tank and had a "big red" soda before the trek back to the farm
                          > on the empty wagon behind the tractor. Nothing like a full moon on the way
                          > back through the countryside.
                          > Our wine at butcherin' time was what we could sneak out from
                          Grandpa's
                          > batch made earlier from Mustang (or Muscadyne) grapes that grew wild in
                          the
                          > pasture and along the fence line. My cousins and I did the pickin' under
                          > Grandpa's direction from below which was directed in Czech and enforced
                          with
                          > a willow branch (switch ??). We too used soda bottles to put it in with
                          wax
                          > paper around whittled wood stoppers to cap it. Burying it down by the well
                          > was the coolest spot for it.
                          > Grandpa grew his tobacco for the whole family there on the black land
                          > farm above the vegetable garden. After curing, our job was to clean and
                          cut
                          > the leafs, then roll cigarettes in an old TARGET Cigarette rolling machine
                          > (how many of you remember those ??)for all of our dads and uncles. Grandpa
                          > only smoked a beautiful old pipe brought with him from Czechoslovakia. We
                          > wore out many of the rolling belts on that machine and of course, managed
                          to
                          > get plenty of leavins' for ourselves.
                          > One other thing on the hog butchering - - (I loved the tongue stew,
                          > "across the belly", jetrnisse (sic?) and brains and eggs too but few
                          believe
                          > we actually did this) we storaged a lot of it in the big ceramic crocks
                          > packed in the lard. Each crock at home back in the city had it's own paper
                          > index of what was in it and where. Our job ?? Mom told us what to go get
                          > when she wanted to prepare it. Everything was prepared with lard. When I
                          was
                          > checked in 96 for cholestoral, it registered 386. I had a triple bypass
                          > shortly thereafter. I still love it !!!
                          > P.S. CURLY's Meat Market down by the old MKT terminal in Temple still has
                          > (had?) good Czech liver sausage.
                          > Ed
                          >
                          > >From: "george patrick" <GPATRICK@...>
                          > >Reply-To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
                          > >To: <TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com>
                          > >Subject: Re: [TexasCzechs] Re: hog butchering & TCH demos
                          > >Date: Fri, 1 Mar 2002 11:35:35 -0600
                          > >
                          > >Edward,
                          > >
                          > >I was born in Rogers which is just a few miles outside of Temple. My
                          > >father's people were Stepan, Petrek, Zabcik, among others. My family
                          moved
                          > >to Calhoun Co. when I was very young but we returned to Bell County a
                          > >couple
                          > >of times a year to visit my Grandmother Petrek who lived on a farm in
                          > >Edgeworth. Although my family changed Petrek to Patrick shortly after I
                          > >was
                          > >born, my father never gave up his Czech ways. For that, I do owe him a
                          > >debt
                          > >of graditude.
                          > >
                          > >We didn't have access to wine or smoking tobacco but , as you know, Czech
                          > >men are neat. When they finish a beer they don't toss the bottles away.
                          > >They replaced the empties in the case. Seems like they always left a few
                          > >sips in the empty. My cousins and I collected what they left in soda
                          > >bottles and broke off some of the chewing tobacco someone accidently left
                          > >on
                          > >the porch and, that was what we took to the barn. Somehow, looking back,
                          I
                          > >think they knew what we were doing???
                          > >
                          > >Happy Retirement,
                          > >
                          > >George
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
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