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Re: [TeslaTurbine] Just an idea...

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  • DeLesley Hutchins
    I found a decent discussion of modern aluminum processing techniques at: http://electrochem.cwru.edu/ed/encycl/art-a01-al-prod.htm Aluminum is currently
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 16, 2002
      I found a decent discussion of modern aluminum processing techniques at:

      http://electrochem.cwru.edu/ed/encycl/art-a01-al-prod.htm

      Aluminum is currently produced in a two-stage process. The Bayer process is
      first used to extract pure aluminum oxide (alumina/corundum/sapphire) from
      bauxite ore. Any aluminum hydroxide is calcined to remove the water -- so
      it doesn't look like aluminum hydroxide is currently used directly as part
      of the manufacturing process.

      Aluminum oxide is then converted to aluminum via electrolysis in a bath of
      molten cryolite. This involves large amounts of both heat and electricity.
      The current method uses consumable carbon annodes, which creates the
      reaction alumina + carbon => aluminum + carbon dioxide. This is somewhat
      disappointing, since it means that a "zero emissions" vehicle would really
      just transfer emissions to the processing plant. However, there are a
      number of non-carbon annodes currently undergoing research, which would
      result in an "emissionless" alumina => aluminum + oxygen reaction.

      I still haven't found any way to process aluminum oxide or hydroxide in my
      kitchen. :-)

      -DeLesley
    • McGalliard, Frederick B
      Hi. Just looked it up in my old inorganic chemistry text. You could try dissolving the hydroxide in hydrochloric acid, then cooking off the liquid. The solid
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 17, 2002
        Hi. Just looked it up in my old inorganic chemistry text. You could try
        dissolving the hydroxide in hydrochloric acid, then cooking off the liquid.
        The solid aluminum chloride left, perhaps with sodium chloride and sodium
        carbonate could make a low enough melting electrolyte to allow simple
        electrolysis, perhaps a bit like what Bunsen used in 1854? I note that the
        commercial processes use a lot of very high temperature steps and include a
        lot of fluorides. I am not too sure I would want to do that in a home
        reactant recovery process.

        -----Original Message-----
        From: DeLesley Hutchins [mailto:hutchins@...]
        Sent: Sunday, June 16, 2002 9:17 AM
        To: TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [TeslaTurbine] Just an idea...



        I found a decent discussion of modern aluminum processing techniques at:

        http://electrochem.cwru.edu/ed/encycl/art-a01-al-prod.htm

        Aluminum is currently produced in a two-stage process. The Bayer process is
        first used to extract pure aluminum oxide (alumina/corundum/sapphire) from
        bauxite ore. Any aluminum hydroxide is calcined to remove the water -- so
        it doesn't look like aluminum hydroxide is currently used directly as part
        of the manufacturing process.

        Aluminum oxide is then converted to aluminum via electrolysis in a bath of
        molten cryolite. This involves large amounts of both heat and electricity.
        The current method uses consumable carbon annodes, which creates the
        reaction alumina + carbon => aluminum + carbon dioxide. This is somewhat
        disappointing, since it means that a "zero emissions" vehicle would really
        just transfer emissions to the processing plant. However, there are a
        number of non-carbon annodes currently undergoing research, which would
        result in an "emissionless" alumina => aluminum + oxygen reaction.

        I still haven't found any way to process aluminum oxide or hydroxide in my
        kitchen. :-)

        -DeLesley







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