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RE: [TeslaTurbine] Information wanted

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  • McGalliard, Frederick B
    Hi Mike. Sonic steam. Reminds me of the short movie of stage separation on the Saturn 5. The second stage pulls away from the interstage, the H2 O2 rockets
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 28, 2002
      Hi Mike. Sonic steam. Reminds me of the short movie of stage separation on
      the Saturn 5. The second stage pulls away from the interstage, the H2 O2
      rockets blasting like crazy but totally invisible steam is all that comes
      out, till the interstage slips into the stream and fire flashes all along
      it. Sure, steam can go supersonic. You just need enough pressure and a high
      enough temperature. At a rough guess you will need around 400 PSI. The
      nozzle converts the heat/pressure into velocity so the exit steam is much
      cooler and will condense unless it is superheated. For a TT you may not care
      if it condenses a little, since the droplets will not impact the blades as
      they do in a standard turbine, but you don't want to have too much
      condensation. It would get in the way of the gas flow.

      The 1/2 V maximum is, I think, the point where the turbine produces the most
      power. The most efficiency is much closer to V.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Mike Passerotti [mailto:mpasserotti@...]
      ...
      Is there a possibility of sonic speeds with steam? I don't remember seeing
      that anywhere.
      ...
      Maximum torque transfer from the fluid to disk is reported to be when the
      fluid is traveling 2 times the speed of the disk.
    • the_maniacal_engineer
      for sonic flow Ptot/P = (1+ M^2 *(gama -1)/2)^(gamma/(gamma-1)) gamma is the ratio of Cp/Cv M is the mach number Ptot is total pressure P is free stream
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 28, 2002
        for sonic flow

        Ptot/P = (1+ M^2 *(gama -1)/2)^(gamma/(gamma-1))

        gamma is the ratio of Cp/Cv
        M is the mach number
        Ptot is total pressure
        P is free stream pressure

        you can find the Cp and Cv by looking up the properties in steam
        tables Cp = dh/dT and Cv = d(h-Pv)/dt. There is an excel spreadsheet
        add in that will give the values you need. Its called either
        "water.xla" or "wasser.xla"

        Chris


        --- In TeslaTurbine@y..., "McGalliard, Frederick B"
        <frederick.b.mcgalliard@B...> wrote:
        > Hi Mike. Sonic steam. Reminds me of the short movie of stage
        separation on
        > the Saturn 5. The second stage pulls away from the interstage, the
        H2 O2
        > rockets blasting like crazy but totally invisible steam is all that
        comes
        > out, till the interstage slips into the stream and fire flashes all
        along
        > it. Sure, steam can go supersonic. You just need enough pressure and
        a high
        > enough temperature. At a rough guess you will need around 400 PSI.
        The
        > nozzle converts the heat/pressure into velocity so the exit steam is
        much
        > cooler and will condense unless it is superheated. For a TT you may
        not care
        > if it condenses a little, since the droplets will not impact the
        blades as
        > they do in a standard turbine, but you don't want to have too much
        > condensation. It would get in the way of the gas flow.
        >
        > The 1/2 V maximum is, I think, the point where the turbine produces
        the most
        > power. The most efficiency is much closer to V.
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Mike Passerotti [mailto:mpasserotti@m...]
        > ...
        > Is there a possibility of sonic speeds with steam? I don't remember
        seeing
        > that anywhere.
        > ...
        > Maximum torque transfer from the fluid to disk is reported to be
        when the
        > fluid is traveling 2 times the speed of the disk.
      • Mike Passerotti
        Thanks everyone. Have a happy Easter. Mike Passerotti
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 29, 2002
          Thanks everyone. Have a happy Easter.

          Mike Passerotti
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