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See through working model

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  • Mike Passerotti
    Howdy group! I m 2 weeks away from having my own garage. A long time dream about to come true. I won t have to clear my work bench (dining room table) every
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 9, 2001
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      See through working model

      Howdy group!

      I'm 2 weeks away from having my own garage.  A long time dream about to come true.  I won't have to clear my work bench (dining room table) every time for a meal.  So now I want to make a scale working model of my turbine design using clear plastic.  That should also help flesh out some difficulties in the design and point to improvements without much expense.  I plan on using a 2 liter soda bottle as an air tank on my desk as the energy imput.  I could take it up to 110 psi.  I'm thinking on using metal disks on the runners about 3" in diameter.

      Problem:  I'm thinking that even as a demo unit the power output of this thing would be more than enough.  What do I do with the output to demonstrate the power?  Do I use a 6" bar and a fish scale showing the stall torque?  Do mount an electric motor and use it as a generator showing the electric power output?  Do I use a gear reducer and mount a wheel to make a small car powered by air?

      This will be my first construction of a TT.  I've been paying attention to all the details.  Any suggestions on the desk top demonstration model would be greatly appreciated.

      Does anyone have the calculation of the work (energy) potential of a 2 liter volume filled with compressed air at 110 psi?

      Mike Passerotti - Software Engineer
      MedPlus Web Development Team
      8805 Governor's Hill Drive, Suite 100
      Cincinnati, OH 45249
      (513) 697-3200 xt 350
      (513) 583-8885 Fax
      mpasserotti@...

    • Joel Florian
      One question Mike -- Are you sure that a soda bottle will be able to hold 110 psi? I suspect that an average pop bottle would fail at around 50 psi. Joel,
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 9, 2001
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        One question Mike -- Are you sure that a soda bottle will be able to hold
        110 psi? I suspect that an average pop bottle would fail at around 50 psi.

        Joel,
        Alaska


        At 09:42 AM 7/9/01 -0400, you wrote:

        >Howdy group!
        >
        >I'm 2 weeks away from having my own garage. A long time dream about to
        >come true. I won't have to clear my work bench (dining room table) every
        >time for a meal. So now I want to make a scale working model of my
        >turbine design using clear plastic. That should also help flesh out some
        >difficulties in the design and point to improvements without much
        >expense. I plan on using a 2 liter soda bottle as an air tank on my desk
        >as the energy imput. I could take it up to 110 psi. I'm thinking on
        >using metal disks on the runners about 3" in diameter.
        >
        >Problem: I'm thinking that even as a demo unit the power output of this
        >thing would be more than enough. What do I do with the output to
        >demonstrate the power? Do I use a 6" bar and a fish scale showing the
        >stall torque? Do mount an electric motor and use it as a generator
        >showing the electric power output? Do I use a gear reducer and mount a
        >wheel to make a small car powered by air?
        >
        >This will be my first construction of a TT. I've been paying attention to
        >all the details. Any suggestions on the desk top demonstration model
        >would be greatly appreciated.
        >
        >Does anyone have the calculation of the work (energy) potential of a 2
        >liter volume filled with compressed air at 110 psi?
        >
        >Mike Passerotti - Software Engineer
        >MedPlus Web Development Team
        >8805 Governor's Hill Drive, Suite 100
        >Cincinnati, OH 45249
        >(513) 697-3200 xt 350
        >(513) 583-8885 Fax
        >mpasserotti@...
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
        ><http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      • Mike Passerotti
        I launch water rockets using soda bottles. They are pressure rated to 130 psi with failures going as high as 180 psi. They hold a lot of energy. They can
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 9, 2001
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          RE: [TeslaTurbine] See through working model

          I launch water rockets using soda bottles.  They are pressure rated to 130 psi with failures going as high as 180 psi.  They hold a lot of energy.  They can push a rocket body, fins and nose cone over 200 g's off the launch pad at speeds approaching 200 mph.  I'm sure.

          I'm thinking that with a TT and a 2liter air tank I could easily out do AirHogs' piston powered car.

          Mike Passerotti - Software Engineer
          MedPlus Web Development Team
          8805 Governor's Hill Drive, Suite 100
          Cincinnati, OH 45249
          (513) 697-3200 xt 350
          (513) 583-8885 Fax
          mpasserotti@...


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Joel Florian [mailto:joflo@...]
          Sent: Monday, July 09, 2001 1:01 PM
          To: TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [TeslaTurbine] See through working model


          One question Mike -- Are you sure that a soda bottle will be able to hold
          110 psi?  I suspect that an average pop bottle would fail at around 50 psi.

          Joel,
          Alaska


          At 09:42 AM 7/9/01 -0400, you wrote:

          >Howdy group!
          >
          >I'm 2 weeks away from having my own garage.  A long time dream about to
          >come true.  I won't have to clear my work bench (dining room table) every
          >time for a meal.  So now I want to make a scale working model of my
          >turbine design using clear plastic.  That should also help flesh out some
          >difficulties in the design and point to improvements without much
          >expense.  I plan on using a 2 liter soda bottle as an air tank on my desk
          >as the energy imput.  I could take it up to 110 psi.  I'm thinking on
          >using metal disks on the runners about 3" in diameter.
          >
          >Problem:  I'm thinking that even as a demo unit the power output of this
          >thing would be more than enough.  What do I do with the output to
          >demonstrate the power?  Do I use a 6" bar and a fish scale showing the
          >stall torque?  Do mount an electric motor and use it as a generator
          >showing the electric power output?  Do I use a gear reducer and mount a
          >wheel to make a small car powered by air?
          >
          >This will be my first construction of a TT.  I've been paying attention to
          >all the details.  Any suggestions on the desk top demonstration model
          >would be greatly appreciated.
          >
          >Does anyone have the calculation of the work (energy) potential of a 2
          >liter volume filled with compressed air at 110 psi?
          >
          >Mike Passerotti - Software Engineer
          >MedPlus Web Development Team
          >8805 Governor's Hill Drive, Suite 100
          >Cincinnati, OH 45249
          >(513) 697-3200 xt 350
          >(513) 583-8885 Fax
          >mpasserotti@...
          >
          >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
          ><http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>Yahoo! Terms of Service.


           

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

        • wyzed
          Joel the fish scale sounds like the easiest way to go and cheaper as well , it will give torque as well power out put. I am using the same it works fine
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 10, 2001
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            Joel the fish scale sounds like the easiest way to go and cheaper as well ,
            it will give torque as well power out put.
            I am using the same it works fine although I have fully completed a few mods
            to it. The local University [college] uses this method to demonstrate to the
            students, so I figured it would be good enough for me.
            regards Neil
          • wyzed
            Mike, Sorry I addressed the previous message to Joel. I agree with Joel I worked for number of years in the packaging industry and I would be real nervous
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 10, 2001
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              Mike, Sorry I addressed the previous message to Joel. I agree with Joel I
              worked for number of years in the packaging industry and I would be real
              nervous around a P.E.T. soda pop bottle with 100 psi or so in it.
              Try an old fuel tank from a kerosene stove or lantern or a pressure tank
              from trucks brake system.
              Hope this helps
              Neil
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