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Re: Sandia free-piston oscillator and RMS

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  • Parodydude@xxx.xxx
    In a message dated 12/16/99 1:18:48 AM Pacific Standard Time, ... Internal combustion engines run on two different scavenging principals, 2 stroke cycle and
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 16, 1999
      In a message dated 12/16/99 1:18:48 AM Pacific Standard Time,
      bernclay@... writes:

      > "Combustion occurs alternately at each end of the piston and a modern
      > two-stroke cycle scavenging process is used." (Anybody knows what
      > two-stroke cycle scavenging is exactly?)
      >

      Internal combustion engines run on two different 'scavenging' principals, 2
      stroke cycle and 4 stroke cycle. In order to run, all internal combustion
      engines use a combination of these 4 actions:
      Intake/compression/power/exhaust. Some engines use 4 oscillations of the
      piston to achieve these actions, others use 2. Either 4 stroke cycle, or 2
      stroke cycle.


      1.
      A two stroke cycle engine works by combining the intake and compression
      stroke into one movement of the piston toward the combustion chamber. Then,
      the power stroke and the exhaust stroke are combined into one movement of the
      piston away from the combustion chamber. . In Sandia's ocillating piston
      engine, it looks like a two stroke cycle principal. Older Detroit Diesel
      engines, and a wide veriety of small engines are 2 stroke cycle engines.


      Most automobile gasoline engines and caterpillar, cummins diesel engines are
      4 stroke cycle engines. Intake gas is sucked into the cylinder with a
      downward movement of the piston, increasing the cylinder's volume creating a
      low pressure area for the air/fuel to move into. this is the intake stroke.
      The air/fuel is then compressed in an upward movement of the cylinder. This
      is the compression stroke. Then the fuel ignites, either through pressure and
      heat, or through a spark from a spark plug. The burning fuel causes the air
      in the cylinder to become superheated and expand, pushing the cylinder
      downward. This is the power stroke. Finally, the spent combustion gases are
      pushed from the cylinder by an upward movement of the piston. Hope this
      helps.

      Tony
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