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RE: [TeslaTurbine] Re: Turbine Build Project

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  • McGalliard, Frederick B
    ... These are, I think, long range molecular attraction, which grabs the gas at the surface, and shear behavior in the gas itself which constructs the rest of
    Message 1 of 37 , Sep 29, 2005
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      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: William Carr [mailto:Jkirk3279@...]
      ...
      > I thought the point was to prevent friction heating as much
      > as possible when pumping.
      ...
      > By being so highly polished, the blocks are close enough
      > together for the Weak Atomic Force to start pulling on each other.

      These are, I think, long range molecular attraction, which grabs the gas
      at the surface, and shear behavior in the gas itself which constructs
      the rest of the boundary layer. The dimpled golf ball flys further
      because it reduces the friction/drag, by aerodynamic processes I really
      have not studied. I just thought they may help, at least for low
      velocity gas flow. Probably not at supersonic flow rates though.

      WRT friction. The drag force results in friction losses in a normal way,
      but in this case, the friction force actually does the work we want done
      on the blades. It is turbulance that turns the gas velocity into heat
      and loss of energy. No idea how sensitive the drag coefficients are to
      the actual disk surface material. I know it is sensitive to the gas
      used. Probably CO2 would work better than air (the strong bipolar
      molecule should grab pretty good. Steam is probably better.).
    • McGalliard, Frederick B
      ... These are, I think, long range molecular attraction, which grabs the gas at the surface, and shear behavior in the gas itself which constructs the rest of
      Message 37 of 37 , Sep 29, 2005
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        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: William Carr [mailto:Jkirk3279@...]
        ...
        > I thought the point was to prevent friction heating as much
        > as possible when pumping.
        ...
        > By being so highly polished, the blocks are close enough
        > together for the Weak Atomic Force to start pulling on each other.

        These are, I think, long range molecular attraction, which grabs the gas
        at the surface, and shear behavior in the gas itself which constructs
        the rest of the boundary layer. The dimpled golf ball flys further
        because it reduces the friction/drag, by aerodynamic processes I really
        have not studied. I just thought they may help, at least for low
        velocity gas flow. Probably not at supersonic flow rates though.

        WRT friction. The drag force results in friction losses in a normal way,
        but in this case, the friction force actually does the work we want done
        on the blades. It is turbulance that turns the gas velocity into heat
        and loss of energy. No idea how sensitive the drag coefficients are to
        the actual disk surface material. I know it is sensitive to the gas
        used. Probably CO2 would work better than air (the strong bipolar
        molecule should grab pretty good. Steam is probably better.).
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