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Introduction and thoughts

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  • vger62003
    Hello everyone. I have recently become interested in the Tesla turbine while looking for a possible power source that could be used in the wild that would be
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 19, 2005
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      Hello everyone. I have recently become interested in the Tesla
      turbine while looking for a possible power source that could be used
      in the wild that would be very quiet in operation. I'm thinking of
      using steam to drive the turbine in a closed cycle. Recondensing the
      steam to water would create a partial vacuum to help exhaust the steam
      from the turbine. While considering materials to use for the turbine
      I happened to glance a small stack of hard drive disks pulled from
      some 3.5" drives. Nice smooth mirror finish, extreemly flat, well
      machined etc. They are about .030" thick. I'm not sure they will
      withstand 30 to 40 KRPM though. A larger disk would turn slower of
      course. I wish to modify a vacuum cleaner motor to be a DC generator
      by disconnecting the two field coils and bring their leads out to use
      as excitation. I'll have to build a regulator circuit to supply the
      excitation current to the field, and tap the output from the brushes.

      Looks like a good group, with a few exceptions (advertisers)
    • Reese
      ... I was also considering hard drive data platters for a turbine, though I sought out some older 5.25 drives and was going to use those. I hoped to drive the
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 20, 2005
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        At 14:32 19-08-05 +0000, vger62003 wrote:

        >from the turbine. While considering materials to use for the turbine
        >I happened to glance a small stack of hard drive disks pulled from
        >some 3.5" drives. Nice smooth mirror finish, extreemly flat, well
        >machined etc. They are about .030" thick. I'm not sure they will

        I was also considering hard drive data platters for a turbine, though
        I sought out some older 5.25" drives and was going to use those. I
        hoped to drive the turbine with a suitable motor and use it as an
        air source for an air brush, perhaps other things depending on the
        performance once it is benchmarked. I thought somewhere between 10k
        and 30k rpm would give suitable results, of course the assembly would
        need proper anti-shock mounting and a very good scatter shield in case
        the platters decided to disassemble themselves.

        >course. I wish to modify a vacuum cleaner motor to be a DC generator
        >by disconnecting the two field coils and bring their leads out to use
        >as excitation. I'll have to build a regulator circuit to supply the
        >excitation current to the field, and tap the output from the brushes.

        I'm very curious about modifying an electrical motor that way, can
        you provide details and/or pictures?

        Reese
      • Reese
        ... I take it, the answer is no? You cannot (or will not) elaborate? Reese
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 11, 2005
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          At 11:46 20-08-05 -0400, Reese wrote:
          >At 14:32 19-08-05 +0000, vger62003 wrote:

          >>course. I wish to modify a vacuum cleaner motor to be a DC generator
          >>by disconnecting the two field coils and bring their leads out to use
          >>as excitation. I'll have to build a regulator circuit to supply the
          >>excitation current to the field, and tap the output from the brushes.
          >
          >I'm very curious about modifying an electrical motor that way, can
          >you provide details and/or pictures?

          I take it, the answer is no? You cannot (or will not) elaborate?

          Reese
        • Leslie Sutch
          what about using a battery type electric hand drill . take out the battery and spin the chuck and measure the voltage out put from the motor? try other
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 11, 2005
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            what about using a battery type electric hand drill . take out the battery
            and spin the chuck and measure the voltage out put from the motor? try other
            rechargeable tools spin the motor and see the results on a multimeter.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Reese" <reeza@...>
            To: <TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, September 11, 2005 12:19 PM
            Subject: Re: [TeslaTurbine] Introduction and thoughts


            > At 11:46 20-08-05 -0400, Reese wrote:
            >>At 14:32 19-08-05 +0000, vger62003 wrote:
            >
            >>>course. I wish to modify a vacuum cleaner motor to be a DC generator
            >>>by disconnecting the two field coils and bring their leads out to use
            >>>as excitation. I'll have to build a regulator circuit to supply the
            >>>excitation current to the field, and tap the output from the brushes.
            >>
            >>I'm very curious about modifying an electrical motor that way, can
            >>you provide details and/or pictures?
            >
            > I take it, the answer is no? You cannot (or will not) elaborate?
            >
            > Reese
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > No virus found in this incoming message.
            > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
            > Version: 7.0.344 / Virus Database: 267.10.21/96 - Release Date: 10/09/2005
            >
            >
          • vger62003
            ... Reese, Sorry I did not answer, lots of stuff taking up time, laptop motherboard failure, vacation, work etc... About the vacuum cleaner motor mod, if you
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 26, 2005
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              --- In TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com, Reese <reeza@f...> wrote:
              > >I'm very curious about modifying an electrical motor that way, can
              > >you provide details and/or pictures?
              >
              > I take it, the answer is no? You cannot (or will not) elaborate?
              >
              > Reese

              Reese,
              Sorry I did not answer, lots of stuff taking up time, laptop
              motherboard failure, vacation, work etc...

              About the vacuum cleaner motor mod, if you have one available you
              should be able to see the brushes and the leads to the field coils.
              These motors will run on AC or DC and turn at high rpm. I have not
              destructivly tested one yet. Most of the better ones have ball
              bearings at both ends. The method of conversion is to disconnect
              the feild windings from the motor circuit leaving as much wire
              length as possible. Connect a volt meter to the brush connections
              and a low voltage power supply (5 volts will do) to one of the field
              coils and spin the motor in the normal direction of rotation with a
              small cordless drill or other means. Observe the polarity of the
              voltage at the brushes and mark the brush leads accordingly as well
              as marking the field leads with the polarity of the applied low
              voltage. Repeat the process with the low voltage applied to the
              other field coil to determine which polarity gives you the same
              output polarity at the brushes and mark that field winding as well.
              At this point you have a choice of putting the field windings in
              series or parallel. Series (negative of one field connected to the
              positive of the other) will let you use higher excitation voltage
              with less current, and parallel (negitive leads connected together
              and positive leads connected together) will let you use lower
              excitation voltage with higher current. These motors are designed to
              run on 120 V or 240 V 60 Hz. Applying DC to the feilds at those
              voltages may cause them to heat up so a little experimentation may
              be needed with a specific motor. The motor (now a generator) need
              not be turning to check for field heating. A hefty variable DC
              supply comes in handy.
              In operation, a battery of appropriate voltage is connected to the
              brushes with a power diode in series to keep the battery from
              feeding back into the generator when not charging. A voltage
              regulator circuit will be needed to supply power to the field coils
              so that the output voltage is as desired.

              Hope this helps. I did this once back in the 60's just using an old
              regulator (relay type) from a car to charge 12 V car batteries. Not
              a real high rate of charge compared to an alternator, but did the
              job.

              vger :)
            • Shadow of the Redwood
              I was looking forward to this response. Thank you for sharing. ... Reese, Sorry I did not answer, lots of stuff taking up time, laptop motherboard failure,
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 26, 2005
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                I was looking forward to this response. Thank you for sharing.
                 


                vger62003 <stevefts@...> wrote:
                --- In TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com, Reese <reeza@f...> wrote:
                > >I'm very curious about modifying an electrical motor that way, can
                > >you provide details and/or pictures?
                >
                > I take it, the answer is no? You cannot (or will not) elaborate?
                >
                > Reese

                Reese,
                  Sorry I did not answer, lots of stuff taking up time, laptop
                motherboard failure, vacation, work etc...

                  About the vacuum cleaner motor mod, if you have one available you
                should be able to see the brushes and the leads to the field coils.
                These motors will run on AC or DC and turn at high rpm.  I have not
                destructivly tested one yet.  Most of the better ones have ball
                bearings at both ends.  The method of conversion is to disconnect
                the feild windings from the motor circuit leaving as much wire
                length as possible.  Connect a volt meter to the brush connections
                and a low voltage power supply (5 volts will do) to one of the field
                coils and spin the motor in the normal direction of rotation with a
                small cordless drill or other means.  Observe the polarity of the
                voltage at the brushes and mark the brush leads accordingly as well
                as marking the field leads with the polarity of the applied low
                voltage.  Repeat the process with the low voltage applied to the
                other field coil to determine which polarity gives you the same
                output polarity at the brushes and mark that field winding as well. 
                At this point you have a choice of putting the field windings in
                series or parallel.  Series (negative of one field connected to the
                positive of the other) will let you use higher excitation voltage
                with less current, and parallel (negitive leads connected together
                and positive leads connected together) will let you use lower
                excitation voltage with higher current. These motors are designed to
                run on 120 V or 240 V 60 Hz.  Applying DC to the feilds at those
                voltages may cause them to heat up so a little experimentation may
                be needed with a specific motor.  The motor (now a generator) need
                not be turning to check for field heating. A hefty variable DC
                supply comes in handy.
                  In operation, a battery of appropriate voltage is connected to the
                brushes with a power diode in series to keep the battery from
                feeding back into the generator when not charging.  A voltage
                regulator circuit will be needed to supply power to the field coils
                so that the output voltage is as desired.

                Hope this helps.  I did this once back in the 60's just using an old
                regulator (relay type) from a car to charge 12 V car batteries.  Not
                a real high rate of charge compared to an alternator, but did the
                job.

                vger :)




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              • Reese
                Ditto. Thank you, vger. Reese
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 26, 2005
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                  Ditto. Thank you, vger.

                  Reese

                  At 22:44 26-09-05 -0700, Shadow of the Redwood wrote:
                  >I was looking forward to this response. Thank you for sharing.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >vger62003 <stevefts@...> wrote:
                  >--- In TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com, Reese <reeza@f...> wrote:
                  >> >I'm very curious about modifying an electrical motor that way, can
                  >> >you provide details and/or pictures?
                  >>
                  >> I take it, the answer is no? You cannot (or will not) elaborate?
                  >>
                  >> Reese
                  >
                  >Reese,
                  > Sorry I did not answer, lots of stuff taking up time, laptop
                  >motherboard failure, vacation, work etc...
                  >
                  > About the vacuum cleaner motor mod, if you have one available you
                  >should be able to see the brushes and the leads to the field coils.
                  >These motors will run on AC or DC and turn at high rpm. I have not
                  >destructivly tested one yet. Most of the better ones have ball
                  >bearings at both ends. The method of conversion is to disconnect
                  >the feild windings from the motor circuit leaving as much wire
                  >length as possible. Connect a volt meter to the brush connections
                  >and a low voltage power supply (5 volts will do) to one of the field
                  >coils and spin the motor in the normal direction of rotation with a
                  >small cordless drill or other means. Observe the polarity of the
                  >voltage at the brushes and mark the brush leads accordingly as well
                  >as marking the field leads with the polarity of the applied low
                  >voltage. Repeat the process with the low voltage applied to the
                  >other field coil to determine which polarity gives you the same
                  >output polarity at the brushes and mark that field winding as well.
                  >At this point you have a choice of putting the field windings in
                  >series or parallel. Series (negative of one field connected to the
                  >positive of the other) will let you use higher excitation voltage
                  >with less current, and parallel (negitive leads connected together
                  >and positive leads connected together) will let you use lower
                  >excitation voltage with higher current. These motors are designed to
                  >run on 120 V or 240 V 60 Hz. Applying DC to the feilds at those
                  >voltages may cause them to heat up so a little experimentation may
                  >be needed with a specific motor. The motor (now a generator) need
                  >not be turning to check for field heating. A hefty variable DC
                  >supply comes in handy.
                  > In operation, a battery of appropriate voltage is connected to the
                  >brushes with a power diode in series to keep the battery from
                  >feeding back into the generator when not charging. A voltage
                  >regulator circuit will be needed to supply power to the field coils
                  >so that the output voltage is as desired.
                  >
                  >Hope this helps. I did this once back in the 60's just using an old
                  >regulator (relay type) from a car to charge 12 V car batteries. Not
                  >a real high rate of charge compared to an alternator, but did the
                  >job.
                  >
                  >vger :)
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