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RE: [TeslaTurbine] Looking for data

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  • McGalliard, Frederick B
    ... RPMs. ... the bar! :( Actually, the disk doesn t need much strength since it is just rotating under a strong breeze, more or less. In fact, for this kind
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 13, 2005
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      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Fred Sorenson [mailto:sea2fresh@...]
      ...
      > It sounds like the disks would have to be wider than the gaps
      > between them to have enough structural strength to withstand high
      RPMs.
      ...
      > A Tesla turbine for air sounds more like a spinning bar of
      > whatever the disk material is- weakened by "paper thin" slots cut into
      the bar! :(

      Actually, the disk doesn't need much strength since it is just rotating
      under a strong breeze, more or less. In fact, for this kind of air
      compressor, you could construct the entire disk array from plastic
      hardened sheets of paper or the like (similar to fiber glass). Remember
      that the air heating only takes place as the air is compressed in the
      exit nozzle, so you don't have to withstand a lot of heat. The
      mechanical force is torque on the center shaft and a modest centripetal
      load on the disk. Your vision should be more like a spinning column of
      air strengthened by the addition of slender disks of some stiff
      material. Less than 50% material should work well.
    • Reese
      ... Are there any decent graphical representations of this? Or must the reader/builder take a best guess on what this would look like? Don t say look at the
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 15, 2005
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        At 14:27 12-07-05 -0700, McGalliard, Frederick B wrote:

        >I don't mean to make it sound complex, but if you don't know how this
        >works, you could build a simple turbine, and get a shockingly low gas
        >flow, a really poor pressure, and really bad performance...

        >To envision this structure, we start with a nice wide opening in the
        >center. The gas spirals out in a narrowing spiral finally pushing out of
        >the disk pack and against the outside housing.

        Are there any decent graphical representations of this? Or must
        the reader/builder take a best guess on what this would look like?
        Don't say "look at the patents", you've already said more than
        they show.

        Reese
      • McGalliard, Frederick B
        I studied general physics, not aerodynamics and gas flow, so I don t have any personal references to this stuff. Some of the tesla turbine folk have come
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 18, 2005
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          I studied general physics, not aerodynamics and gas flow, so I don't
          have any personal references to this stuff. Some of the tesla turbine
          folk have come across some equations relating the plate spacing to the
          gas conditions, so I know this info exists, but I don't have any of it.
          The rest is a detail of the flow dynamics of the turbine and nozzle.
          There have been a few studies on it, and I thought there was actually a
          book or thick pamphlet, published on the design, but my impression is
          that there is no cookie cutter design rules set that will make it
          simple. And no, I wasn't impressed with the patents as a system design
          source either. I do plan eventually to build a TT, but I am not the most
          astute in a machine shop, so this may wait till I retire or get a lot of
          free time.

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Reese [mailto:reeza@...]
          > Sent: Friday, July 15, 2005 3:48 PM
          > To: TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com; TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: RE: [TeslaTurbine] Looking for data
          >
          >
          > At 14:27 12-07-05 -0700, McGalliard, Frederick B wrote:
          >
          > >I don't mean to make it sound complex, but if you don't know
          > how this
          > >works, you could build a simple turbine, and get a
          > shockingly low gas
          > >flow, a really poor pressure, and really bad performance...
          >
          > >To envision this structure, we start with a nice wide opening in the
          > >center. The gas spirals out in a narrowing spiral finally
          > pushing out
          > >of the disk pack and against the outside housing.
          >
          > Are there any decent graphical representations of this? Or
          > must the reader/builder take a best guess on what this would
          > look like? Don't say "look at the patents", you've already
          > said more than
          > they show.
          >
          > Reese
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Reese
          ... Okay. Someone mentioned a Tesla Turbine Builders Association? Are any members of that group on this list? Reese
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 18, 2005
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            At 07:36 18-07-05 -0700, McGalliard, Frederick B wrote:
            >I studied general physics, not aerodynamics and gas flow, so I don't
            >have any personal references to this stuff. Some of the tesla turbine
            >folk have come across some equations relating the plate spacing to the
            >gas conditions, so I know this info exists, but I don't have any of it.
            >The rest is a detail of the flow dynamics of the turbine and nozzle.
            >There have been a few studies on it, and I thought there was actually a
            >book or thick pamphlet, published on the design, but my impression is
            >that there is no cookie cutter design rules set that will make it
            >simple. And no, I wasn't impressed with the patents as a system design
            >source either. I do plan eventually to build a TT, but I am not the most
            >astute in a machine shop, so this may wait till I retire or get a lot of
            >free time.

            Okay. Someone mentioned a Tesla Turbine Builders Association? Are
            any members of that group on this list?

            Reese
          • Jim Dooley
            Reese, I am a member of the Tesla Engine Builders Association (TEBA). I have not heard or seen anything from the association in quite some time, though. There
            Message 5 of 12 , Jul 18, 2005
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              Reese,

               

              I am a member of the Tesla Engine Builders Association (TEBA).  I have not heard or seen anything from the association in quite some time, though.  There is also another group of turbine builders called the Phoenix Engine Builders.  You might check them out also.

               

              Jim Dooley

               


              From: TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Reese
              Sent: Monday, July 18, 2005 9:51 AM
              To: TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com; TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [TeslaTurbine] Looking for data

               

              At 07:36 18-07-05 -0700, McGalliard, Frederick B wrote:
              >I studied general physics, not aerodynamics and gas flow, so I don't
              >have any personal references to this stuff. Some of the tesla turbine
              >folk have come across some equations relating the plate spacing to the
              >gas conditions, so I know this info exists, but I don't have any of it.
              >The rest is a detail of the flow dynamics of the turbine and nozzle.
              >There have been a few studies on it, and I thought there was actually a
              >book or thick pamphlet, published on the design, but my impression is
              >that there is no cookie cutter design rules set that will make it
              >simple. And no, I wasn't impressed with the patents as a system design
              >source either. I do plan eventually to build a TT, but I am not the most
              >astute in a machine shop, so this may wait till I retire or get a lot of
              >free time.

              Okay. Someone mentioned a Tesla Turbine Builders Association? Are
              any members of that group on this list?

              Reese


            • Reese
              ... Okay. ... Okay. Thanks for the info. Reese
              Message 6 of 12 , Jul 18, 2005
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                At 10:29 18-07-05 -0500, Jim Dooley wrote:

                >Reese,
                >
                >
                >
                >I am a member of the Tesla Engine Builders Association (TEBA). I have not heard or seen anything from the association in quite some time, though.

                Okay.

                >There is also another group of turbine builders called the Phoenix Engine Builders. You might check them out also.

                Okay. Thanks for the info.

                Reese
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