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Re: [TheTeslaTurbineList] permanent magnet bearings

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  • Bernard Clay
    ... Richard F. Post currently does R&D work at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Did a search at the lab s website (www.llnl.gov). R F Post s phone no. is
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 1, 1999
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      >From: "Sam Garza" <sgarza@...>
      >Reply-To: TheTeslaTurbineList@onelist.com
      >To: <TheTeslaTurbineList@onelist.com>
      >Subject: Re: [TheTeslaTurbineList] permanent magnet bearings
      >Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 09:12:16 -0500
      >
      >Bernard,
      >How do I get in contact with R. F. Post I would like to pursue this to see
      >how it compares with Tesla's Dynamo.
      >Sam Garza

      Richard F. Post currently does R&D work at Lawrence Livermore National Lab.
      Did a search at the lab's website (www.llnl.gov). R F Post's phone no. is
      listed as 925-422-9853; his fax is 925-423-7914. Email address:
      post3@...

      Try the LLNL library which has documents online. On the search form on the
      'author' field enter 'Post R*' There are docs there on his work
      on the Inductrack, passive permanent magnet bearings, the Halbach array
      motor/generator, and his flywheel energy storage module or electromechanical
      battery as he prefers to call it. These are all in Adobe Acrobat PDF
      format, by the way.

      Happy hunting.


      BC
    • Paul Eitson
      Bernard Clay, Thanks for the posts of the diagrams .I am certainly more well informed. Time has not permitted my discussion of this subject. My son s flywheel
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 2, 1999
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        Bernard Clay,
        Thanks for the posts of the diagrams .I am certainly more well
        informed. Time has not permitted my discussion of this subject. My son's
        flywheel disk generator design may benefit as a result. He is debating
        between a stationary or a rotating armature. I have given him copies of
        the diagrams to possibly include the arrays in his plans. Plans for the
        generator have not been formalized so suggestions would be welcome.

        Paul

        Sam Garza,
        Hope to hear how the dynamo comparison works out.

        Bernard Clay wrote:
        >
        > From: "Bernard Clay" <bernclay@...>
        >
        > >From: "Sam Garza" <sgarza@...>
        > >Reply-To: TheTeslaTurbineList@onelist.com
        > >To: <TheTeslaTurbineList@onelist.com>
        > >Subject: Re: [TheTeslaTurbineList] permanent magnet bearings
        > >Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 09:12:16 -0500
        > >
        > >Bernard,
        > >How do I get in contact with R. F. Post I would like to pursue this to see
        > >how it compares with Tesla's Dynamo.
        > >Sam Garza
        >
        > Richard F. Post currently does R&D work at Lawrence Livermore National Lab.
        > Did a search at the lab's website (www.llnl.gov). R F Post's phone no. is
        > listed as 925-422-9853; his fax is 925-423-7914. Email address:
        > post3@...
        >
        > Try the LLNL library which has documents online. On the search form on the
        > 'author' field enter 'Post R*' There are docs there on his work
        > on the Inductrack, passive permanent magnet bearings, the Halbach array
        > motor/generator, and his flywheel energy storage module or electromechanical
        > battery as he prefers to call it. These are all in Adobe Acrobat PDF
        > format, by the way.
        >
        > Happy hunting.
        >
        > BC
        >
        > > part of the "TheTeslaTurbineList"...from
        > the :"Tesla Technolgy, Today!" group
      • Bernard Clay
        ... How does a Halbach machine compare with Tesla s dynamo? I m not sure the question s fair. It s like matching apples and oranges. Tesla s dynamo is
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 5, 1999
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          >From: Paul Eitson <xyme2@...>
          >Subject: Re: [TheTeslaTurbineList] permanent magnet bearings
          >Date: Thu, 02 Dec 1999 17:41:02 -0600
          >

          >Sam Garza,
          > Hope to hear how the dynamo comparison works out.
          >
          >Bernard Clay wrote:
          > >
          > > From: "Bernard Clay" <bernclay@...>
          > >
          > > >From: "Sam Garza" <sgarza@...>
          > > >Subject: Re: [TheTeslaTurbineList] permanent magnet bearings
          > > >Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 09:12:16 -0500
          > > >
          > > >Bernard,
          > > >How do I get in contact with R. F. Post I would like to pursue this to
          >see
          > > >how it compares with Tesla's Dynamo.
          > > >Sam Garza
          > >


          How does a Halbach machine compare with Tesla's dynamo?
          I'm not sure the question's fair. It's like matching apples and oranges.
          Tesla's dynamo is basically a high-current. low-voltage producer. Since
          Post uses litz wire for his preferred design, his Halbach array generators
          would be be high-voltage, low-current producers.

          The better question is if we replace the conventional magnets in a disk
          dynamo with Post's Halbach arrays, what sort of output would be realized?
          Would the power be significantly greater? Would voltage be higher? How
          about amperage? Someone could ask Post this. If not Post, then Merritt or
          his other co-inventors at LLNL.

          The Tesla disk dynamo descended from Faraday's. Now, how much power a
          Faraday disk puts out depends on just two things: strength of the
          intercepted magnetic field and the relative speed of disc rotor to the
          external circuit (the slip rings, the brushes) 'stator.' Neither speed or
          direction of the magnets seems to play any role on output. So there's not
          much point in spinning the magnets. In a practical machine, it's the
          conducting disk that's always spun. A problem of the Faraday disk was
          maintaining constant electrical contact between the collecting brushes and
          the disk given its high speed rotation. It was this problem that Tesla
          sought to resolve. And the clever arrangement we see in his disk dynamo was
          the result. The use of two copper disks allowed for higher voltages and use
          of opposite directions of magnetism for each disk allowed both terminals to
          be fixed to the shafts of both disks, bypassing the charge collection
          difficulty from the disk rims.

          Suppose we build a disk dynamo designed around a planar Halbach array (see
          planar_halbach.jpg). It will resemble a Faraday-type machine in looks only
          but will not be hobbled by its limitations. You can spin either the magnet
          array or the disk and still produce current on the disk. This choice wasn't
          possible with Faraday. In fact, in their litz-wire conductor Halbach
          electric generator, Merritt and Post preferred to spin the array and let
          the conductor be the stator, thus simplifying the extraction of power
          output. So, similarly, a Halbach array disk dynamo can avoid spinning the
          disk altogether and have the magnet array act as rotor instead. You can
          have a series of planar Halbach array rotors interleaved with stator copper
          disks strung on the same shaft to boost voltage.

          Neither Post or Merritt report exploring this configuration for use
          expressly as a power generator. They do suggest a similar design for use as
          passive bearings. We can only guess what other advantages such a dynamo
          would have.


          BC
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