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RE: [TeslaTurbine] Re: Tiny Turbine

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  • Welsh James E Contr 21SOPS/MCOM
    Hmmm hadn t thought of that. I was considering salvaged hard disks... any thoughts... ... From: William Carr [mailto:Jkirk3279@beanstalk.net] Sent: Tuesday,
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 24, 2005
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      Hmmm hadn't thought of that.

      I was considering salvaged hard disks... any thoughts...

      -----Original Message-----
      From: William Carr [mailto:Jkirk3279@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, March 22, 2005 9:02 PM
      To: TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [TeslaTurbine] Re: Tiny Turbine



      On Mar 22, 2005, at 3:35 PM, TeslaTurbine@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      > To All
      > I added some photo's of my 2.5" turbine. If anyone cares to look
      > there in the tiny turbine album.
      > Here's what I've learned. First these little motors suck alot of
      > air. I have a six gallon tank, and I only got about 30 seconds of run
      > time before it was spent. Next disc spacing is extremly extremly
      > important. Due to convienience I built this turbine with .015 to .02
      > clearance, but I think about .005 would be optimal. Well thats about
      > it. Hollar at me if you want to know anymore


      Let's flesh out the details. You're using a six gallon air tank to
      get motive power out of a small turbine.

      Your disk spacing is 0.015 inches.

      According to the old article interviewing Tesla himself, the clearance
      for air should be closer to 0.01inches. The clearance for water is a
      bit more.

      I looked at the pictures you posted.

      I don't see any air slots near the hub.

      A TT used for motive power needs air to enter via a nozzle in the side
      of the case and exit from a vent near the hub. And each disk needs
      slots in it to allow air near the hub to flow between the disks.

      A TT used to BLOW air needs air to enter through the vent at the hub,
      pass through the slots in the disks, and exit via the valve in the side
      of the case.

      Imagine what would happen if you used five disks, with no hub slots.

      The disks spin, the air or working fluid is drawn along with the
      spinning disks and thrown outward via centrifigal force.

      Now, this causes a vacuum to develop at the center hub. If there are
      no slots in the disks, then there'd be no way for more air to enter the
      system. The air flow stops. Efficiency of the system falls.

      But if there ARE slots in the disks, outside air can be sucked through
      those hub slots and thus blown outward. A vacuum still develops of
      course. It draws a constant airflow through those hub slots. The
      system is thus more efficient.

      Of course, if you make a TT with only one disk, you don't need slots.



      My own TT project is still on the drawing board, but the pilot project
      will be made from AOL CD's. They're flat, designed to spin without
      wobbling, and free.

      The second project, designed to be heat resistant, may be made from 3"
      cutoff wheels with 3/8 inch center holes.

      The idea of the cutoff wheels is that they're extremely fire resistant,
      designed to run at very high speeds without wobbling, and hey, they're
      cheap. Machined brass disks flat enough might be salty.






      The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain
      the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the
      government - lest it come to dominate our lives and interests.
      --Patrick Henry





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    • Reese
      I was also considering salvaged platters from disk drives, the 5.25 variety actually. Except I was going to drive them with a high speed motor and A) get
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 24, 2005
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        I was also considering salvaged platters from disk drives,
        the 5.25" variety actually.

        Except I was going to drive them with a high speed motor
        and A) get compressed air for an air brush, or B) use it
        as a vacuum pump, depending on airline arrangements.

        I'm still in the parts-gathering stage, I have sufficient
        platters for a start but I'll want more.

        I figured one of the $10 trim routers from eBay would run
        things at 30,000 RPM for short term, then the motor would
        burn out. If the 5K rated disks didn't explode first.

        Obviously, a sturdy enclosure with a good scattershield
        is called for. Or maybe instead, use a washing machine
        motor and gear things up less dramatically with a series
        of pulleys.

        Any thoughts on the design?

        I would love to hear thoughts and where possible, specs
        on extant turbines this size.

        Reese
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