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focusing on IA and Taxomony after years as a ________

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  • Robert Dornbush
    Hi, and welcome to the group! I too am a convert to Metadata Mgmt. and Taxonomy (LIS related) studies after years as a graphic designer.  I made the switch to
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 17, 2013
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      Hi, and welcome to the group!

      I too am a convert to Metadata Mgmt. and Taxonomy (LIS related) studies after years as a graphic designer.  I made the switch to Information Architecture some 14 years ago after being inspired by a trip to my local public library (then in downtown SF) left me wanting to save the world by blazing a path to findability & ease of use.

      I have been working with Techie LIS majors (Cyber-Librarians) for a number of years now and have found that while we have much in common, it is really our differences that make us a powerful team when it comes to assisting customers with enterprise site structure and search engine enhancements.  These are development concerns where requirements gathering (research & analysis) to document needs for improvement from an end User's perspective is totally critical - so my being able to bring some User Experience expertise to the table makes it a win-win for me, my colleagues, and our clients.

      Good luck, and please continue to post and ask questions on or speak out about information design issues here. Taxonomy may be a $10 word where most who are unfamiliar with it cannot afford or understand anything greater than a 50 cent point of view, but in the end it is really simply about designing, creating, & implementing an improved web experience for our clients and their customers...

      not so different from the Graphic Design work you were doing before, if you take my meaning.
    • dfanslow
      Hi Robert, Thank you for the warm welcome! You are right, designing is first and foremost about your audience - in library land, your users/patrons. Through my
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 18, 2013
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        Hi Robert,

        Thank you for the warm welcome!

        You are right, designing is first and foremost about your audience - in library land, your users/patrons. Through my research, it seems that a lot of information architects come from both the graphic design field and library science. It does seem like a good blend of both skills!

        IA and UX is so important. As a school librarian, I saw students and teachers struggle every day with academic databases due to poor interfaces and the inability to easily visualize the scope of a database's content. Nevermind learning how to search and having the patience for faceted search!

        I am starting the Vocabulary Design course at SJSU next month, and I am excited to learn more about organizing information behind the scenes! I will definitely be asking questions when the time comes...this seems like a wonderful group of knowledgeable professionals.

        Cheers,
        Debbie

        --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com, Robert Dornbush <designed4use@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi, and welcome to the group!
        >
        > I too am a convert to Metadata Mgmt. and Taxonomy (LIS related) studies after years as a graphic designer. �I made the switch to Information Architecture some 14 years ago after being inspired by a trip to my local public library (then in downtown SF) left me wanting to save the world by blazing a path to findability & ease of use.
        >
        > I have been working with Techie LIS majors (Cyber-Librarians) for a number of years now and have found that while we have much in common, it is really our differences that make us a powerful team when it comes to assisting customers with enterprise site structure and search engine enhancements. �These are development concerns where requirements gathering (research & analysis) to document needs for improvement from an end User's perspective is totally critical - so my being able to bring some User Experience expertise to the table makes it a win-win for me, my colleagues, and our clients.
        >
        > Good luck, and please continue to post and ask questions on or speak out about information design issues here. Taxonomy may be a $10 word where most who are unfamiliar with it cannot afford or understand anything greater than a 50 cent point of view, but in the end it is really simply about designing, creating, & implementing an improved web experience for our clients and their customers...
        >
        > not so different from the Graphic Design work you were doing before, if you take my meaning.
        >
      • Robert Dornbush
        There is an amazing amount to learn about the intersection of metadata management and technology (indexing, doc repository organization, SEO and findability,
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 22, 2013
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          There is an amazing amount to learn about the intersection of metadata management and technology (indexing, doc repository organization, SEO and findability, Search Driven Applications, taxonomy management systems, content mgmt. systems, etc.  I know that your observations about usability (or the lack thereof in such systems) are so important.
           
          That is the place where Experience Design is becoming the common denominator for all of the studies we know and love - and everyone in  an enterprise from C-level execs on down to IT and BA (tactical operations folks) need to be concerned and care about developing products that are easy and compelling to use

          From: dfanslow <deborah.fanslow@...>
          To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2013 11:07 PM
          Subject: [TaxoCoP] Re: focusing on IA and Taxomony after years as a ________
           
          Hi Robert,

          Thank you for the warm welcome!

          You are right, designing is first and foremost about your audience - in library land, your users/patrons. Through my research, it seems that a lot of information architects come from both the graphic design field and library science. It does seem like a good blend of both skills!

          IA and UX is so important. As a school librarian, I saw students and teachers struggle every day with academic databases due to poor interfaces and the inability to easily visualize the scope of a database's content. Nevermind learning how to search and having the patience for faceted search!

          I am starting the Vocabulary Design course at SJSU next month, and I am excited to learn more about organizing information behind the scenes! I will definitely be asking questions when the time comes...this seems like a wonderful group of knowledgeable professionals.

          Cheers,
          Debbie

          --- In mailto:TaxoCoP%40yahoogroups.com, Robert Dornbush <designed4use@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi, and welcome to the group!
          >
          > I too am a convert to Metadata Mgmt. and Taxonomy (LIS related) studies after years as a graphic designer. �I made the switch to Information Architecture some 14 years ago after being inspired by a trip to my local public library (then in downtown SF) left me wanting to save the world by blazing a path to findability & ease of use.
          >
          > I have been working with Techie LIS majors (Cyber-Librarians) for a number of years now and have found that while we have much in common, it is really our differences that make us a powerful team when it comes to assisting customers with enterprise site structure and search engine enhancements. �These are development concerns where requirements gathering (research & analysis) to document needs for improvement from an end User's perspective is totally critical - so my being able to bring some User Experience expertise to the table makes it a win-win for me, my colleagues, and our clients.
          >
          > Good luck, and please continue to post and ask questions on or speak out about information design issues here. Taxonomy may be a $10 word where most who are unfamiliar with it cannot afford or understand anything greater than a 50 cent point of view, but in the end it is really simply about designing, creating, & implementing an improved web experience for our clients and their customers...
          >
          > not so different from the Graphic Design work you were doing before, if you take my meaning.
          >

        • Frank Guerino
          Hello All, I m looking for good examples of Visual Data Maps that those of you in the community might find useful for dealing with Taxonomies, Ontologies, and
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 30, 2013
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            Hello All,

            I'm looking for good examples of Visual Data Maps that those of you in the community might find useful for dealing with Taxonomies, Ontologies, and Libraries.

            Some Background: As part of my work with the IF4IT, I'm currently involved in the design and implementation of a tool that takes Data/Information and uses it to rapidly auto-generate highly organized and feature rich web sites that consist of millions of pages of web content.  These auto-generated web sites are essentially used as enterprise-wide Electronic Libraries for curated content.  As part of its output, the tool also auto-generates constructs like Catalogs, Indexes, Semantic Relationships between things and different Interactive Views of Data. For example:
            1. Text-Only Tabular View of Data Relationships
            2. Visual Interactive Node Cluster View
            I'm now interested in expanding the inventory of interactive data visualizations, such as in the case of the latter example, with the intent to facilitate Visual Data Maps.

            I'm reaching out to the community in hopes that you might be able to point me to various Data Map Visualizations which you find useful for your work, especially in the cases of dealing with things like Taxonomies, Ontologies, and Libraries.  If you know of any, could you please point me to them?  NOTE: Your examples don't need to be "interactive," as we'll work to make them interactive, ourselves.

            Any assistance is greatly appreciated.

            My Best,

            Frank
            --
            Frank Guerino, Chairman
            The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
            http://www.if4it.com
            1.908.294.5191 (M)


          • Frank Guerino
            Hello All, (I apologize for cross-posting but I wanted to open this up to multiple KM, LM & Taxonomy communities.) I m reaching out to the community in hopes
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 8 7:43 AM
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              Hello All,

              (I apologize for cross-posting but I wanted to open this up to multiple KM, LM & Taxonomy communities.)

              I'm reaching out to the community in hopes of getting your advice about what you consider to be useful Data Visualizations for KM, LM, and Taxonomy work.  (Note: By "useful," I mean those visualizations that you actually use as part of your daily work or feel would truly be meaningful for your stakeholders, if you had them.)

              Some Background: As part of my work with the IF4IT, I've been involved in a two year effort to design and implement a new type of KM tool (NOUNZ®) that automatically generates highly organized and feature rich Electronic Libraries.  The tool is a compiler and it essentially takes data as its input and generates powerful Web Sites as its output.  Initial tests show that millions of feature rich, highly organized, heavily interlinked, and high quality Web Pages can be generated in an hour or two, as compared to many years if done manually by an army of people.  The purpose is that such an approach makes it very easy to publish large volumes of Data & information to large communities, via the web.

              It took awhile to build the engine and we've now progressed to building rich, user-friendly, and interactive Data Visualizations (or Knowledge Views).  Examples include (Note: You must have IE 9 or greater to view any interactive visualizations):
              1. Catalogs & Indexes (Moderately Complex)
              2. Aggregated Views of Data (Least Complex)
              3. Text-only singular entity Data Views (Least Complex)
              4. Text-only Tabular/Semantic Relationship Views (Least Complex)
              5. Interactive Dashboard Views (Moderately Complex)
              6. Interactive Node Cluster Views (Most Complex)
              Given the current state of maturity, the interest is to progress to many more of Complex Data Views (such as #6).  Therefore, I'm reaching out to the community in hopes of getting your views on the topic.  May I please impose on you to kindly provide what you believe to be "usefulData Visualization for KM & LM, along with your professional opinions and advice as to what value they add and why?

              Any assistance is greatly appreciated.

              My Best,

              Frank
              -- 
              Frank Guerino, Chairman
              The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
              http://www.if4it.com
              1.908.294.5191 (M)
            • Fran Alexander
              Dear Taxonomists I hope this call for papers will be of interest to some of you, and please forward this message to others. I am a guest co-editor for a
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 12 10:24 AM
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                Dear Taxonomists

                I hope this call for papers will be of interest to some of you, and please forward this message to others.

                I am a guest co-editor for a special issue on Semantic Search for Aslib Proceedings/Journal of Information Management, to be published next year.  This is an academic peer-reviewed journal, but we are keen to include practitioner- and end user-focused research, and case studies. If you are not used to writing for journals, I can advise on academic styling, structure, and referencing.

                More details about the call for papers and the journal are here: http://www.vocabcontrol.com/?p=293

                Many thanks

                Fran
              • Frank Guerino
                Good Day, The Foundation recently released its Taxonomy of Policy Types (a.k.a.
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 23 11:45 AM
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                  Good Day,

                  The Foundation recently released its Taxonomy of Policy Types (a.k.a. Policy Taxonomy), which provides a linear inventory of many of the key policies types .

                  Such taxonomies are often used as part of broader Records Management.  For example, they may be used to facilitate managing inventories of the types of policies maintained by an enterprise or in the categorizing of stored policies, in Electronic or Paper Libraries.

                  This Taxonomy of Policy Types is reconciled with and lexicographically aligned to the Taxonomy of Record Types, as well as with all other taxonomies.  All Taxonomy elements or entries link back to their specific parent Discipline area and to their Glossary entry.

                  Other taxonomies that may be useful to you and your enterprise can be found at the IF4IT Taxonomy Inventory page.

                  I hope you find the material useful.

                  My Best,

                  Frank
                  -- 
                  Frank Guerino, Chairman
                  The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
                  http://www.if4it.com
                  1.908.294.5191 (M)
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