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Re: [TaxoCoP] Taxonomy Strategy

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  • Patrick Lambe
    Examine your search logs. Study your users. Build typical information task scenarios for different user types, so you understand the typical search needs. P
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 8, 2012
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      Examine your search logs. Study your users. Build typical information task scenarios for different user types, so you understand the typical search needs.

      P

      Patrick Lambe
      Partner
      Tel: +65 62210383





      On Feb 9, 2012, at 8:50 AM, antonio marraffa wrote:

       

      Hi Matt,

      so 800 metadata items,
      prodcuts (about 200)
      material (about 100)
      the rest are products and material features,
      and also process metadata, most related to document process, author, Business unit, etc.,

      I do not have any example, we are just discussing how to manage these metadata for the search. The point a taxonomy for search should be not so big otherwise it is very diffucult to get a good search refners usability. Too much refiners are not useful,

      My point is to get information about methods which allow to select the most important metadata and to built a light taxonomy in order to be useful also as search refiners.

      Thanks in advance
      antonio

      Am 09.02.2012 00:16, schrieb Matt Moore:

       
      Antonio,
       
      When you say 800 items - what you mean? What makes up the 800? Can you give examples? Do they all refer to the same thing (e.g. products) or do they fall into groups (e.g. products, customers, processes)?
       
      800 terms is not a lot (800 fields however...) and you could probably do that using SharePoint 2010 functionality. More info would be helpful.
       
      Cheers,
       
      Matt

      From: antonio marraffa <antonio_marraffa@...>
      To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
      Sent: Thursday, 9 February 2012 9:28 AM
      Subject: Re: [TaxoCoP] Taxonomy Strategy

       
      Hi all,

      I have a very simple question:
      our customer needs a taxonomy that should be implemented on SharePoint 2010 and also be searchable via FAST for SharePoint.

      The big problem is to harmonize the metadata 800 items, organize in a very simple and useful taxonomy which should appear not also as navigation tree but also as refiners.

      If someone of you have experience in how to handle such a big amount of metadata, reducing them in a considerable way, but on the other hand to safe the main structure.
      Thanks in advance,

      Antonio



      Am 08.02.2012 22:58, schrieb Matt Moore:
       
      Dave,
       
      That's a very valid question and a lot of it depends on the drivers behind the taxonomy project. Patrick Lambe has written about this in "Organising Knowledge",  Heather Hedden has some comments in "The Accidental Taxonomist", and I'm sure some of the Early Associates webcasts also discuss this.
       
      My own take is that you need to "think global, act local". As an employee or a consultant you need to deliver stuff and if you go off to boil the ocean, you may not find yourself with a job when you come back. At the same time, you don't want to design something that will come back to bite you in the backside in a year's time. So I'd want to tackle a project that can show results in an acceptable timeframe for stakeholders that also takes into account the broader organisational context while doing so. N.B. I'm not saying that's easy.
       
      As a hypothetical, let's say I worked for a large health & pharmaceuticals multinational. That organisation probably already has a mass of taxonomic structures (whether they are called that or not) so I'd want to have at least some idea of what was there already, what it covered and where it overlaps. But I probably wouldn't want to spend 18 months doing that. In mapping the existing structures, I'd probably want a roadmap of taxonomy projects (e.g. improve intranet navigation) that delivered something tangible every 2-3 months and with a business case next to each one.
       
      Just my take.
       
      Matt


      -- 


    • John O'Gorman
      Dave; Unlike my fellow taxonomists I recommend expanding on Matt s idea but in a different direction. You don t have to spend a lot of time to craft a high
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 9, 2012
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        Dave;
         
        Unlike my fellow taxonomists I recommend expanding on Matt's idea but in a different direction. You don't have to spend a lot of time to craft a high level taxonomy that will work for the whole enterprise. Send me an email and I will show you how it's done. Armed with that, you can then go to any size 'application' and apply the same rules. In fact, train up a bunch of your project teammates and you can do multiple targets at the same time. Since you will be starting with a globally thought out taxonomy in the first place, using the exact same approach and acting locally from the bottom up guarantees integration at the end.
         
        Best regards
         
        John O'
         
        PS. The primary responsibility of the people who say it can't be done is to get out of the way of the people who are doing it.
         
         
         
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: daiv.fleming [mailto:xshapes@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, February 8, 2012 12:31 PM
        To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [TaxoCoP] Taxonomy Strategy

         

        I am working on a new taxonomy initiative lately, and we have some people weighing in with different ideas about how to approach our global enterprise taxonomy work.

        Question:
        Should an enterprise begin developing their taxonomy by addressing the total scope, i.e. everything, or is it okay to take on a smaller part of the enterprise, such as an intranet? The rationale defending the smaller approach is that - we can do that well, and then continue from there, using that success as a proof of concept, and then leverage that success into expanded work.

        Thanks in advance to all of you who might be able to recommend a solution, or weigh in on this topic.

        Take care,
        Dave

      • antonio marraffa
          Hi john, I m also interested in how to build an entrprise taxonomy, of course if possible send me some interesting links. regards Antonio ... Hi john, I m
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 9, 2012
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          Hi john,

          I'm also interested in how to build an entrprise taxonomy, of course if possible send me some interesting links.

          regards
          Antonio

          Von: John O'Gorman <jogorman@...>
          An: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
          Gesendet: 15:18 Donnerstag, 9.Februar 2012
          Betreff: Re: [TaxoCoP] Taxonomy Strategy

           
          Dave;
           
          Unlike my fellow taxonomists I recommend expanding on Matt's idea but in a different direction. You don't have to spend a lot of time to craft a high level taxonomy that will work for the whole enterprise. Send me an email and I will show you how it's done. Armed with that, you can then go to any size 'application' and apply the same rules. In fact, train up a bunch of your project teammates and you can do multiple targets at the same time. Since you will be starting with a globally thought out taxonomy in the first place, using the exact same approach and acting locally from the bottom up guarantees integration at the end.
           
          Best regards
           
          John O'
           
          PS. The primary responsibility of the people who say it can't be done is to get out of the way of the people who are doing it.
           
           
           
           
          -----Original Message-----
          From: daiv.fleming [mailto:xshapes@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, February 8, 2012 12:31 PM
          To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [TaxoCoP] Taxonomy Strategy

           
          I am working on a new taxonomy initiative lately, and we have some people weighing in with different ideas about how to approach our global enterprise taxonomy work.

          Question:
          Should an enterprise begin developing their taxonomy by addressing the total scope, i.e. everything, or is it okay to take on a smaller part of the enterprise, such as an intranet? The rationale defending the smaller approach is that - we can do that well, and then continue from there, using that success as a proof of concept, and then leverage that success into expanded work.

          Thanks in advance to all of you who might be able to recommend a solution, or weigh in on this topic.

          Take care,
          Dave



        • carolrocks80
          Hi, I think people have covered what I call the ying and yang of these types of projects. Whichever way I go, I make sure I: 1) understand both the global
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 9, 2012
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            Hi, I think people have covered what I call the "ying and yang" of these types of projects. Whichever way I go, I make sure I:

            1) understand both the global and local contexts (I like the "act local, think global" remark)
            2) be clear on exactly which requirements are being met by the taxonomic effort and get the customer to prioritize those.
            3) point out, to the extent possible, what constraints may have impacted the design. For example, if the local requirement must predominate, you want to think through and document(using your knowledge in item 1 above)an possible impacts or limitations for global use you foresee from the design. For example, let's say you designed a taxonomy for an e-commerce site where the company is global but they wanted you to do the US piece first. Clear constraints there would be that the spelling, term names would represent US English but might not translate to other languages and that the entire structure could reflect the way in which English speakers conceptualize the world so if they wanted to reuse for a Japanese audience they would not necessarily have the right structure.

            Hope this helps.

            Carol Hert
            Consultant and Senior Taxonomist
            Gary Carlson Consulting

            With that information, the customer can be much better informed about your work and how to use it going forward.

            --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com, "daiv.fleming" <xshapes@...> wrote:
            >
            > I am working on a new taxonomy initiative lately, and we have some people weighing in with different ideas about how to approach our global enterprise taxonomy work.
            >
            > Question:
            > Should an enterprise begin developing their taxonomy by addressing the total scope, i.e. everything, or is it okay to take on a smaller part of the enterprise, such as an intranet? The rationale defending the smaller approach is that - we can do that well, and then continue from there, using that success as a proof of concept, and then leverage that success into expanded work.
            >
            > Thanks in advance to all of you who might be able to recommend a solution, or weigh in on this topic.
            >
            > Take care,
            > Dave
            >
          • Dave Fleming
            Thanks for your insights, Carol. Your global perspective is especially helpful, prompting me to rethink the portability and extensibility issues inherent in
            Message 5 of 14 , Feb 9, 2012
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              Thanks for your insights, Carol. Your global perspective is especially helpful, prompting me to rethink the portability and extensibility issues inherent in those types of language barriers. 

              Are there reputable Chinese Taxonomists or Europeans that anyone out there could recommend?

              Dave 

              On Thu, Feb 9, 2012 at 1:43 PM, carolrocks80 <rockcny1@...> wrote:
               

              Hi, I think people have covered what I call the "ying and yang" of these types of projects. Whichever way I go, I make sure I:

              1) understand both the global and local contexts (I like the "act local, think global" remark)
              2) be clear on exactly which requirements are being met by the taxonomic effort and get the customer to prioritize those.
              3) point out, to the extent possible, what constraints may have impacted the design. For example, if the local requirement must predominate, you want to think through and document(using your knowledge in item 1 above)an possible impacts or limitations for global use you foresee from the design. For example, let's say you designed a taxonomy for an e-commerce site where the company is global but they wanted you to do the US piece first. Clear constraints there would be that the spelling, term names would represent US English but might not translate to other languages and that the entire structure could reflect the way in which English speakers conceptualize the world so if they wanted to reuse for a Japanese audience they would not necessarily have the right structure.

              Hope this helps.

              Carol Hert
              Consultant and Senior Taxonomist
              Gary Carlson Consulting

              With that information, the customer can be much better informed about your work and how to use it going forward.



              --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com, "daiv.fleming" <xshapes@...> wrote:
              >
              > I am working on a new taxonomy initiative lately, and we have some people weighing in with different ideas about how to approach our global enterprise taxonomy work.
              >
              > Question:
              > Should an enterprise begin developing their taxonomy by addressing the total scope, i.e. everything, or is it okay to take on a smaller part of the enterprise, such as an intranet? The rationale defending the smaller approach is that - we can do that well, and then continue from there, using that success as a proof of concept, and then leverage that success into expanded work.
              >
              > Thanks in advance to all of you who might be able to recommend a solution, or weigh in on this topic.
              >
              > Take care,
              > Dave
              >




              --
              Best regards,
              Dave Fleming


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