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Adoption Rates of Non-Compulsory Tools

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  • michael.shulha
    Hi All, I have an interesting question for the community. I am working on a project that involves the implementation of a new DAM tool. While this tool has
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 10, 2009
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      Hi All,I have an interesting question for the community. I am working on a project that involves the implementation of a new DAM tool. While this tool has potential benefits for a very large part of the organization, it will still be possible for many employees to continue with their daily tasks without being forced to use it.I am wondering if people could share their experiences and any data (either quantitative, or anecdotal) around adoption rates of non-compulsory tools, (doesn't have to be DAM related). This could include any best practices you have come across that speed up adoption rates as well.Essentially we are trying to help set expectations for a client around the level of expected adoption of a non-compulsory tool as well as give them an idea of some common factors that could increase that adoption rate. Eventually we would specifically like to show how the integration of taxonomy is something that would speed up adoption so if anyone has specific data, or has been down this road before, and could share your experiences it would be much appreciated.ThanksMichael Shulha Taxonomy Consultant _____________________________ EARLEY & ASSOCIATES
    • Matt Moore
      Michael, I think the stuff by Everett Rogers & Geoffrey A Moore can be applied to this kind of situation (I m using it to underpin a Sharepoint rollout at the
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 10, 2009
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        Michael,

        I think the stuff by Everett Rogers & Geoffrey A Moore can be applied to this kind of situation (I'm using it to underpin a Sharepoint rollout at the moment).

        I would suggest that you segment the organisation you are working with into Innovators, Early Adopters, Early Majority, etc. Each has a different set of needs & each requires a different value proposition. "Crossing the Chasm" pretty much gives you a game plan for doing this.

        Integration is very important for the Early & Late Majority (esp. the latter) of adopters.

        Matt


        From: michael.shulha <michael@...>
        To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Fri, December 11, 2009 12:57:46 AM
        Subject: [TaxoCoP] Adoption Rates of Non-Compulsory Tools

         

        Hi All,

        I have an interesting question for the community. I am working on a project that involves the implementation of a new DAM tool. While this tool has potential benefits for a very large part of the organization, it will still be possible for many employees to continue with their daily tasks without being forced to use it.

        I am wondering if people could share their experiences and any data (either quantitative, or anecdotal) around adoption rates of non-compulsory tools, (doesn't have to be DAM related). This could include any best practices you have come across that speed up adoption rates as well.

        Essentially we are trying to help set expectations for a client around the level of expected adoption of a non-compulsory tool as well as give them an idea of some common factors that could increase that adoption rate. Eventually we would specifically like to show how the integration of taxonomy is something that would speed up adoption so if anyone has specific data, or has been down this road before, and could share your experiences it would be much appreciated.

        Thanks

        Michael Shulha
        Taxonomy Consultant
        ____________ _________ ________
        EARLEY & ASSOCIATES


      • margaret.ostrander@thomsonreuters.com
        Michael, Great question. We are 4 months post the rollout of a complete overhaul of our employee directory. One new feature is the ability for employees to tag
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 11, 2009
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          Michael,

          Great question. We are 4 months post the rollout of a complete overhaul of our employee directory. One new feature is the ability for employees to tag themselves with their skills, interests, previous employers, etc.  Tagging is optional, and thus far we’ve seen an adoption rate of about 20% of our 55,000 employee organization. We are focusing on “tagging moments” to encourage employees to tag, e.g., at new hire orientation, at promotions, at each annual review process, after completion of a course/certification. The goal is to encourage more employees to tag, and to keep tags fresh for those who have already done so.

           

          While this isn’t strictly DAM, it is a non-compulsory tool we’ve had recent experience with. I hope this helps.

           

          Margaret Ostrander
          Sr. Knowledge Strategist

          Thomson Reuters

          Phone: 651.848.8552

          margaret.ostrander@...

        • William.Bitunjac
          Hi Michael, I have a few secret recipes that I ve been using. The majority of my work has been in the development of asset and knowledge management tools
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 11, 2009
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            Hi Michael,

             

            I have a few secret recipes that I’ve been using.  The majority of my work has been in the development of asset and knowledge management tools outside of compliance areas where user adoption is key to realizing proposed benefits and long term program success.  To make it even more relevant the bulk of my work has been in content management for marketing and Digital Asset Management where creativity runs high and tool adoption runs low.

             

            Here are a few of the methods I’ve been using with a good degree of success:

             

            1.       Leverage the metadata in the system to produce reports that tell business leaders HOW to tools are helping them reach their goals and WHO is using the tools to reach them.   I find quite often that the combination of system logs and solid taxonomy work helps connect disparate pieces of data into snapshots for how the business around the system is performing. 

             

            EXAMPLE – I can use system logs and shared metadata in Digital Asset Management and Marketing Resource Management systems to show how much money a project team saved on a Marketing Campaign by binding assets, to projects, projects to people, people to budgets, budgets to marketing campaigns and Marketing Campaigns to sales.  When the Campaign snapshot report comes out I can tell you how much money was saved using DAM and how much time using the MRM workflow tool.  So expense management, efficient organization and sales performance are part of each review.

             

            2.        Find ways to Leaders to call out the heroes:  For a few months after a system release we crash VP and EVP meetings to share stories about employees who use tools to help achieve organizational goals.  The VP is always rewarding the employee (not the system development group) for helping further an organizational goal (not for using the tool).   The net result is recognition by an executive – which everybody wants – and a reminder that the tool was developed against an organizational goal, so opting out of the tool is opting out of your organizations business plan.

             

            3.       Find ways to get the business leaders to make it part of performance management.  I use the content metadata, system logs and workflow reports to demonstrate how well team members are performing their tasks in the tool and offer them to the employees first and leadership second.  The first step is to let people know the tool can show them how productive they can be (with the offer to let them take their productivity reports to their bosses as a demonstration of their great work) and then after the employees have had 1-2 weeks to monitor their own performance offer those same reports to their leadership.  I’ve found that many employees use the automated tracking in the systems and productivity reports to address workload issues in their area when they are understaffed!  We’ve also seen some movement to have use of the systems added to personal goals and objectives.

             

            4.       Publish reports!  We publish weekly reports to operational teams at a low level of detail, we publish monthly reports to area managers to get a snapshot of how their teams are doing and we create an annual report for each system to follow up on the benefits case, highlight any big wins and create call-to-action items for executive leadership.  We also use the annual report to call out new investment opportunities in light of recent successes or highlight teams who are driving towards organizational goals using the tools.  I’ve even had one of these distributed at a board of directors meeting to validate a tech investment they were nervous about and secure additional funding.

             

            In the end good metadata, system logs and story telling were always the key to success.

             

            William Bitunjac | Manager, Target.com Digital Asset Managemnt , Content Management, Catalog &  Site Management | ¤Target |  1000 Nicollet Mall, TP3-8576| Minneapolis, Mn 55403| 612.304.6220

             

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