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Re: [TaxoCoP] Orphan terms in thesauruses

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  • marijane white
    William Denton s How to Make a Faceted Classification and Put it on the Web is a good place to start, in my experience.
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 19, 2009
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      William Denton's "How to Make a Faceted Classification and Put it on the Web" is a good place to start, in my experience.

      http://www.miskatonic.org/library/facet-web-howto.html


      On Fri, Jun 19, 2009 at 2:41 AM, Gabriel Tanase <gabtanase@...> wrote:


      Hello,

      Could you recommend a book or two, or perhaps a series articles available online, from which a beginner might learn about, and how to do, facet analysis? Doesn't need to be a whole book dedicated to this; one good chapter would do.

      Thank you very much,
      Gabriel
      http://www.linkedin.com/in/gabrieltanase


      2009/6/18 Leonard Will <L.Will@...>

      On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 at 08:24:02, Webindexing
      <webindexing@...> wrote
      >There is (I think) a general assumption that all terms in a thesaurus
      >should be neatly grouped under, say, 20 top terms. In practice, it is
      >often difficult to allocate a broader term to every term in a thesaurus
      >without some distortion.
      >
      >Is there any reason why every term has to have a broader term? Is there
      >anything wrong with many top terms? I am looking for general principles
      >that would apply across a range of projects.
      >
      >Thanks,
      >
      >Glenda.

      I think that it is often helpful to apply facet analysis to the concepts
      being organised, so that we group concepts depending on the fundamental
      categories to which they belong. Thus we can group them into facets such
      as "objects", "materials", "living things", "people", "organizations",
      "abstract concepts", "places" and so on. These facet names can become
      top terms of hierarchies.

      Each orphan term will belong to a facet such as these, and this is the
      initial step in constructing hierarchies, because hierarchical
      relationships can only apply to concepts in the same facet. (Part/whole
      relationships may sometimes break this rule, but these should be used
      only in certain specific and limited circumstances.)

      This top-down approach has to be used in conjunction with the bottom-up
      approach of examining concepts and considering what relationships they
      should have, but it does avoid having a lot of orphans.

      Leonard
      --
      Willpower Information     (Partners: Dr Leonard D Will, Sheena E Will)
      Information Management Consultants            Tel: +44 (0)20 8372 0092
      27 Calshot Way                              L.Will@...
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    • Patrick Lambe
      Gabriel My book Organising Knowledge has an extensive discussion of facets and facet analysis with examples and further references. Facet analysis is a
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 28, 2009
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        Gabriel

        My book 'Organising Knowledge' has an extensive discussion of facets and facet analysis with examples and further references. Facet analysis is a process of abstraction and is not always intuitive to the "general user" (which can compromise their ability to exploit facets in categorisation and search/browse), and it can fall victim to logical "high science" where facets are developed because they are possible or logical, rather than because they reflect important user perspectives on content. 

        P

        Patrick Lambe

        website: www.straitsknowledge.com

        Have you seen our KM Method Cards?   http://www.straitsknowledge.com/store/



        On Jun 19, 2009, at 5:41 PM, Gabriel Tanase wrote:



        Hello,

        Could you recommend a book or two, or perhaps a series articles available online, from which a beginner might learn about, and how to do, facet analysis? Doesn't need to be a whole book dedicated to this; one good chapter would do.

        Thank you very much,
        Gabriel
        http://www.linkedin .com/in/gabrielt anase


        2009/6/18 Leonard Will <L.Will@willpowerinf o.co.uk>
        On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 at 08:24:02, Webindexing
        <webindexing@ optusnet. com.au> wrote
        >There is (I think) a general assumption that all terms in a thesaurus
        >should be neatly grouped under, say, 20 top terms. In practice, it is
        >often difficult to allocate a broader term to every term in a thesaurus
        >without some distortion.
        >
        >Is there any reason why every term has to have a broader term? Is there
        >anything wrong with many top terms? I am looking for general principles
        >that would apply across a range of projects.
        >
        >Thanks,
        >
        >Glenda.

        I think that it is often helpful to apply facet analysis to the concepts
        being organised, so that we group concepts depending on the fundamental
        categories to which they belong. Thus we can group them into facets such
        as "objects", "materials", "living things", "people", "organizations",
        "abstract concepts", "places" and so on. These facet names can become
        top terms of hierarchies.

        Each orphan term will belong to a facet such as these, and this is the
        initial step in constructing hierarchies, because hierarchical
        relationships can only apply to concepts in the same facet. (Part/whole
        relationships may sometimes break this rule, but these should be used
        only in certain specific and limited circumstances. )

        This top-down approach has to be used in conjunction with the bottom-up
        approach of examining concepts and considering what relationships they
        should have, but it does avoid having a lot of orphans.

        Leonard
        --
        Willpower Information     (Partners: Dr Leonard D Will, Sheena E Will)
        Information Management Consultants            Tel: +44 (0)20 8372 0092
        27 Calshot Way                              L.Will@Willpowerinf o.co.uk
        ENFIELD                                Sheena.Will@ Willpowerinfo. co.uk
        EN2 7BQ, UK                            http://www.willpowe rinfo.co. uk/



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