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RE: [TaxoCoP] The value of Taxonomy

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  • iris tutuarima
    Thank you for all your help. Bob the presentation is very helpful thank you very much. So is the article from Marcia and the further elaboration by Patrick,
    Message 1 of 26 , Jun 19, 2008
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      Thank you for all your help. Bob the presentation is very helpful thank you very much. So is the article from Marcia and the further elaboration by Patrick, Lisa and Mike.
       
      iris

      "Smith, Lisa" <lsmith@...> wrote:
      Exactly along the lines that Marcia discusses in her response, one of my favorite articles is Undiscovered Public Knowledge by Don Swanson. Written some years ago and with some theoretical criticisms that followed it, but the gist of it so key to this discussion: The juxtaposition of knowledge objects via some classification creates new knowledge:
       
      "Imagine that the pieces of a puzzle are independently designed and created, and that, when retrieved and assembled, they then reveal a pattern – undesigned, unintended, and never before seen, yet a pattern that commands interest and invites interpretation. So it is, I claim, that independently created pieces of knowledge can harbor an unseen, unknown, and unintended pattern. And so it is that the world of recorded knowledge can yield genuinely new discoveries"
       
      Lisa Smith
      Director, Taxonomy
      Business.com® - an R.H. Donnelley company 
      310-586-4198 office
      310-586-4054 fax
      lsmith@business. com
      www.business. com
       

      As the leading business search engine and directory and pay-per-click advertising network, Business.com is a “must buy” for B2B advertisers.
      Latest News - Business.com named to Los Angeles Business Journal’s list of Best Places to Work. Click here to read more.
       


      From: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com [mailto:TaxoCoP@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Marcia Morante
      Sent: Thursday, June 19, 2008 6:53 AM
      To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com
      Subject: RE: [TaxoCoP] The value of Taxonomy

      In addition to Bob’s presentation, there’s an article written by a Gartner analyst in 2004 that makes some interesting points.
      The folks in your organization who see the taxonomy as just a “classification scheme” for explicit knowledge are missing the point.  Being able to find a specific document is great, but what happens next?  Sometimes, it will save the hours spent creating a new document when the old one could have reused.  Perhaps the author of that document is an expert in his/her subject area; you’ve made a connection that would not happen otherwise.   You are sure to come up with other downstream benefits that are specific to your organization. 
      Taxonomies are commonly used today to classify the content stored in expert systems, wikis, blogs , Email and other knowledge sharing applications.   Here’s where the value of a common enterprise vocabulary comes into play. 
      Good luck.
      Marcia
      Marcia Morante
      KCurve, Inc.
      (718)881-5915 - NY office
      (917)821-2087 - mobile
      From: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com [mailto:TaxoCoP@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bob Bater
      Sent: Thursday, June 19, 2008 8:30 AM
      To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com
      Subject: RE: [TaxoCoP] The value of Taxonomy
      Iris,
      I fully endorse the responses which Patrick and Mike have made to your enquiry. I was myself in your position some years ago where I needed to show how taxonomies and thesauri could support KM. The resulting pilot project, I think, did just that. I presented the results at an NKOS (Networked Knowledge Organization Systems) workshop in Vienna in 2005. The presentation is freely downloadable from http://www2. db.dk/nkos2005/ Bob%20Bater. pdf.
      Hope it helps.
      Bob
      From: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com [mailto:TaxoCoP@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of iris tutuarima
      Sent: 19 June 2008 07:57
      To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com
      Subject: [TaxoCoP] The value of Taxonomy
      Hi,
      I have joined this group for quite sometimes as a silent participant. The knowledge management community in which I am a member, is going to hold a seminar on building Taxonomy in August, 2008.
      The value of taxonomy keeps on popping up everytime we discuss the link between taxonomy and knowledge management. . Basically there are two views, one group believes that taxonomy is a classficiation scheme. It assists the organization of explicit knowledge. The other group believes that taxonomy is not just a  classification scheme. It offers other values such as integrating tacit and explicit knowledge through a knowledge map, it provides context and meaning and in the end it is a universal language in an organization that makes decision making at one's finger tip.
      Any of you has any opinions, references or best practices that relates to this issue ?
      Thank you.
      iris
       

    • Aruna Govindaraju
      Hello, I am very new to this group and to the concept of Taxonomy . I work mainly with search engines & often come across use of the word taxonomy in
      Message 2 of 26 , Jun 21, 2008
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        Hello, 

        I am very new to this group and to the concept of "Taxonomy". I work mainly with search engines & often come across use of the word "taxonomy" in different contexts. Mike's note gave me an idea as to what I could have within a taxonomy. But I still have a few "very basic" questions. Any inputs will be very helpful!
        1.  Is Taxonomy , a physical or a logical existence of content classified ?  (My understanding is that it is physical)
        2.  When search engine vendors talk about "Seamless Integration with Database taxonomy"  or "integration with ECMS taxonomy", what are they talking about ?  Do they mean that the product is capable of creating a taxonomy  on top of database and ECMS? Or is the product expecting us to have a  taxonomy pre-built in a specific format on top of database with which it can integrate ?
        3. Should taxonomy be tied to search engines? Can we avoid changes in taxonomy when migrating from one search engine to another?
        4. If I have 4 different sources , per say -  web, oracle db, FileNet content server and documentum , when do i decide if I need a global taxonomy across all the 4 differnt sources and what should be my strategy to build that taxonomy ?

        And one last question - is there a "Taxonomy 101 for dummies"? :)

        Any help is most appreciated !
        Thanks & Regards,
        Aruna G.
        Enterprise Search Analyst,
        Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp
        http://cognizant.com


        "Gardner, Mike" <Micheal.Gardner@...> wrote:
        To me the business value of taxonomy is exactly that, it has to provide value to the underlying business otherwise it may as well not exist.
         
        So how does it do this:
        I think it depends a little on what you mean by taxonomy, so I am just going to talk about some of the components:
         
        Lexicon / Glossary - For a business to be effective it needs to be talking the same language (and I don't mean English vs French). Problems start when everyone has different interpretations of a term and leave a meeting thinking they all agreed with their interpretation. Having a common vocabulary can greatly ease communication within a business and even with clients of that business.
         
        Thesaurus - By this I mean the synonym capabilities (acronyms as well). In particular these become important when integrated with a search engine. Keeping a list can assist newcomers get to grips with all the three letter acronyms (and others) in a company, so get people up to speed. But if these terms can be integrated in to your search engine such that searching for KM returns Knowledge Management (and vice versa), you can then provide business benefit as people can find all instances of the term across the business.
         
        Structures - The relationship of terms and consistent management of folder structures can assist the business in finding content. If there is a consistent structure used then the business knows where to go to find content and who to talk to (as folders normally have owners). Even if you move around the business, a consistent structure can mean that even working in a different area you have an understanding of where to go to find content.
         
        Metadata - probably the biggest benefit is the application of metadata to websites and content, which enable users to find content more easily. You can perform a simple search internally in a business to try to find content around a term, but with a good search engine you may get many documents back. I demonstrated this in EDS where I used the term proposal. We have around 750,000 documents in the repository and the returns were huge as documents that referenced proposals were also returned. However, if we have a number of metadata fields available that can help people determine exactly what they want 9and the users know how to use them) then by selecting things like a Document Type = proposal, Approved Content, for an Industry = Government in a Region = Americas, we were quickly able to restrict the number of documents returned to a small number which the users could then use as a template. So where is the business value in this. If the user had not been able to find the documents they may well have spent quite some time writing the document from scratch (say 30 man days). Now they had a template to use as a basis and could do the job in 5 man days, saving something like 25 man days. If a business can do this even a small number of times the business benefits quickly rise..  
         
        Mike Gardner
        EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization Leader
        Telephone: +44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office)
        Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991
        Work from home, Derby, UK
        micheal.gardner@ eds.com
        We deliver on our commitments so you can deliver on yours.
        This email contains information which is confidential and may be privileged. Unless you are the intended addressee (or authorised to receive for the addressee) you may not use, forward, copy or disclose to anyone this email or any information contained in this email. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender by reply email immediately and delete this email.
        Electronic Data Systems Ltd
        Registered Office:, Lansdowne House, Berkeley Square, London  W1J 6ER
        Registered in England no: 53419
        VAT number: 432 99 5915
         


        From: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com [mailto:TaxoCoP@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe
        Sent: 19 June 2008 08:07
        To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com
        Subject: Re: [TaxoCoP] The value of Taxonomy

        Nice to see you here Iris - as you know I'm on the "beyond a classification scheme" end of the spectrum, but I think this is not just an ideological distinction (though it is also that). Sometimes it's a very pragmatic distinction in the sense that people doing taxonomy work have a predefined role, prior training, expectations and deliverables that constrain them into one side of the spectrum or the other.

        I think this is because enterprises are still just getting to grips with the idea that people, knowledge, information and data are connected, and cannot be coordinated in support of organisational effectiveness if they are managed in technical silos  which is the condition we are in now. I'll be speaking on this at the "Advancing Business Classification Initiatives" Conference next week in Sydney if anyone in that part of the world is interested.

        Patrick


        On 19 Jun 2008, at 2:57 PM, iris tutuarima wrote:

        Hi,
        I have joined this group for quite sometimes as a silent participant. The knowledge management community in which I am a member, is going to hold a seminar on building Taxonomy in August, 2008.
        The value of taxonomy keeps on popping up everytime we discuss the link between taxonomy and knowledge management. . Basically there are two views, one group believes that taxonomy is a classficiation scheme. It assists the organization of explicit knowledge. The other group believes that taxonomy is not just a  classification scheme. It offers other values such as integrating tacit and explicit knowledge through a knowledge map, it provides context and meaning and in the end it is a universal language in an organization that makes decision making at one's finger tip.
        Any of you has any opinions, references or best practices that relates to this issue ?
        Thank you.
        iris



      • Keipat Patkei
        Hey Aruna, Those are some really thought provoking questions for a Sunday morning! My answers are not new or revolutionary, just standing on the shoulders of
        Message 3 of 26 , Jun 22, 2008
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          Hey Aruna,

          Those are some really thought provoking questions for a Sunday morning! My answers are not new or revolutionary, just standing on the shoulders of many involved in this forum--Seth, Lou, Patrick, Fred, Christine, etc.--but I'll take a crack at them:

          A great part of the challenge of using the term "taxonomy" comes in trying to convey something meaningful or useful about it when it is used in so many different contexts. In my experience, there is a tendency to think of, discuss it, define it in extremes of broad and narrow, high- and low-levels in order to get a handle on it and "keep things in scope' at once. I would say be wary of definitions that are too narrow as they may be limiting or dismissive. On the other hand, the other end of the spectrum can be overwhelming.

          "Taxonomy," in the sense of being a process or study, is concerned with classifying. A specific instance of a taxonomy may be a syntactic arrangement of terms or codes or, to put it another way, a specific instance of a classification system. If I'm understanding your use of "physical [existence]" and "logical existence" correctly, considering these senses, I see that it could be both a physical existence of classified content and a logical existence in terms of validation rules for determining inclusion in a given class or at a particular node in a structure.

          When it comes to vendors, I don't know with which you've had discussions, but I would say that they are not necessarily expecting a pre-built taxonomy; however, if you have one in place and in use, they are probably expecting that your enterprise is accounting for and intending to leverage it with their app. Looking at it from another perspective, I've found that the sky's the limit on what vendor marketing or sales might lead you to think they expect, so better to have many discussions with individuals representing a given vendor's varying levels of perspective and interest.

          As for tying to any app, I think that a taxonomy should exist in such a way or environment that allows it to be flexible and change for various requirements and use-cases and not tie it to any one app. But much depends on the environment, strategy, and available resources in which the taxonomy is deployed or intended.

          Regarding different sources, I would say when you want to get a high level view of the content or want to aggregate it across the sources; also, when you want to understand what the content is about or provide one point of access to it.

          I really appreciate Patrick Lambe's recent book, ORGANISING KNOWLEDGE...but whether you'd think it's for "dummies" I'll leave up to you - Patrick might not appreciate me putting his book in that class, but I recommend it. Likewise for the Z39.19-2005 standard that Christine Connor mentioned recently. Seth has great info at his site, too. A good deal of what I've stated here has been derived from studying their excellent resources over the years.

          Keith DeWeese

          --- On Sun, 6/22/08, Aruna Govindaraju <arunagovindaraju@...> wrote:

          > From: Aruna Govindaraju <arunagovindaraju@...>
          > Subject: RE: [TaxoCoP] The value of Taxonomy
          > To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Sunday, June 22, 2008, 12:25 AM
          > Hello,
          >
          > I am very new to this group and to the concept of
          > "Taxonomy". I work mainly with search engines
          > & often come across use of the word
          > "taxonomy" in different contexts. Mike's note
          > gave me an idea as to what I could have within a taxonomy.
          > But I still have a few "very basic" questions.
          > Any inputs will be very helpful!
          > 1. Is Taxonomy , a physical or a logical existence of
          > content classified ? (My understanding is that it is
          > physical)
          > 2. When search engine vendors talk about "Seamless
          > Integration with Database taxonomy" or
          > "integration with ECMS taxonomy", what are they
          > talking about ? Do they mean that the product is capable
          > of creating a taxonomy on top of database and ECMS? Or is
          > the product expecting us to have a taxonomy pre-built in
          > a specific format on top of database with which it can
          > integrate ?
          > 3. Should taxonomy be tied to search engines? Can we
          > avoid changes in taxonomy when migrating from one search
          > engine to another?
          > 4. If I have 4 different sources , per say - web, oracle
          > db, FileNet content server and documentum , when do i
          > decide if I need a global taxonomy across all the 4
          > differnt sources and what should be my strategy to build
          > that taxonomy ?
          >
          > And one last question - is there a "Taxonomy 101 for
          > dummies"? :)
          >
          > Any help is most appreciated !
          > Thanks & Regards,
          > Aruna G.
          > Enterprise Search Analyst,
          > Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp
          > http://cognizant.com
          >
          >
          > "Gardner, Mike" <Micheal.Gardner@...>
          > wrote:
          > To me the business value of taxonomy is exactly that, it
          > has to provide value to the underlying business otherwise
          > it may as well not exist.
          >
          > So how does it do this:
          > I think it depends a little on what you mean by taxonomy,
          > so I am just going to talk about some of the components:
          >
          > Lexicon / Glossary - For a business to be effective it
          > needs to be talking the same language (and I don't mean
          > English vs French). Problems start when everyone has
          > different interpretations of a term and leave a meeting
          > thinking they all agreed with their interpretation. Having
          > a common vocabulary can greatly ease communication within
          > a business and even with clients of that business.
          >
          > Thesaurus - By this I mean the synonym capabilities
          > (acronyms as well). In particular these become important
          > when integrated with a search engine. Keeping a list can
          > assist newcomers get to grips with all the three letter
          > acronyms (and others) in a company, so get people up to
          > speed. But if these terms can be integrated in to your
          > search engine such that searching for KM returns
          > Knowledge Management (and vice versa), you can then
          > provide business benefit as people can find all instances
          > of the term across the business.
          >
          > Structures - The relationship of terms and consistent
          > management of folder structures can assist the business in
          > finding content. If there is a consistent structure used
          > then the business knows where to go to find content and
          > who to talk to (as folders normally have owners). Even if
          > you move around the business, a consistent structure can
          > mean that even working in a different area you have an
          > understanding of where to go to find content.
          >
          > Metadata - probably the biggest benefit is the
          > application of metadata to websites and content, which
          > enable users to find content more easily. You can perform
          > a simple search internally in a business to try to find
          > content around a term, but with a good search engine you
          > may get many documents back. I demonstrated this in EDS
          > where I used the term proposal. We have around 750,000
          > documents in the repository and the returns were huge as
          > documents that referenced proposals were also returned.
          > However, if we have a number of metadata fields available
          > that can help people determine exactly what they want 9and
          > the users know how to use them) then by selecting things
          > like a Document Type = proposal, Approved Content, for an
          > Industry = Government in a Region = Americas, we were
          > quickly able to restrict the number of documents returned
          > to a small number which the users could then use as a
          > template. So where is the business value in this. If the
          > user had
          > not been able to find the documents they may well have
          > spent quite some time writing the document from scratch
          > (say 30 man days). Now they had a template to use as a
          > basis and could do the job in 5 man days, saving something
          > like 25 man days. If a business can do this even a small
          > number of times the business benefits quickly rise..
          >
          > Mike Gardner
          > EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content
          > Rationalization Leader
          > Telephone: +44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office)
          > Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991
          > Work from home, Derby, UK
          > micheal.gardner@...
          > We deliver on our commitments so you can deliver on
          > yours.
          > This email contains information which is confidential
          > and may be privileged. Unless you are the intended
          > addressee (or authorised to receive for the addressee) you
          > may not use, forward, copy or disclose to anyone this
          > email or any information contained in this email. If you
          > have received this email in error, please advise the sender
          > by reply email immediately and delete this email.
          > Electronic Data Systems Ltd
          > Registered Office:, Lansdowne House, Berkeley Square,
          > London W1J 6ER
          > Registered in England no: 53419
          > VAT number: 432 99 5915
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > From: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patrick
          > Lambe
          > Sent: 19 June 2008 08:07
          > To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: Re: [TaxoCoP] The value of Taxonomy
          >
          >
          >
          > Nice to see you here Iris - as you know I'm on
          > the "beyond a classification scheme" end of
          > the spectrum, but I think this is not just an ideological
          > distinction (though it is also that). Sometimes it's a
          > very pragmatic distinction in the sense that people
          > doing taxonomy work have a predefined role, prior
          > training, expectations and deliverables that constrain them
          > into one side of the spectrum or the other.
          >
          >
          > I think this is because enterprises are still just
          > getting to grips with the idea that people, knowledge,
          > information and data are connected, and cannot be
          > coordinated in support of organisational effectiveness if
          > they are managed in technical silos which is the
          > condition we are in now. I'll be speaking on this
          > at the "Advancing Business Classification
          > Initiatives" Conference next week in Sydney if
          > anyone in that part of the world is interested.
          >
          >
          > Patrick
          >
          > Patrick Lambe
          >
          >
          > weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
          > website: www.straitsknowledge.com
          > book: www.organisingknowledge.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On 19 Jun 2008, at 2:57 PM, iris tutuarima wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hi,
          > I have joined this group for quite sometimes as a
          > silent participant. The knowledge management
          > community in which I am a member, is going to hold a
          > seminar on building Taxonomy in August, 2008.
          > The value of taxonomy keeps on popping up everytime
          > we discuss the link between taxonomy and knowledge
          > management. . Basically there are two views, one
          > group believes that taxonomy is a classficiation scheme. It
          > assists the organization of explicit knowledge. The
          > other group believes that taxonomy is not just a
          > classification scheme. It offers other values such as
          > integrating tacit and explicit knowledge through a knowledge
          > map, it provides context and meaning and in the end it
          > is a universal language in an organization that makes
          > decision making at one's finger tip.
          > Any of you has any opinions, references or best
          > practices that relates to this issue ?
          > Thank you.
          > iris
        • aredmondneal
          Hi, Aruna, Welcome! You will find a wealth and variety of information and opinions in this group. I suggest an additional book as a great source of information
          Message 4 of 26 , Jun 22, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi, Aruna,

            Welcome! You will find a wealth and variety of information and
            opinions in this group.

            I suggest an additional book as a great source of information on
            taxonomies: Building Enterprise Taxonomies by Darin Stewart.
            Stewart's book includes basic and practical advice, more nuts and
            bolts, while also addressing the global planning aspects of taxonomy
            construction and implementation. With no slight intended, it may be
            closer to the "dummies" book you seek. Patrick Lambe's book, which I
            also recommend, offers great insight and guidance at a relatively
            high level of strategic planning.

            I also agree with Keith DeWeese's comments about considerations
            fitting a taxonomy into other systems. Taxonomy modules that are an
            integral part of a CMS usually lack features you should expect for
            supporting a full and rich thesaurus. They may support only one or
            two hierarchy levels or ignore associative and synonym relationships
            and notes, thereby limiting the ultimate value of the
            taxonomy/thesaurus for various implementations. An external taxonomy
            tool should be able to integrate easily with existing systems,
            importing and exporting in recognized formats, not bound to the tool.
            Ability to work with various formats, e.g. XML, SKOS, HTML, et al.,
            underlies "seamless integration".

            As for tying to search engines, they should be able to take advantage
            of an inverted index which should include taxonomy terms applied as
            subject metadata. You shouldn't need to modify the taxonomy for the
            requirements of one engine vs. another.

            Best of luck on your taxonomy adventures,
            Alice
            --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com, Aruna Govindaraju
            <arunagovindaraju@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello,
            >
            > I am very new to this group and to the concept of "Taxonomy". I
            work mainly with search engines & often come across use of the
            word "taxonomy" in different contexts. Mike's note gave me an idea
            as to what I could have within a taxonomy. But I still have a
            few "very basic" questions. Any inputs will be very helpful!
            > 1. Is Taxonomy , a physical or a logical existence of content
            classified ? (My understanding is that it is physical)
            > 2. When search engine vendors talk about "Seamless Integration
            with Database taxonomy" or "integration with ECMS taxonomy", what
            are they talking about ? Do they mean that the product is capable
            of creating a taxonomy on top of database and ECMS? Or is the
            product expecting us to have a taxonomy pre-built in a specific
            format on top of database with which it can integrate ?
            > 3. Should taxonomy be tied to search engines? Can we avoid
            changes in taxonomy when migrating from one search engine to another?
            > 4. If I have 4 different sources , per say - web, oracle db,
            FileNet content server and documentum , when do i decide if I need a
            global taxonomy across all the 4 differnt sources and what should be
            my strategy to build that taxonomy ?
            >
            > And one last question - is there a "Taxonomy 101 for dummies"? :)
            >
            > Any help is most appreciated !
            > Thanks & Regards,
            > Aruna G.
            > Enterprise Search Analyst,
            > Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp
            > http://cognizant.com
            >
            >
            > "Gardner, Mike" <Micheal.Gardner@...>
            wrote:
            > To me the business value of taxonomy is exactly that, it has to
            provide value to the underlying business otherwise it may as well
            not exist.
            >
            > So how does it do this:
            > I think it depends a little on what you mean by taxonomy, so I
            am just going to talk about some of the components:
            >
            > Lexicon / Glossary - For a business to be effective it needs to
            be talking the same language (and I don't mean English vs French).
            Problems start when everyone has different interpretations of a term
            and leave a meeting thinking they all agreed with their
            interpretation. Having a common vocabulary can greatly ease
            communication within a business and even with clients of that
            business.
            >
            > Thesaurus - By this I mean the synonym capabilities (acronyms
            as well). In particular these become important when integrated with
            a search engine. Keeping a list can assist newcomers get to grips
            with all the three letter acronyms (and others) in a company, so
            get people up to speed. But if these terms can be integrated in to
            your search engine such that searching for KM returns Knowledge
            Management (and vice versa), you can then provide business benefit
            as people can find all instances of the term across the business.
            >
            > Structures - The relationship of terms and consistent
            management of folder structures can assist the business in finding
            content. If there is a consistent structure used then the business
            knows where to go to find content and who to talk to (as folders
            normally have owners). Even if you move around the business, a
            consistent structure can mean that even working in a different area
            you have an understanding of where to go to find content.
            >
            > Metadata - probably the biggest benefit is the application of
            metadata to websites and content, which enable users to find
            content more easily. You can perform a simple search internally in a
            business to try to find content around a term, but with a good
            search engine you may get many documents back. I demonstrated this
            in EDS where I used the term proposal. We have around 750,000
            documents in the repository and the returns were huge as documents
            that referenced proposals were also returned. However, if we have a
            number of metadata fields available that can help people determine
            exactly what they want 9and the users know how to use them) then by
            selecting things like a Document Type = proposal, Approved Content,
            for an Industry = Government in a Region = Americas, we were
            quickly able to restrict the number of documents returned to a
            small number which the users could then use as a template. So where
            is the business value in this. If the user had
            > not been able to find the documents they may well have spent
            quite some time writing the document from scratch (say 30 man
            days). Now they had a template to use as a basis and could do the
            job in 5 man days, saving something like 25 man days. If a business
            can do this even a small number of times the business benefits
            quickly rise..
            >
            > Mike Gardner
            > EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization
            Leader
            > Telephone: +44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office)
            > Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991
            > Work from home, Derby, UK
            > micheal.gardner@...
            > We deliver on our commitments so you can deliver on yours.
            > This email contains information which is confidential and may
            be privileged. Unless you are the intended addressee (or authorised
            to receive for the addressee) you may not use, forward, copy or
            disclose to anyone this email or any information contained in this
            email. If you have received this email in error, please advise the
            sender by reply email immediately and delete this email.
            > Electronic Data Systems Ltd
            > Registered Office:, Lansdowne House, Berkeley Square, London W1J
            6ER
            > Registered in England no: 53419
            > VAT number: 432 99 5915
            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > From: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe
            > Sent: 19 June 2008 08:07
            > To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [TaxoCoP] The value of Taxonomy
            >
            >
            >
            > Nice to see you here Iris - as you know I'm on the "beyond
            a classification scheme" end of the spectrum, but I think this is
            not just an ideological distinction (though it is also that).
            Sometimes it's a very pragmatic distinction in the sense that
            people doing taxonomy work have a predefined role, prior
            training, expectations and deliverables that constrain them into
            one side of the spectrum or the other.
            >
            >
            > I think this is because enterprises are still just getting to
            grips with the idea that people, knowledge, information and data
            are connected, and cannot be coordinated in support of
            organisational effectiveness if they are managed in technical
            silos which is the condition we are in now. I'll be speaking on
            this at the "Advancing Business Classification Initiatives"
            Conference next week in Sydney if anyone in that part of the world
            is interested.
            >
            >
            > Patrick
            >
            > Patrick Lambe
            >
            >
            > weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
            > website: www.straitsknowledge.com
            > book: www.organisingknowledge.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > On 19 Jun 2008, at 2:57 PM, iris tutuarima wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hi,
            > I have joined this group for quite sometimes as a silent
            participant. The knowledge management community in which I am a
            member, is going to hold a seminar on building Taxonomy in
            August, 2008.
            > The value of taxonomy keeps on popping up everytime we
            discuss the link between taxonomy and knowledge management. .
            Basically there are two views, one group believes that taxonomy
            is a classficiation scheme. It assists the organization of
            explicit knowledge. The other group believes that taxonomy is
            not just a classification scheme. It offers other values such
            as integrating tacit and explicit knowledge through a knowledge
            map, it provides context and meaning and in the end it is a
            universal language in an organization that makes decision
            making at one's finger tip.
            > Any of you has any opinions, references or best practices
            that relates to this issue ?
            > Thank you.
            > iris
            >
          • Patrick Lambe
            Personally I believe dummie s guide to taxonomies is as close to an oxymoron as you can get - taxonomy work requires so much intellectual effort I believe it
            Message 5 of 26 , Jun 22, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Personally I believe "dummie's guide to taxonomies" is as close to an oxymoron as you can get - taxonomy work requires so much intellectual effort I believe it excludes dummies from even wanting to do it ;-)

              I'm touched by the comments on my book, I would echo Alice's recommendation of Darin Stewart's book. I'm reading it right now, and it complements my book very nicely. Where I focus on taxonomy work (context, strategy, process), Darin makes a really good job of explaining all the important building blocks for implementing taxonomies within an enterprise infrastructure (eg metadata, standards).

              Patrick


              On 23 Jun 2008, at 4:59 AM, aredmondneal wrote:

              Hi, Aruna, 

              Welcome! You will find a wealth and variety of information and 
              opinions in this group.

              I suggest an additional book as a great source of information on 
              taxonomies: Building Enterprise Taxonomies by Darin Stewart. 
              Stewart's book includes basic and practical advice, more nuts and 
              bolts, while also addressing the global planning aspects of taxonomy 
              construction and implementation. With no slight intended, it may be 
              closer to the "dummies" book you seek. Patrick Lambe's book, which I 
              also recommend, offers great insight and guidance at a relatively 
              high level of strategic planning. 


            • jstudiman
              In the interest of developing a shared vocabulary (!) I have to reply to Mike Gardner s characterization of a thesaurus. I find it very interesting that even
              Message 6 of 26 , Jun 23, 2008
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                In the interest of developing a shared vocabulary (!) I have to reply
                to Mike Gardner's characterization of a thesaurus. I find it very
                interesting that even within the information community there can be
                so many different understandings of definitions.

                In my experience, a thesaurus is one kind of controlled vocabulary
                along a spectrum of complexity. A tool with only "synonym
                capabilities" is best described as a synonym ring. A thesaurus is
                much more complex, containing synonyms, but also related terms, and
                broader and narrower terms in hierarchical relationships. Thesauri
                also often contain scope notes defining how a term should be used in
                an organizational context. In effect a thesaurus can be a taxonomy.
                It can be used as a tool not only to assist search through synonyms,
                but also to guide searchers or indexers to the correct term using
                browsing. A thesaurus makes explicit the relationships between terms
                as used in any particular field, community, or organization. They
                can provide essential context to help find information.

                These distinctions can be particularly important when it comes to
                talking about functionality, and the capabilities of any content
                management software.

                --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com, "Gardner, Mike" <Micheal.Gardner@...>
                wrote:

                > Thesaurus - By this I mean the synonym capabilities (acronyms as
                well).
                > In particular these become important when integrated with a search
                > engine. Keeping a list can assist newcomers get to grips with all
                the
                > three letter acronyms (and others) in a company, so get people up to
                > speed. But if these terms can be integrated in to your search engine
                > such that searching for KM returns Knowledge Management (and vice
                > versa), you can then provide business benefit as people can find all
                > instances of the term across the business.
                >
                > Structures - The relationship of terms and consistent management of
                > folder structures can assist the business in finding content. If
                there
                > is a consistent structure used then the business knows where to go
                to
                > find content and who to talk to (as folders normally have owners).
                Even
                > if you move around the business, a consistent structure can mean
                that
                > even working in a different area you have an understanding of where
                to
                > go to find content.
              • Syed Suhail Ahmad
                Hello all, I just created a social networking site regarding enterprise architecture and SOA and look for my friends and associates to join...please consider
                Message 7 of 26 , Jun 24, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hello all,
                   
                  I  just created a social networking site regarding enterprise architecture and SOA and look for my friends and associates to join...please consider my proposal.
                   
                  Regards
                   
                  Syed Ahmad

                • kovacici
                  Syed, Please send the link fo the site. Regards, Ivan ... architecture and SOA and look for my friends and associates to join...please consider my proposal.
                  Message 8 of 26 , Jun 24, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Syed,

                    Please send the link fo the site.

                    Regards,
                    Ivan

                    --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com, Syed Suhail Ahmad
                    <samizaki_ahmad@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello all,
                    >
                    > I just created a social networking site regarding enterprise
                    architecture and SOA and look for my friends and associates to
                    join...please consider my proposal.
                    >
                    > Regards
                    >
                    > Syed Ahmad
                    >
                  • Syed Suhail Ahmad
                    My mistake, I will resend with the link.   Syed ... From: kovacici Subject: [TaxoCoP] Re: Anything Enterprise Architecture To:
                    Message 9 of 26 , Jun 25, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment

                      My mistake, I will resend with the link.

                       

                      Syed

                      --- On Tue, 6/24/08, kovacici <ikovacic@...> wrote:

                      From: kovacici <ikovacic@...>
                      Subject: [TaxoCoP] Re: Anything Enterprise Architecture
                      To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2008, 10:46 PM

                      Syed,

                      Please send the link fo the site.

                      Regards,
                      Ivan

                      --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com, Syed Suhail Ahmad
                      <samizaki_ahmad@ ...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello all,
                      >
                      > I just created a social networking site regarding enterprise
                      architecture and SOA and look for my friends and associates to
                      join...please consider my proposal.
                      >
                      > Regards
                      >
                      > Syed Ahmad
                      >


                    • Aruna Govindaraju
                      Thanks-you Alice, KeiPat, Patrick , I found all your responses very useful and I was able to get a conceptual understanding of what Taxonomy is all about.
                      Message 10 of 26 , Jun 25, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment

                        Thanks-you Alice, KeiPat, Patrick ,

                        I found all your responses very useful and I was able to get a conceptual understanding of what Taxonomy is all about. Thanks for suggesting the books too. I am sure to pick them soon . 

                         

                        Also, I appologize for not responding individually to all your emails . I had been out on business and just caught up on all my unreads.

                         

                        Have a great rest of the week,

                        Aruna G.

                        Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp

                        --- On Mon, 6/23/08, aredmondneal <aredmondneal@...> wrote:

                        From: aredmondneal <aredmondneal@...>
                        Subject: [TaxoCoP] Re: The value of Taxonomy
                        To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Monday, June 23, 2008, 2:29 AM

                        Hi, Aruna,

                        Welcome! You will find a wealth and variety of information and
                        opinions in this group.

                        I suggest an additional book as a great source of information on
                        taxonomies: Building Enterprise Taxonomies by Darin Stewart.
                        Stewart's book includes basic and practical advice, more nuts and
                        bolts, while also addressing the global planning aspects of taxonomy
                        construction and implementation. With no slight intended, it may be
                        closer to the "dummies" book you seek. Patrick Lambe's book, which I
                        also recommend, offers great insight and guidance at a relatively
                        high level of strategic planning.

                        I also agree with Keith DeWeese's comments about considerations
                        fitting a taxonomy into other systems. Taxonomy modules that are an
                        integral part of a CMS usually lack features you should expect for
                        supporting a full and rich thesaurus. They may support only one or
                        two hierarchy levels or ignore associative and synonym relationships
                        and notes, thereby limiting the ultimate value of the
                        taxonomy/thesaurus for various implementations. An external taxonomy
                        tool should be able to integrate easily with existing systems,
                        importing and exporting in recognized formats, not bound to the tool.
                        Ability to work with various formats, e.g. XML, SKOS, HTML, et al.,
                        underlies "seamless integration" .

                        As for tying to search engines, they should be able to take advantage
                        of an inverted index which should include taxonomy terms applied as
                        subject metadata. You shouldn't need to modify the taxonomy for the
                        requirements of one engine vs. another.

                        Best of luck on your taxonomy adventures,
                        Alice
                        --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com, Aruna Govindaraju
                        <arunagovindaraju@ ...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hello,
                        >
                        > I am very new to this group and to the concept of "Taxonomy". I
                        work mainly with search engines & often come across use of the
                        word "taxonomy" in different contexts. Mike's note gave me an idea
                        as to what I could have within a taxonomy. But I still have a
                        few "very basic" questions. Any inputs will be very helpful!
                        > 1. Is Taxonomy , a physical or a logical existence of content
                        classified ? (My understanding is that it is physical)
                        > 2. When search engine vendors talk about "Seamless Integration
                        with Database taxonomy" or "integration with ECMS taxonomy", what
                        are they talking about ? Do they mean that the product is capable
                        of creating a taxonomy on top of database and ECMS? Or is the
                        product expecting us to have a taxonomy pre-built in a specific
                        format on top of database with which it can integrate ?
                        > 3. Should taxonomy be tied to search engines? Can we avoid
                        changes in taxonomy when migrating from one search engine to another?
                        > 4. If I have 4 different sources , per say - web, oracle db,
                        FileNet content server and documentum , when do i decide if I need a
                        global taxonomy across all the 4 differnt sources and what should be
                        my strategy to build that taxonomy ?
                        >
                        > And one last question - is there a "Taxonomy 101 for dummies"? :)
                        >
                        > Any help is most appreciated !
                        > Thanks & Regards,
                        > Aruna G.
                        > Enterprise Search Analyst,
                        > Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp
                        > http://cognizant. com
                        >
                        >
                        > "Gardner, Mike" <Micheal.Gardner@ ...>
                        wrote:
                        > To me the business value of taxonomy is exactly that, it has to
                        provide value to the underlying business otherwise it may as well
                        not exist.
                        >
                        > So how does it do this:
                        > I think it depends a little on what you mean by taxonomy, so I
                        am just going to talk about some of the components:
                        >
                        > Lexicon / Glossary - For a business to be effective it needs to
                        be talking the same language (and I don't mean English vs French).
                        Problems start when everyone has different interpretations of a term
                        and leave a meeting thinking they all agreed with their
                        interpretation. Having a common vocabulary can greatly ease
                        communication within a business and even with clients of that
                        business.
                        >
                        > Thesaurus - By this I mean the synonym capabilities (acronyms
                        as well). In particular these become important when integrated with
                        a search engine. Keeping a list can assist newcomers get to grips
                        with all the three letter acronyms (and others) in a company, so
                        get people up to speed. But if these terms can be integrated in to
                        your search engine such that searching for KM returns Knowledge
                        Management (and vice versa), you can then provide business benefit
                        as people can find all instances of the term across the business.
                        >
                        > Structures - The relationship of terms and consistent
                        management of folder structures can assist the business in finding
                        content. If there is a consistent structure used then the business
                        knows where to go to find content and who to talk to (as folders
                        normally have owners). Even if you move around the business, a
                        consistent structure can mean that even working in a different area
                        you have an understanding of where to go to find content.
                        >
                        > Metadata - probably the biggest benefit is the application of
                        metadata to websites and content, which enable users to find
                        content more easily. You can perform a simple search internally in a
                        business to try to find content around a term, but with a good
                        search engine you may get many documents back. I demonstrated this
                        in EDS where I used the term proposal. We have around 750,000
                        documents in the repository and the returns were huge as documents
                        that referenced proposals were also returned. However, if we have a
                        number of metadata fields available that can help people determine
                        exactly what they want 9and the users know how to use them) then by
                        selecting things like a Document Type = proposal, Approved Content,
                        for an Industry = Government in a Region = Americas, we were
                        quickly able to restrict the number of documents returned to a
                        small number which the users could then use as a template. So where
                        is the business value in this. If the user had
                        > not been able to find the documents they may well have spent
                        quite some time writing the document from scratch (say 30 man
                        days). Now they had a template to use as a basis and could do the
                        job in 5 man days, saving something like 25 man days. If a business
                        can do this even a small number of times the business benefits
                        quickly rise..
                        >
                        > Mike Gardner
                        > EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization
                        Leader
                        > Telephone: +44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office)
                        > Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991
                        > Work from home, Derby, UK
                        > micheal.gardner@ ...
                        > We deliver on our commitments so you can deliver on yours.
                        > This email contains information which is confidential and may
                        be privileged. Unless you are the intended addressee (or authorised
                        to receive for the addressee) you may not use, forward, copy or
                        disclose to anyone this email or any information contained in this
                        email. If you have received this email in error, please advise the
                        sender by reply email immediately and delete this email.
                        > Electronic Data Systems Ltd
                        > Registered Office:, Lansdowne House, Berkeley Square, London W1J
                        6ER
                        > Registered in England no: 53419
                        > VAT number: 432 99 5915
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------ --------- --------- ---
                        > From: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com
                        [mailto:TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe
                        > Sent: 19 June 2008 08:07
                        > To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com
                        > Subject: Re: [TaxoCoP] The value of Taxonomy
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Nice to see you here Iris - as you know I'm on the "beyond
                        a classification scheme" end of the spectrum, but I think this is
                        not just an ideological distinction (though it is also that).
                        Sometimes it's a very pragmatic distinction in the sense that
                        people doing taxonomy work have a predefined role, prior
                        training, expectations and deliverables that constrain them into
                        one side of the spectrum or the other.
                        >
                        >
                        > I think this is because enterprises are still just getting to
                        grips with the idea that people, knowledge, information and data
                        are connected, and cannot be coordinated in support of
                        organisational effectiveness if they are managed in technical
                        silos which is the condition we are in now. I'll be speaking on
                        this at the "Advancing Business Classification Initiatives"
                        Conference next week in Sydney if anyone in that part of the world
                        is interested.
                        >
                        >
                        > Patrick
                        >
                        > Patrick Lambe
                        >
                        >
                        > weblog: www.greenchameleon. com
                        > website: www.straitsknowledg e.com
                        > book: www.organisingknowl edge.com
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > On 19 Jun 2008, at 2:57 PM, iris tutuarima wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Hi,
                        > I have joined this group for quite sometimes as a silent
                        participant. The knowledge management community in which I am a
                        member, is going to hold a seminar on building Taxonomy in
                        August, 2008.
                        > The value of taxonomy keeps on popping up everytime we
                        discuss the link between taxonomy and knowledge management. .
                        Basically there are two views, one group believes that taxonomy
                        is a classficiation scheme. It assists the organization of
                        explicit knowledge. The other group believes that taxonomy is
                        not just a classification scheme. It offers other values such
                        as integrating tacit and explicit knowledge through a knowledge
                        map, it provides context and meaning and in the end it is a
                        universal language in an organization that makes decision
                        making at one's finger tip.
                        > Any of you has any opinions, references or best practices
                        that relates to this issue ?
                        > Thank you.
                        > iris
                        >


                      • Syed Suhail Ahmad
                        Please try this link , http://enterprisestewards.ning.com/ . There are not much content right now but we are hoping this would be a great social networking
                        Message 11 of 26 , Jun 26, 2008
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                          Please try this link , http://enterprisestewards.ning.com/ . There are not much content right now but we are hoping this would be a great social networking site for architects (IT & business).

                           

                          Syed Ahmad

                          --- On Tue, 6/24/08, kovacici <ikovacic@...> wrote:

                          From: kovacici <ikovacic@...>
                          Subject: [TaxoCoP] Re: Anything Enterprise Architecture
                          To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2008, 10:46 PM

                          Syed,

                          Please send the link fo the site.

                          Regards,
                          Ivan

                          --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups .com, Syed Suhail Ahmad
                          <samizaki_ahmad@ ...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hello all,
                          >
                          > I just created a social networking site regarding enterprise
                          architecture and SOA and look for my friends and associates to
                          join...please consider my proposal.
                          >
                          > Regards
                          >
                          > Syed Ahmad
                          >


                        • Joe Shepley
                          Iris, This is a great question, as I consistently encounter these two, sometimes conflicting, views in my taxonomy engagements. The short answer is that
                          Message 12 of 26 , Jul 2, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Iris,

                            This is a great question, as I consistently encounter these two,
                            sometimes conflicting, views in my taxonomy engagements.

                            The short answer is that taxonomy can both provide classification
                            schemes to organize explicit knowledge and help integrate tacit and
                            explicit knowledge (as well as many other things besides). I didn't
                            come to taxonomy work in the usual way, i.e., from a library science
                            background. Instead, I first got involved in taxonomy deeply as part
                            of my doctoral work in the history of exegesis as a way to help make
                            sense of the texts, communities, and interpretations I was analyzing.
                            So although I later got grounding in library science approaches, I've
                            continued to view taxonomy as something that could contribute not
                            only to how an organization classifies information, but to other
                            organizational goals as well (vision, branding, marketplace analysis,
                            strategic planning, knowledge management, etc.).

                            Although there's a lot of great resources out there, I would
                            recommend beginning with Patrick Lambe's work
                            (http://www.greenchameleon.com/). In particular, his latest book,
                            Organising Knowledge (http://www.organisingknowledge.com/), is
                            wonderful and would be directly relevant to the issue you raise in
                            your post.

                            I hope this helps. I'd be more than happy to continue this
                            conversation with you--please feel free to contact me if you'd like
                            to do so.

                            Cheers!

                            Joe
                          • iris tutuarima
                            Thank you Joe. This question has been boggling my mind for sometimes. This issue is what I intend to brought up in our forthcoming workshop. Patrick will be
                            Message 13 of 26 , Jul 2, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment

                              Thank you Joe. This question has been boggling my mind for sometimes. This issue is what I intend to brought up in our forthcoming workshop. Patrick will be the main speaker. Indeed I share  your view that taxonomy has so much hidden values that need to be raised. It's a common language that integrate and sysnergized an organization.I will certainly get back to you for further discussions since we are still digging out further values of taxonomy.

                               

                              iris



                              --- On Thu, 7/3/08, Joe Shepley <jshepley@...> wrote:

                              From: Joe Shepley <jshepley@...>
                              Subject: [TaxoCoP] Re: The value of Taxonomy
                              To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 12:02 AM

                              Iris,

                              This is a great question, as I consistently encounter these two,
                              sometimes conflicting, views in my taxonomy engagements.

                              The short answer is that taxonomy can both provide classification
                              schemes to organize explicit knowledge and help integrate tacit and
                              explicit knowledge (as well as many other things besides). I didn't
                              come to taxonomy work in the usual way, i.e., from a library science
                              background. Instead, I first got involved in taxonomy deeply as part
                              of my doctoral work in the history of exegesis as a way to help make
                              sense of the texts, communities, and interpretations I was analyzing.
                              So although I later got grounding in library science approaches, I've
                              continued to view taxonomy as something that could contribute not
                              only to how an organization classifies information, but to other
                              organizational goals as well (vision, branding, marketplace analysis,
                              strategic planning, knowledge management, etc.).

                              Although there's a lot of great resources out there, I would
                              recommend beginning with Patrick Lambe's work
                              (http://www.greencha meleon.com/). In particular, his latest book,
                              Organising Knowledge (http://www.organisi ngknowledge. com/), is
                              wonderful and would be directly relevant to the issue you raise in
                              your post.

                              I hope this helps. I'd be more than happy to continue this
                              conversation with you--please feel free to contact me if you'd like
                              to do so.

                              Cheers!

                              Joe


                            • Joe Shepley
                              Iris, Is this a public workshop? It sounds like a wonderful event! Glad you found my answer helpful... Cheers, Joe
                              Message 14 of 26 , Jul 3, 2008
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                                Iris,

                                Is this a public workshop? It sounds like a wonderful event!

                                Glad you found my answer helpful...

                                Cheers,

                                Joe
                              • iris tutuarima
                                Yes, it is. The KM Community in which I am a member conduct the workshop. Thank you so much for your input. ... From: Joe Shepley
                                Message 15 of 26 , Jul 3, 2008
                                • 0 Attachment

                                  Yes, it is. The KM Community in which I am a member conduct the workshop. Thank you so much for your input.



                                  --- On Thu, 7/3/08, Joe Shepley <jshepley@...> wrote:

                                  From: Joe Shepley <jshepley@...>
                                  Subject: [TaxoCoP] Re: The value of Taxonomy
                                  To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
                                  Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 7:13 PM

                                  Iris,

                                  Is this a public workshop? It sounds like a wonderful event!

                                  Glad you found my answer helpful...

                                  Cheers,

                                  Joe


                                • Joe Shepley
                                  Could you provide details? It sounds like something I would like to attend. Thanks!
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Jul 9, 2008
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Could you provide details? It sounds like something I would like to
                                    attend.

                                    Thanks!
                                  • lucytorres_bp
                                    I d be interested in the details also. Lucy Torres ... participant. The knowledge management community in which I am a member, is going to hold a seminar on
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Jul 9, 2008
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      I'd be interested in the details also.

                                      Lucy Torres


                                      --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com, iris tutuarima <iris_tutuarima@...>
                                      wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Hi,
                                      > I have joined this group for quite sometimes as a silent
                                      participant. The knowledge management community in which I am a member,
                                      is going to hold a seminar on building Taxonomy in August, 2008.
                                      >
                                    • iris tutuarima
                                      To Joe and Lucy, Im sorry for responding a bit late. I ve been away for a holiday and has just arrived back at my desk. Enclosed please find the detail of the
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Jul 16, 2008
                                      • 0 Attachment

                                        To Joe and Lucy,

                                        Im sorry for responding a bit late. I've been away for a holiday and has just arrived back at my desk. Enclosed please find the detail of the workshop.

                                        iris

                                        --- On Wed, 7/9/08, Joe Shepley <jshepley@...> wrote:

                                        From: Joe Shepley <jshepley@...>
                                        Subject: [TaxoCoP] Re: The value of Taxonomy
                                        To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
                                        Date: Wednesday, July 9, 2008, 11:55 PM

                                        Could you provide details? It sounds like something I would like to
                                        attend.

                                        Thanks!


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