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RE: [TaxoCoP] End users and sub-categories

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  • Ron Daniel
    Hi Jordan, ... first/broadest ... A counter-example that comes to mind is eBay, where lay users typically do classify their content to the finest level of
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 9, 2008
      Hi Jordan,

      > Does anyone have any input as to lay users (not professional
      > cataloguers/indexers) usage of non top level categories. The assumption
      > being that many end users will classify their content to the
      first/broadest
      > category and not take the time to navigate to the most relevant category.

      A counter-example that comes to mind is eBay, where lay users typically do
      classify their content to the finest level of detail.

      eBay tooling provides a little help with that, where you can enter a name of
      an item to be auctioned and it suggests one or more categories, but the
      biggest factor is motivation. Tightly-categorized items sell for more than
      loosely-categorized ones, because it is easier for a lot of people to find
      them which leads to more bids. Therefore sellers are motivated to categorize
      in depth. If your lay users have a good motivation to categorize deeply,
      they will tend to do so.

      Best regards,
      Ron
      On Jan 9, 2008 1:46 PM, Jordan Cassel <jordan_cassel@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > My company released a hierarchical classification system for users to
      > categorize their questions related to Automobiles in which community
      members
      > and SMEs can respond. Similar to a Yahoo! Answers or Amazon Askville
      system
      > but for Auto.
      >
      > I'm looking at the initial counts of questions per category and while I
      see
      > a drop off in questions associated to sub-level (2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc. tier)
      > categories, I'm not sure if it is excessive. Most important factor is that
      > questions are associated to the most appropriate category but before
      > reviewing the actual questions I was interested in any related experience
      of
      > others.
      >
      > Does anyone have any input as to lay users (not professional
      > cataloguers/indexers) usage of non top level categories. The assumption
      > being that many end users will classify their content to the
      first/broadest
      > category and not take the time to navigate to the most relevant category.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Jordan
      >
    • Patrick Lambe
      On reading this thread I was thinking that the motivation to classify more finely will count for a great deal, and Ron s example gives a good illustration. If
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 9, 2008
        On reading this thread I was thinking that the motivation to classify more finely will count for a great deal, and Ron's example gives a good illustration. If I'm classifying a document into a repository for possible future use by somebody else, there's very little self interest at work. Perhaps posting a question I'm more motivated because I'd like my question answered and not lost in a generalist cloud at the top. On eBay there's money at the end of the classification tree! 

        Nice question.

        Patrick


        On 10 Jan 2008, at 7:50 AM, Ron Daniel wrote:

        Hi Jordan,

        > Does anyone have any input as to lay users (not professional
        > cataloguers/ indexers) usage of non top level categories. The assumption
        > being that many end users will classify their content to the
        first/broadest
        > category and not take the time to navigate to the most relevant category.

        A counter-example that comes to mind is eBay, where lay users typically do
        classify their content to the finest level of detail.

        eBay tooling provides a little help with that, where you can enter a name of
        an item to be auctioned and it suggests one or more categories, but the
        biggest factor is motivation. 

      • Jordan Cassel
        Thanks for your feedback Ron. Good point about the motivation ($) factor to incent users to categorize properly on eBay. -Jordan ... From: Ron Daniel
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 10, 2008

          Thanks for your feedback Ron. Good point about the motivation ($) factor to incent users to categorize properly on eBay.

          -Jordan

          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Ron Daniel <rdaniel@...>
          To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, January 9, 2008 3:50:45 PM
          Subject: RE: [TaxoCoP] End users and sub-categories

          Hi Jordan,

          > Does anyone have any input as to lay users (not professional
          > cataloguers/ indexers) usage of non top level categories. The assumption
          > being that many end users will classify their content to the
          first/broadest
          > category and not take the time to navigate to the most relevant category.

          A counter-example that comes to mind is eBay, where lay users typically do
          classify their content to the finest level of detail.

          eBay tooling provides a little help with that, where you can enter a name of
          an item to be auctioned and it suggests one or more categories, but the
          biggest factor is motivation. Tightly-categorized items sell for more than
          loosely-categorized ones, because it is easier for a lot of people to find
          them which leads to more bids. Therefore sellers are motivated to categorize
          in depth. If your lay users have a good motivation to categorize deeply,
          they will tend to do so.

          Best regards,
          Ron
          On Jan 9, 2008 1:46 PM, Jordan Cassel <jordan_cassel@ yahoo.com> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hi,
          >
          > My company released a hierarchical classification system for users to
          > categorize their questions related to Automobiles in which community
          members
          > and SMEs can respond. Similar to a Yahoo! Answers or Amazon Askville
          system
          > but for Auto.
          >
          > I'm looking at the initial counts of questions per category and while I
          see
          > a drop off in questions associated to sub-level (2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc. tier)
          > categories, I'm not sure if it is excessive. Most important factor is that
          > questions are associated to the most appropriate category but before
          > reviewing the actual questions I was interested in any related experience
          of
          > others.
          >
          > Does anyone have any input as to lay users (not professional
          > cataloguers/ indexers) usage of non top level categories. The assumption
          > being that many end users will classify their content to the
          first/broadest
          > category and not take the time to navigate to the most relevant category.
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Jordan
          >





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