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new to Taxonomy Community of Practice

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  • Jeff Pekrul
    Hello Taxonomy Community of Practice, Hello, my name is Jeff Pekrul, I recently joined Genentech as a data architect. Genentech is a rapidly growing
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 12, 2005
      Hello Taxonomy Community of Practice,
       
      Hello, my name is Jeff Pekrul, I recently joined Genentech as a data architect. Genentech is a rapidly growing biotechnology company. The IT organization is beginning a process of re-architecting key operational systems, and implementing an ERP system. Taxonomies may be a useful way of organizing business and scientific information for search by both internal and external users. Genentech does not yet have a well-defined data governance process, or a metadata repository.
       
      As I consider taxonomies, one challenge I see is how to prioritize this relative to other data governance and metadata needs. With limited resources, it may make sense to focus first on reconciling and centralizing silos of metadata, and developing a data governance process, before tackling taxonomies. The metadata repository tools I'm most familiar with are not oriented towards taxonomies, but it may be that others (for example SchemaLogic) would address all the needs, which might allow us to deliver some taxonomies relatively soon. If others in the discussion group have faced similar situations, I would be very interested in hearing what approaches have worked or not worked.
       
      Jeff Pekrul
       
      Genentech, Inc.
    • Seth Earley
      Hi Jeff, Welcome to the group. That is a really good question. Where do you spend your time and energy to get the greatest bang for the buck? I think your
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 12, 2005
        Hi Jeff,
         
        Welcome to the group.  That is a really good question.  Where do you spend your time and energy to get the greatest bang for the buck?  I think your perspective as a data architect is somewhat unique in that you are considering a bigger picture of metadata that spans multiple systems.  Many of the taxo projects I have been on have focused on a narrower field - such as a content management system or portal application.  In these projects we recognized the need to communicate with data architects and leverage work that was already done in development of data dictionaries and enterprise metadata standards, but focused on a more defined business problem (such as helping service reps be more productive, etc).  
         
        One question to ask is "Who's writing the check?"  Of course their project is most important.  :-)  Or is there a defined problem that is most visible that would help people better understand your project (and therefore commit resources) if it were solved?
         
        At a recent engagement, we were trying to prioritize where to focus the taxo development.  We created a matrix that allowed us to rank the different areas in terms of impact, feasibility, visibility, complexity, span of control, numbers of documents, etc.  Each area was rated low, medium or high.  An ideal project would have high impact, high visibility (maybe - one might want to learn on a low visibility project), high span of control, high feasibility, etc. 
         
        For example: 
        Audience - Sales Organization
        Impact - High (this was a high value project)
        Visibility - High (this would be seen by managers and employees throughout the organization)
        Feasibility - Medium (I forgot how we determined this - it may have been based on numbers of document authors or some other criteria)
        Span of control - Low (these docs were not controlled by the group doing the project)
         
        If there were very large volumes of documents that needed to be retagged, this might make the project less attractive since resources were limited.
         
        You get the picture. 
         
        Anyone else have experience with this kind of challenge?
         

        Seth Earley

        Earley & Associates, Inc

        781-444-0287

        781-820-8080 cell

        Next taxo conference call July 27th 2 PM EDT
        "Best Practices in Taxonomy Deployment"
        Registration and agenda at
        www.earley.com/events.htm

        Taxonomy Community of Practice

        http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/TaxoCoP/

        -----Original Message-----
        From: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Jeff Pekrul
        Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2005 5:14 PM
        To: Taxo
        Subject: [TaxoCoP] new to Taxonomy Community of Practice

        Hello Taxonomy Community of Practice,
         
        Hello, my name is Jeff Pekrul, I recently joined Genentech as a data architect. Genentech is a rapidly growing biotechnology company. The IT organization is beginning a process of re-architecting key operational systems, and implementing an ERP system. Taxonomies may be a useful way of organizing business and scientific information for search by both internal and external users. Genentech does not yet have a well-defined data governance process, or a metadata repository.
         
        As I consider taxonomies, one challenge I see is how to prioritize this relative to other data governance and metadata needs. With limited resources, it may make sense to focus first on reconciling and centralizing silos of metadata, and developing a data governance process, before tackling taxonomies. The metadata repository tools I'm most familiar with are not oriented towards taxonomies, but it may be that others (for example SchemaLogic) would address all the needs, which might allow us to deliver some taxonomies relatively soon. If others in the discussion group have faced similar situations, I would be very interested in hearing what approaches have worked or not worked.
         
        Jeff Pekrul
         
        Genentech, Inc.
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