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Re: Need input for eContent article

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  • aredmondneal
    Hi, Darin, As for platforms and applications using XML for taxonomies, Thesaurus Master is a dedicated taxonomy/thesaurus management tool, the producer of
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 1, 2006
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      Hi, Darin,

      As for platforms and applications using XML for taxonomies, Thesaurus
      Master is a dedicated taxonomy/thesaurus management tool, the producer
      of which (Access Innovations) saw XML's and potential and adopted it
      early on. The product imports XML and exports in XML, OWL, and SKOS,
      among other formats. It is designed to work with an indexing tool and
      content management system (M.A.I. and XIS [XML Intranet System]), also
      both XML-based, but integrates with other systems as well. Because of
      its flexibility, we and many clients collectively manage a large
      number of thesauri with XML as the foundation of Thesaurus Master.
      (More details on request)

      Alice
      Data Harmony/Access Innovations

      --- In TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com, "Darin Stewart" <stewarda@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello all *
      > I am in the process of writing an article on "Taxonomies and XML"
      for the March issue of eContent magazine. I would like to feature the
      thoughts and experiences of members of this community. Specifically,
      I would like your input in the following areas.
      >
      > What is the role of XML in taxonomy development, management and
      application?
      >
      > Are there situations in which XML is not appropriate?
      >
      > What are the minimum XML capabilities a CMS or Search system
      should have to adequately leverage taxonomies?
      >
      > Which platforms and applications currently have the best or most
      innovative approaches to XML and taxonomies? Have any come up with a
      better approach that doesn't use XML?
      >
      > What capabilities are needed that are not currently available?
      >
      > What constitutes a good Taxonomy XML schema?
      >
      > Are you currently using XML to manage taxonomies (or have you in
      the past)? If so, how and what has the experience been like?
      >
      > War stories and philosophical positions are very welcome. I would
      like to make the article as practical as possible, illustrating it
      with the experience and insights of practitioners such as yourselves.
      I think this could stimulate some interesting discussion on the list,
      but feel free to respond to me off-list if you prefer. Unfortunately,
      I'm on a tight deadline so I'll need to collect everything by the end
      of the week. Everything will be fully attributed unless you let me
      know that you would prefer to remain anonymous. Thanks for your thoughts.
      >
      > -dls-
      >
      >
      > Darin L. Stewart, Ph.D.
      > Director, Research Information Services
      > Oregon Health & Science University
      > 503.494.9119
      >
    • Seth Earley
      Hi Darin, Here is my 2 cents in 10 minutes between calls. I agree with Brendan - XML is a catch all to describe a data format that is meaningless when it comes
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 1, 2006
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        Hi Darin,

        Here is my 2 cents in 10 minutes between calls.

        I agree with Brendan - XML is a catch all to describe a data format that is
        meaningless when it comes to appropriate functionality. It is a check box
        for most (or all) vendors. It is a trivial matter to export to XML and even
        to import (from a technical perspective). Making the XML meaningful is
        about format, structure, process, context and application.

        Let's imagine that you wanted to develop an automated XML feed from one
        system to another for integration of taxonomy terms. If the taxonomy
        changes, the change should be reflected elsewhere. There is no standard way
        of doing that since XML transforms will have to be written for the
        applications in order to make the taxonomy "consumable" by a subscribing
        system. But we also need oversight and change control to be sure we are not
        breaking something. So the question is about the purpose for integration
        and process for managing changes.

        Saying your system is XML based is a little like saying "we use
        computers"... Technically correct, but not meaningful in terms of value and
        "fitness to purpose" (to quite Tony Byrne).

        Seth

        Seth Earley
        Earley & Associates, Inc
        781-444-0287
        781-820-8080 cell

        Blog: "Not Otherwise Categorized"
        https://sethearley.wordpress.com

        -----Original Message-----
        From: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        Darin Stewart
        Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2006 6:42 PM
        To: TaxoCoP@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [TaxoCoP] Need input for eContent article

        Hello all *
        I am in the process of writing an article on "Taxonomies and XML" for the
        March issue of eContent magazine. I would like to feature the thoughts and
        experiences of members of this community. Specifically, I would like your
        input in the following areas.

        What is the role of XML in taxonomy development, management and
        application?

        Are there situations in which XML is not appropriate?

        What are the minimum XML capabilities a CMS or Search system should have
        to adequately leverage taxonomies?

        Which platforms and applications currently have the best or most
        innovative approaches to XML and taxonomies? Have any come up with a better
        approach that doesn't use XML?

        What capabilities are needed that are not currently available?

        What constitutes a good Taxonomy XML schema?

        Are you currently using XML to manage taxonomies (or have you in the
        past)? If so, how and what has the experience been like?

        War stories and philosophical positions are very welcome. I would like to
        make the article as practical as possible, illustrating it with the
        experience and insights of practitioners such as yourselves. I think this
        could stimulate some interesting discussion on the list, but feel free to
        respond to me off-list if you prefer. Unfortunately, I'm on a tight
        deadline so I'll need to collect everything by the end of the week.
        Everything will be fully attributed unless you let me know that you would
        prefer to remain anonymous. Thanks for your thoughts.

        -dls-


        Darin L. Stewart, Ph.D.
        Director, Research Information Services
        Oregon Health & Science University
        503.494.9119




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