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Re: dao of sailing

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  • --Michael
    ... [snip] ... On the water, always err on the side of caution.
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 1, 2008
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      --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "lisa" <ms_jade_li@...> wrote:

      [snip]

      > What do you think? Motor? No motor?

      On the water, always err on the side of caution.
    • lisa
      ... freaky that this guy is the author. at $1.50 it s worth checking out ($5 if you include shipping). books -- the best deal in town besides packets of
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 7, 2008
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        --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "John Leitz" <tntjd@...> wrote:
        >
        > Try the Tao of Sailing by Ray Grigg
        >

        freaky that this guy is the author. at $1.50 it's worth checking out
        ($5 if you include shipping). books -- the best deal in town besides
        packets of flower and vegetable seeds

        >
        >
        >
        http://www.amazon.com/Tao-Sailing-Ray-Grigg/dp/089334138X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8
        >
        <http://www.amazon.com/Tao-Sailing-Ray-Grigg/dp/089334138X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF
        > 8&s=books&qid=1217399707&sr=1-1> &s=books&qid=1217399707&sr=1-1
        >
      • lisa
        ... zone. ... it s just that zone that zz talks about with the archer and the cook... and the cicada catcher and the .....
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 7, 2008
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          --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "bradford hatcher" <bradford@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've found the Dao in several sports - whitewater rafting, surfing,
          > downhill skiing and even billiards. It seems to be that perfect line
          > or path that you take in those special moments when you are "in the
          zone."
          > In the butterfly stroke in swimming it's the perfect rhythm or
          > combination of stroke and kick that brings it all together.

          it's just that zone that zz talks about with the archer and the
          cook... and the cicada catcher and the .....
          >
        • lisa
          ... zone. ... My experience with the dao of sailing: It has been interesting to experience sailing from a total newbie state to an able to relax a little bit
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 4, 2008
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            --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "bradford hatcher" <bradford@...> wrote:
            >
            > I've found the Dao in several sports - whitewater rafting, surfing,
            > downhill skiing and even billiards. It seems to be that perfect line
            > or path that you take in those special moments when you are "in the
            zone."
            > In the butterfly stroke in swimming it's the perfect rhythm or
            > combination of stroke and kick that brings it all together.
            >

            My experience with the dao of sailing:

            It has been interesting to experience sailing from a total newbie
            state to an able to relax a little bit and enjoy it state. (This is
            as a passenger/occasional helper, not an actual sailor. That will be
            for another season.)

            The first time we went out the winds were very high, the water was
            choppy with whitecaps. It had been years since Bob had sailed and his
            first time with this boat. To put it mildly, I could have stroked and
            it would not have been surprising. We ended up shredding the jib (the
            lesser sail) and had a HELL of a time disengaging the mast from the
            top of the boat when we went to break it down that night. It was a
            thoroughly uncomfortable, terrifying, painful experience. Nobody in
            their right head would have gone back for more.

            The next time, and the next several times, Bob went sailing alone. My
            mind was still trying to process it all and my body was still trying
            to calm down from what I'll call trauma (Hey all of the symptoms were
            there!) I did need to go down to the lake when he was setting up and
            breaking down the mast at that point, so I was still around the boat
            and the water -- and still hearing about how much fun he was having
            out there. He got back "into the zone" of sailing and learned how
            this little boat moved in the wind and the water. He kept encouraging
            me to come along with him.

            Finally, in a moment of bravery -- madness? masochism? -- I agreed.
            I was a nervous wreck getting on the boat, body rigid, heart
            palpitating, trying to logically reconcile why I was doing it. The
            wind and the water were calmer this time. Bob was familiar with the
            boat and the sails now. I was starting to unwind a little bit, until
            we went away from the dock and headed toward a steel wall. Bob
            screamed at me to do something, but all I heard was a screaming voice
            and became paralyzed. So much for it being a pleasant stress-free
            experience, even with the improvements over the first time. I stayed
            rigid and stressed out for the rest of that sailing day, with
            "compound trauma". All through the ride I thought never again will I
            get on this boat. Please Lord just let me get to dry land again.

            Bob continued to go sailing, alone mostly, but sometimes ran across
            his brother out on the lake. He was getting better and better
            handling the boat and navigating the different weather and water
            conditions. He kept encouraging me to come along, attempting to allay
            my fears. He knew of my terror of the choppy water and the whipping
            sails and the boat tilting sideways in the water, but no mention was
            made of when he screamed. I was at a pre-contemplation stage of
            change at this point, existing in a survival state only.

            Little by little the shift to the contemplation stage happened. There
            was the pull of the beauty of the water and the sky and the landscape
            and the peace of gliding through the water. When it was too windy the
            jib wasn't used, making it quieter and slower than full speed ahead. I
            voiced my concerns about the screaming to Bob and said it was one of
            the main things keeping me off of the boat. He apologized and
            promised he wouldn't scream anymore, no matter what. I decided to
            give sailing another try, despite everything scary about it. Who was
            it who said, "Feel the fear, then do it anyway."?

            From then on the experience has been 95%+ pleasant. By my working
            through my fears, Bob becoming a better sailor with this boat and more
            mindful of things that were making my fears skyrocket, things have
            turned around.

            Anyone else care to share their experience of the dao of a particular
            sport or activity?

            rgds,
            lisa
          • lisa
            ... We got stuck on the lake last Saturday when the wind died at dusk at the end of the lake we were at. Thankfully we now have lights on the boat and had
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 4, 2008
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              --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "--Michael" <epsilon717@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "lisa" <ms_jade_li@> wrote:
              >
              > [snip]
              >
              > > What do you think? Motor? No motor?
              >
              > On the water, always err on the side of caution.
              >

              We got "stuck" on the lake last Saturday when the wind died at dusk at
              the end of the lake we were at. Thankfully we now have lights on the
              boat and had nowhere to go, so we sort of snailed along at maybe a
              half mile an hour for awhile. We had been told the trick of moving
              the rudder back and forth like a fish tail which kept us at least
              moving forward through the glassy water. Eventually the wind picked
              up and we headed steadily toward port. Even though it was not that
              big a deal to get stuck out there, we have reached consensus that we
              need at least a tiny motor.

              rgds,
              lisa
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