Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

"The day the music died."

Expand Messages
  • George Henry
    The entire song is a tribute to Buddy Holly and a commentary on how rock and roll changed in the years since his death. McLean seems to be lamenting the lack
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      "The entire song is a tribute to Buddy Holly and a commentary on
      how rock and roll changed in the years since his death.
      McLean seems to be lamenting the lack of "danceable" music in
      rock and roll and (in part) attributing that lack to the absence of Buddy
      Holly et. al."

      "Buddy Holly died on the night of February 2, 1959 in a plane
      crash in Iowa during a snowstorm. The news came to most of the
      world on the morning of February 3, which is why it's known as
      The Day The Music Died."

      When I was in Fort Benning there was a guy a few bunks down who
      looked like Buddy Holly and his thing when he was in the mood
      would be to play Buddy Holly records on his stereo all day long.

      Across from him there was a guy who would when he was in the mood
      play Elvis all day long.

      A few months before i was assigned there the company mail clerk
      left a note on his desk. He then picked up his .22 auto went
      across the hall to the orderly room where he shot the company
      clerk and the NCOIC. He then locked the door and did himself in.
      One of the things that the note mentioned was the fact that the
      "fucking music was driving him crazy." In this case the music
      didn't die but cotinued to be played. So it goes.

      An annotated FAQ of the lyrics of American Pie can be found at..

      http://www.faqs.org/faqs/music/american-pie/

      --
      g

      BTW a few months after my arrival I became the new company clerk.
    • Patrick Burrows
      heh. nice ending! ... -- -- Patrick Burrows http://www.CleverHumans.com
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        heh. nice ending!

        On Feb 1, 2008 9:01 AM, George Henry <gchenry@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > "The entire song is a tribute to Buddy Holly and a commentary on
        > how rock and roll changed in the years since his death.
        > McLean seems to be lamenting the lack of "danceable" music in
        > rock and roll and (in part) attributing that lack to the absence of Buddy
        > Holly et. al."
        >
        > "Buddy Holly died on the night of February 2, 1959 in a plane
        > crash in Iowa during a snowstorm. The news came to most of the
        > world on the morning of February 3, which is why it's known as
        > The Day The Music Died."
        >
        > When I was in Fort Benning there was a guy a few bunks down who
        > looked like Buddy Holly and his thing when he was in the mood
        > would be to play Buddy Holly records on his stereo all day long.
        >
        > Across from him there was a guy who would when he was in the mood
        > play Elvis all day long.
        >
        > A few months before i was assigned there the company mail clerk
        > left a note on his desk. He then picked up his .22 auto went
        > across the hall to the orderly room where he shot the company
        > clerk and the NCOIC. He then locked the door and did himself in.
        > One of the things that the note mentioned was the fact that the
        > "fucking music was driving him crazy." In this case the music
        > didn't die but cotinued to be played. So it goes.
        >
        > An annotated FAQ of the lyrics of American Pie can be found at..
        >
        > http://www.faqs.org/faqs/music/american-pie/
        >
        > --
        > g
        >
        > BTW a few months after my arrival I became the new company clerk.
        >
        >



        --
        --
        Patrick Burrows
        http://www.CleverHumans.com
      • lisa
        ... Buddy ... Maybe it was the trying to decide who was King that pushed him over the edge? ... Just read the FAQ. Have listened to that song a million times
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 2, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, George Henry <gchenry@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > "The entire song is a tribute to Buddy Holly and a commentary on
          > how rock and roll changed in the years since his death.
          > McLean seems to be lamenting the lack of "danceable" music in
          > rock and roll and (in part) attributing that lack to the absence of
          Buddy
          > Holly et. al."
          >
          > "Buddy Holly died on the night of February 2, 1959 in a plane
          > crash in Iowa during a snowstorm. The news came to most of the
          > world on the morning of February 3, which is why it's known as
          > The Day The Music Died."
          >
          > When I was in Fort Benning there was a guy a few bunks down who
          > looked like Buddy Holly and his thing when he was in the mood
          > would be to play Buddy Holly records on his stereo all day long.
          >
          > Across from him there was a guy who would when he was in the mood
          > play Elvis all day long.
          >
          > A few months before i was assigned there the company mail clerk
          > left a note on his desk. He then picked up his .22 auto went
          > across the hall to the orderly room where he shot the company
          > clerk and the NCOIC. He then locked the door and did himself in.
          > One of the things that the note mentioned was the fact that the
          > "fucking music was driving him crazy." In this case the music
          > didn't die but cotinued to be played. So it goes.

          Maybe it was the trying to decide who was King that pushed him over
          the edge?

          >
          > An annotated FAQ of the lyrics of American Pie can be found at..
          >
          > http://www.faqs.org/faqs/music/american-pie/

          Just read the FAQ. Have listened to that song a million times and new
          some of the references but not others. A couple of comments on the
          lyrics:

          "Can music save your mortal soul." is how it's listed in the FAQ. I
          always thought it said, "Can music save your mama's soul."

          "Moss grows fat on a rolling stone." There are a few hypotheses on
          this line, but one they didn't mention is Rolling Stone magazine and
          how they made a lot of money on the magazine but the coverage they
          gave wasn't necessarily to "the music" type of musicians but the ones
          the big labels wanted to promote.

          I remember my friend Theresa and I arguing over a line from the song.
          One of us thought it said, "I know that you're in love with him. Cuz
          I saw you dancin in the gym." and the other person thought it was
          "chin to chin"

          Wondering if there were any official memorial celebrations for the day
          the music died, similar to the Halloween party at Harry Houdini's
          grave, this was all I found, at wikipedia:

          "In 1988, Ken Paquette, a Wisconsin fan of the 1950s era, erected a
          stainless steel monument depicting a steel guitar and a set of three
          records bearing the names of each of the three performers.[3] The
          monument is located on private farmland, about one quarter of a mile
          west of the intersection of 315th Street and Gull Avenue, five miles
          north of Clear Lake.

          He also created a similar stainless steel monument to the three
          musicians located outside the Riverside Ballroom in Green Bay,
          Wisconsin, where Holly, the Big Bopper and Valens played on the night
          of February 1, 1959. This memorial was unveiled on July 17, 2003.[4]"

          Trying to think of what would be a good way to celebrate tomorrow, to
          re-animate the music for a day...

          rgds,
          --li

          >
          > --
          > g
          >
          > BTW a few months after my arrival I became the new company clerk.
          >


          My brother's girlfriend downloaded a zillion songs onto an ipod and
          sent it to him in Iraq. instead of a barrracks he sleeps in a storage
          container
        • --Michael
          I liked both movies. Different enough to be interesting. The novella, as one might expect, is rather different than the screenplays. If you enjoyed the movie
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 2, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            I liked both movies. Different enough to be interesting.

            The novella, as one might expect, is rather different than the
            screenplays. If you enjoyed the movie version, it's worth a read.


            -- Michael


            --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, George Henry <gchenry@...> wrote:
            >
            > On Sun, 27 Jan 2008, lisa wrote:
            >
            > > How often have you gone to or watched a movie and still felt
            hungry, like you consumed insubstantial fluff? Or gone to a movie
            that inexorably fries your brain with overambitious intellectualizing?
            Neither extreme is fruitful. When you're talking about the newer
            movies that usually run 90 minutes to 2 hrs tops, you also wonder how
            > > can the memes be planted with so little time...
            >
            > Somebody gave the synchronicity wheel a spin last week.. it was
            shown yesterday on either IFC or Sundance. I vaguely remember the
            Clooney version which in my opinion was not as good.
            >
          • John Panter
            Now, I always thought that the lines: Oh, and while the King was looking down The jester stole his thorny crown. referred to� an incident that is portrayed
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 3, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Now, I always thought that the lines:
              "Oh, and while the King was looking down
              The jester stole his thorny crown."
              referred to  an incident that is portrayed in the biographical movie
              Great Balls of Fire:   about Jerry Lee Lewis.
              There is a scene in the movie, Jerry Lee is alone in his house, late at night canoodling on a piano
              he had one in every room) The news has come that Elvis has been drafted and is to be sent to Germany. Elvis appears in the room in uniform. Whether this is real or a dream is not clarified. Anyway, Elvis sayas " I want you to take it, Jer' Lee! I want you to take it all!"
              This was after Jerry Lee's English tour had been cut short by public outrage when the word got out that he had married his 11 year old cousin. She was quoted in the press as not knowing what the fuss was about. Back home lots of girls were married at nine. Ah, Dixie!
              yers

              > --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, George Henry <gchenry@...> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > "The entire song is a tribute to Buddy Holly and a commentary on
              > > how rock and roll changed in the years since his death.
              > > McLean seems to be lamenting the lack of "danceable" music in
              > > rock and roll and (in part) attributing that lack to the absence of
              > Buddy
              > > Holly et. al."
              > >
              > > "Buddy Holly died on the night of February 2, 1959 in a plane
              > > crash in Iowa during a snowstorm. The news came to most of the
              > > world on the morning of February 3, which is why it's known as
              > > The Day The Music Died."
              > >
              > > When I was in Fort Benning there was a guy a few bunks down who
              > > looked like Buddy Holly and his thing when he was in the mood
              > > would be to play Buddy Holly records on his stereo all day long.
              > >
              > > Across from him there was a guy who would when he was in the mood
              > > play Elvis all day long.
              > >
              > > A few months before i was assigned there the company mail clerk
              > > left a note on his desk. He then picked up his .22 auto went
              > > across the hall to the orderly room where he shot the company
              > > clerk and the NCOIC. He then locked the door and did himself in.
              > > One of the things that the note mentioned was the fact that the
              > > "fucking music was driving him crazy." In this case the music
              > > didn't die but cotinued to be played. So it goes.
              >
              > Maybe it was the trying to decide who was King that pushed him over
              > the edge?
              >
              > >
              > > An annotated FAQ of the lyrics of American Pie can be found at..
              > >
              > > http://www.faqs.org/faqs/music/american-pie/
              >
              > Just read the FAQ. Have listened to that song a million times and new
              > some of the references but not others. A couple of comments on the
              > lyrics:
              >
              > "Can music save your mortal soul." is how it's listed in the FAQ. I
              > always thought it said, "Can music save your mama's soul."
              >
              > "Moss grows fat on a rolling stone." There are a few hypotheses on
              > this line, but one they didn't mention is Rolling Stone magazine and
              > how they made a lot of money on the magazine but the coverage they
              > gave wasn't necessarily to "the music" type of musicians but the ones
              > the big labels wanted to promote.
              >
              > I remember my friend Theresa and I arguing over a line from the song.
              > One of us thought it said, "I know that you're in love with him. Cuz
              > I saw you dancin in the gym." and the other person thought it was
              > "chin to chin"
              >
              > Wondering if there were any official memorial celebrations for the day
              > the music died, similar to the Halloween party at Harry Houdini's
              > grave, this was all I found, at wikipedia:
              >
              > "In 1988, Ken Paquette, a Wisconsin fan of the 1950s era, erected a
              > stainless steel monument depicting a steel guitar and a set of three
              > records bearing the names of each of the three performers.[3] The
              > monument is located on private farmland, about one quarter of a mile
              > west of the intersection of 315th Street and Gull Avenue, five miles
              > north of Clear Lake.
              >
              > He also created a similar stainless steel monument to the three
              > musicians located outside the Riverside Ballroom in Green Bay,
              > Wisconsin, where Holly, the Big Bopper and Valens played on the night
              > of February 1, 1959. This memorial was unveiled on July 17, 2003.[4]"
              >
              > Trying to think of what would be a good way to celebrate tomorrow, to
              > re-animate the music for a day...
              >
              > rgds,
              > --li
              >
              > >
              > > --
              > > g
              > >
              > > BTW a few months after my arrival I became the new company clerk.
              > >
              >
              > My brother's girlfriend downloaded a zillion songs onto an ipod and
              > sent it to him in Iraq. instead of a barrracks he sleeps in a storage
              > container
              >
              >

              John Panter, B.Sc.
              Certified Rolfer
              2374 Agricola St.           ph.   (902) 425-2612
              Halifax NS B3K 4B6          fax   (902) 422-1998
              Canada                  
              e-mail fareast@...
              http://www.johnpanterrolfer.com
            • bradford hatcher
              From Wikipedia, on the song. Don McLean s most famous composition, American Pie, is often interpreted as describing the deaths of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 3, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                From Wikipedia, on the song.

                Don McLean's most famous composition, "American Pie," is often
                interpreted as describing the deaths of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens
                and The Big Bopper in an airplane crash on February 3, 1959, spawning
                the phrase, "The Day the Music Died." McLean has stated that the
                lyrics are also somewhat autobiographical and present an abstract
                story of his life from the mid-1950s until the time he wrote the song
                in the late 1960s.[citation needed] The hometown legend is that "the
                levee" is his hometown bar, the Beechmont Tavern near Iona
                College.[citation needed] "American Pie" symbolizes the ongoing
                radical and tumultuous changes in popular music during this period,
                evolving from the often raw, upbeat sounds that marked the earliest
                days of rockabilly and the rock eras of the 1950s to the darker, more
                introspective, often cynical and increasingly socially conscious music
                of the late 1960s, driven by the sweeping social upheavals and
                volatile political atmosphere that had engulfed and defined America by
                the end of the decade.[citation needed]

                Don McLean's "American Pie" has remained the subject of intense
                scrutiny and philosophical interpretation for more than 30 years as
                music historians, scholars, professors of modern American literature,
                and his fans alike continue to search for its 'deeper meaning.' In
                interviews, Don claims to be amused that many interpretations start
                with the premise that he never talks about the song nor has ever
                provided insight into the meaning of the lyrics.[citation needed]
              • George Henry
                ... The song 65.. I was still in the army. The mag 67.. after I was discharged. In the beginning Jan Wenner distanced himself from the hippie music of the
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 4, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  On Sat, 2 Feb 2008, lisa wrote:


                  > "Moss grows fat on a rolling stone." There are a few hypotheses on
                  > this line, but one they didn't mention is Rolling Stone magazine and
                  > how they made a lot of money on the magazine but the coverage they
                  > gave wasn't necessarily to "the music" type of musicians but the ones
                  > the big labels wanted to promote.

                  The song 65.. I was still in the army.
                  The mag 67.. after I was discharged.

                  In the beginning Jan Wenner distanced himself from the hippie
                  music of the times.

                  You got me to thinking and I found the this on the Web.

                  Rollin' Stone (1950)
                  McKinley Morganfield AKA Muddy 'Mississippi' Waters

                  Muddy Waters - Rollin' Stone aka Catfish Blues
                  it was Muddy who added the rolling stone metaphor.


                  Well, I wish I was a catfish,
                  Swimmin in a oh, deep, blue sea.
                  I would have all you good lookin women,
                  Fishin, fishin after me.
                  Sure 'nough, a-after me.
                  Sure 'nough, a-after me.
                  Oh 'nough, oh 'nough, sure 'nough.

                  I went to my baby's house,
                  And I sit down oh, on her steps.
                  She said, "Now, come on in now, Muddy."
                  "You know, my husband just now left."
                  "Sure 'nough, he just now left."
                  "Sure 'nough, he just now left."
                  Sure 'nough, oh well, oh well.

                  Well, my mother told my father,
                  Just before hmmm, I was born,
                  "I got a boy child's comin,"
                  "He's gonna be, he's gonna be a rollin stone,"
                  "Sure 'nough, he's a rollin stone,"
                  "Sure 'nough, he's a rollin stone,"
                  Oh well he's a, oh well he's a, oh well he's a.

                  Well, I feel, yes I feel,
                  Feel that I could lay down oh, time ain't long.
                  I'm gonna catch the first thing smokin,
                  Back, back down the road I'm goin.
                  Back down the road I'm goin.
                  Back down the road I'm goin.
                  Sure 'nough back, sure 'nough back.

                  Muddy Waters - Rollin' Stone aka Catfish Blues
                  it was Muddy who added the rolling stone metaphor.

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaIT0mKJ7D0
                  Newport

                  There is also a Hank Williams hit in 1949 on the "B" side of a
                  78.

                  "Lost Highway"


                  Im a rollin stone all alone and lost
                  For a life of sin I have paid the cost
                  When I pass by all the people say
                  Just another guy on the lost highway

                  Just a deck of cards and a jug of wine
                  And a womans lies makes a life like mine
                  O the day we met, I went astray
                  I started rolling down that lost highway

                  I was just a lad, nearly 22
                  Neither good nor bad, just a kid like you
                  And now Im lost, too late to pray
                  Lord I take a cost, o the lost highway

                  Now boys dont start to ramblin round
                  On this road of sin are you sorrow bound
                  Take my advice or youll curse the day
                  You started rollin down that lost highway

                  bob dylan and hank williams
                  http://www.spin.com/features/news/2007/11/071116_williams_jackw/
                  http://www.pitchforkmedia.com/article/news/47167-jack-white-bob-dylan-rework-hank-williams-lyrics

                  http://www.rollingstone.com/reviews/album/11277554/review/11286830/moderntimes

                  Modern Times is something different. It's less terrifying, less
                  funny on first listen. But it has more command, more clarity.
                  There is none of the digital murk of Time Out of Mind, and the
                  snakebite live sound of Love and Theft has softened. This music
                  is relaxed; it has nothing to prove. It is music of accumulated
                  knowledge, it knows every move, anticipates every step before you
                  take it. Producing himself for the second time running, Dylan has
                  captured the sound of tradition as an ever-present, a sound he's
                  been working on since his first album, in 1962. (One reason
                  Modern Times is so good is that Dylan has been making it so
                  long.) These songs stand alongside their sources and are meant
                  to, which is why their sources are so obvious, so direct:
                  "Rollin' and Tumblin' " gives a cowboy gallop and new lyrics to
                  Muddy Waters' 1950 hit of the same name (with its own history
                  dating back to at least 1929); "Someday Baby" mellow-downs Slim
                  Harpo's "Shake Your Hips"; "The Levee's Gonna Break" jumps off
                  from Memphis Minnie's "When the Levee Breaks"; "Nettie Moore"
                  lifts a line from a nineteenth-century ballad recorded by the
                  Sons of the Pioneers; and Chuck Berry's "Johnny B. Goode"
                  motivates "Thunder on the Mountain."

                  Kinda confusing but I lost some of the links.

                  --
                  g
                • lisa
                  ... Quite the musician/performance. One of my distant cousins (my great aunt s daughter) used to live with Muddy Waters, believe it or not... ...
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 6, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, George Henry <gchenry@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > On Sat, 2 Feb 2008, lisa wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > > "Moss grows fat on a rolling stone." There are a few hypotheses on
                    > > this line, but one they didn't mention is Rolling Stone magazine and
                    > > how they made a lot of money on the magazine but the coverage they
                    > > gave wasn't necessarily to "the music" type of musicians but the ones
                    > > the big labels wanted to promote.
                    >
                    > The song 65.. I was still in the army.
                    > The mag 67.. after I was discharged.
                    >
                    > In the beginning Jan Wenner distanced himself from the hippie
                    > music of the times.
                    >
                    > You got me to thinking and I found the this on the Web.
                    >
                    > Rollin' Stone (1950)
                    > McKinley Morganfield AKA Muddy 'Mississippi' Waters
                    >
                    > Muddy Waters - Rollin' Stone aka Catfish Blues
                    > it was Muddy who added the rolling stone metaphor.
                    >
                    >
                    > Well, I wish I was a catfish,
                    > Swimmin in a oh, deep, blue sea.
                    > I would have all you good lookin women,
                    > Fishin, fishin after me.
                    > Sure 'nough, a-after me.
                    > Sure 'nough, a-after me.
                    > Oh 'nough, oh 'nough, sure 'nough.
                    >
                    > I went to my baby's house,
                    > And I sit down oh, on her steps.
                    > She said, "Now, come on in now, Muddy."
                    > "You know, my husband just now left."
                    > "Sure 'nough, he just now left."
                    > "Sure 'nough, he just now left."
                    > Sure 'nough, oh well, oh well.
                    >
                    > Well, my mother told my father,
                    > Just before hmmm, I was born,
                    > "I got a boy child's comin,"
                    > "He's gonna be, he's gonna be a rollin stone,"
                    > "Sure 'nough, he's a rollin stone,"
                    > "Sure 'nough, he's a rollin stone,"
                    > Oh well he's a, oh well he's a, oh well he's a.
                    >
                    > Well, I feel, yes I feel,
                    > Feel that I could lay down oh, time ain't long.
                    > I'm gonna catch the first thing smokin,
                    > Back, back down the road I'm goin.
                    > Back down the road I'm goin.
                    > Back down the road I'm goin.
                    > Sure 'nough back, sure 'nough back.
                    >
                    > Muddy Waters - Rollin' Stone aka Catfish Blues
                    > it was Muddy who added the rolling stone metaphor.
                    >
                    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaIT0mKJ7D0
                    > Newport

                    Quite the musician/performance. One of my distant cousins (my great
                    aunt's daughter) used to live with Muddy Waters, believe it or not...

                    >
                    > There is also a Hank Williams hit in 1949 on the "B" side of a
                    > 78.
                    >
                    > "Lost Highway"
                    >
                    >
                    > Im a rollin stone all alone and lost
                    > For a life of sin I have paid the cost
                    > When I pass by all the people say
                    > Just another guy on the lost highway
                    >
                    > Just a deck of cards and a jug of wine
                    > And a womans lies makes a life like mine
                    > O the day we met, I went astray
                    > I started rolling down that lost highway
                    >
                    > I was just a lad, nearly 22
                    > Neither good nor bad, just a kid like you
                    > And now Im lost, too late to pray
                    > Lord I take a cost, o the lost highway
                    >
                    > Now boys dont start to ramblin round
                    > On this road of sin are you sorrow bound
                    > Take my advice or youll curse the day
                    > You started rollin down that lost highway
                    >
                    > bob dylan and hank williams
                    > http://www.spin.com/features/news/2007/11/071116_williams_jackw/
                    >
                    http://www.pitchforkmedia.com/article/news/47167-jack-white-bob-dylan-rework-hank-williams-lyrics
                    >
                    >
                    http://www.rollingstone.com/reviews/album/11277554/review/11286830/moderntimes
                    >
                    > Modern Times is something different. It's less terrifying, less
                    > funny on first listen. But it has more command, more clarity.
                    > There is none of the digital murk of Time Out of Mind, and the
                    > snakebite live sound of Love and Theft has softened. This music
                    > is relaxed; it has nothing to prove. It is music of accumulated
                    > knowledge, it knows every move, anticipates every step before you
                    > take it. Producing himself for the second time running, Dylan has
                    > captured the sound of tradition as an ever-present, a sound he's
                    > been working on since his first album, in 1962. (One reason
                    > Modern Times is so good is that Dylan has been making it so
                    > long.) These songs stand alongside their sources and are meant
                    > to, which is why their sources are so obvious, so direct:
                    > "Rollin' and Tumblin' " gives a cowboy gallop and new lyrics to
                    > Muddy Waters' 1950 hit of the same name (with its own history
                    > dating back to at least 1929); "Someday Baby" mellow-downs Slim
                    > Harpo's "Shake Your Hips"; "The Levee's Gonna Break" jumps off
                    > from Memphis Minnie's "When the Levee Breaks"; "Nettie Moore"
                    > lifts a line from a nineteenth-century ballad recorded by the
                    > Sons of the Pioneers; and Chuck Berry's "Johnny B. Goode"
                    > motivates "Thunder on the Mountain."
                    >
                    > Kinda confusing but I lost some of the links.
                    >
                    > --
                    > g
                    >

                    Can't think of a better man to produce newfound Hank Williams stuff.
                    Jack White of the White Stripes has a soul-twanging minimalist way
                    about him so I see why Jimmy picked him to travel along.

                    Dylan truly is breaking new ground. Rock and rollers and folk
                    musicians either die before they get old or rest on their laurels.
                    He's moving beyond. It's been awhile since I picked up a new Dylan
                    CD. Something in the back of my mind is afraid if I listen and hear
                    the status quo (the way of...) it would hurt too much. Maybe it is
                    time to reconsider.

                    rgds,
                    --li
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.