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Review of Dynamic Tao and Its Manifestation

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  • Thomas Hood
    Dynamic Tao and Its Manifestation A Systematic Analysis of Tao Philosophy by Wayne L. Wang, Ph.D. This remarkable book is an extensive examination of the
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 3, 2006
      Dynamic Tao and Its Manifestation
      A Systematic Analysis of Tao Philosophy
      by Wayne L. Wang, Ph.D.

      This remarkable book is an extensive examination of the concepts of
      Wu and Yu in the Dao De Jing. Wu and Yu (transliterated as 'Yo', You3
      in Pinyin) may be translated as 'non-being' and 'being' (Wing-Tsit
      Chan) and together occur 149 times in the DDJ. They are fundamental
      to Eastern thought. Wu is the 'Mu' of Zen Buddhism.

      The book is divided into two parts. The first part is devoted to a
      discussion of the concepts of Wu and Yu with examples from modern
      physics. The second part is the complete Chinese Mawangdui DDJ of Gao
      Ming with an original verse-by-verse translation and footnotes. The
      book is worth buying just for this version of the DDJ.

      The author's comments and notes are often suggestive, insightful,
      original, and sometimes surprising. In only a few sentences in
      section 3.11 he gives an interpretation of the Tai Chi symbol in
      terms of dragon eyes and veins that I have never seen elsewhere but
      which is undoubtedly of long standing in Chinese culture. Occasional
      notes on how the composition of a Chinese character influences its
      interpretation are especially helpful.

      This book is suitable for persons of a thoughtful frame of mind who
      have some knowledge of Chinese characters and a serious interest in
      the Dao De Jing. I think myself fortunate to have a copy.

      The author supports his work at http://www.dynamictao.com/ . His
      approach to the Dao, mode of thought, and personal style may be
      sampled by visiting the website.

      Tom
    • lisa
      ... [...snip...] ... [...snip...] Reminds me of a fable about dotting the dragon s eyes: http://www.starfall.com/n/chinese-fables/draw-dragon/load.htm?f Isn t
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 5, 2006
        --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Hood" <pocossin@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dynamic Tao and Its Manifestation
        > A Systematic Analysis of Tao Philosophy
        > by Wayne L. Wang, Ph.D.
        >
        [...snip...]

        > The author's comments and notes are often suggestive, insightful,
        > original, and sometimes surprising. In only a few sentences in
        > section 3.11 he gives an interpretation of the Tai Chi symbol in
        > terms of dragon eyes and veins that I have never seen elsewhere but
        > which is undoubtedly of long standing in Chinese culture. Occasional
        > notes on how the composition of a Chinese character influences its
        > interpretation are especially helpful.

        [...snip...]

        Reminds me of a fable about dotting the dragon's eyes:

        http://www.starfall.com/n/chinese-fables/draw-dragon/load.htm?f

        Isn't there a famous gate in China with so many dragons on it, and the
        rest supposedly flew off when their eyes were dotted?

        rgds,
        lisa
      • Thomas Hood
        ... the ... Nice story: In China when someone does a good job, people say, Draw dragon, dot eyes. Maybe the moral is that if we re too explicit, we lose
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 7, 2006
          --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "lisa" <ms_jade_li@...> wrote:
          >>
          > Reminds me of a fable about dotting the dragon's eyes:
          >
          > http://www.starfall.com/n/chinese-fables/draw-dragon/load.htm?f
          >
          > Isn't there a famous gate in China with so many dragons on it, and
          the
          > rest supposedly flew off when their eyes were dotted?
          >
          > rgds,
          > lisa
          >


          Nice story: "In China when someone does a good job, people say, 'Draw
          dragon, dot eyes.'"

          Maybe the moral is that if we're too explicit, we lose our dragons.

          "...there is an eye of yin in yang, and an eye of yang in yin," says
          Wayne Wang. "They are the source of transmutation. Yin and yang are
          connected through these eyes via the 'dragon veins' in a higher
          dimension. Likewise, Wu and Yo [Yu] are connected in this fashion."

          I have never seen the Tai Chi symbol interpreted as a face and did
          not find such an interpretation on the Internet, although the gestalt
          is compelling and obvious once Wayne points it out.

          Wayne doesn't say so, but I would think the curved S line represents
          the dragon veins. Being curved, it would throw off evil spirits
          (especially numerous lately).

          Wayne associates the eyes with the wormholes of Quantum Cosmology.
          Also, the eyes could be the anima and animus of Jung. Myself, I
          associate the eyes with the portals between the world of appearances
          and the world of ideas.

          "Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each
          other's eyes for an instant?" (Walden).

          Tom
        • lisa
          ... One of my old buddies from the net (you know who you are) told me that a Chinese friend of his said something similar, in regards to writing style. If you
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 7, 2006
            --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Hood" <pocossin@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "lisa" <ms_jade_li@> wrote:
            > >>
            > > Reminds me of a fable about dotting the dragon's eyes:
            > >
            > > http://www.starfall.com/n/chinese-fables/draw-dragon/load.htm?f
            > >
            > > Isn't there a famous gate in China with so many dragons on it, and
            > the
            > > rest supposedly flew off when their eyes were dotted?
            > >
            > > rgds,
            > > lisa
            > >
            >
            >
            > Nice story: "In China when someone does a good job, people say, 'Draw
            > dragon, dot eyes.'"
            >
            > Maybe the moral is that if we're too explicit, we lose our dragons.

            One of my old buddies from the net (you know who you are) told me that
            a Chinese friend of his said something similar, in regards to writing
            style. If you leave nothing to the imagination, you will lose the reader.

            >
            > "...there is an eye of yin in yang, and an eye of yang in yin," says
            > Wayne Wang. "They are the source of transmutation. Yin and yang are
            > connected through these eyes via the 'dragon veins' in a higher
            > dimension. Likewise, Wu and Yo [Yu] are connected in this fashion."
            >
            > I have never seen the Tai Chi symbol interpreted as a face and did
            > not find such an interpretation on the Internet, although the gestalt
            > is compelling and obvious once Wayne points it out.
            >
            > Wayne doesn't say so, but I would think the curved S line represents
            > the dragon veins. Being curved, it would throw off evil spirits
            > (especially numerous lately).
            >
            > Wayne associates the eyes with the wormholes of Quantum Cosmology.
            > Also, the eyes could be the anima and animus of Jung. Myself, I
            > associate the eyes with the portals between the world of appearances
            > and the world of ideas.
            >
            > "Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each
            > other's eyes for an instant?" (Walden).
            >
            > Tom
            >

            "If you could see what I've seen with your eyes."
            --Roy Batty
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