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tommy D's Quote of the Day 4 1 03

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  • tommyD
    In engaging in warfare it is said: I dare not be the host but be the guest. I dare not advance an inch but retreat a foot. This is called to march without
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1, 2003
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      In engaging in warfare it is said:
      I dare not be the host but be the guest.
      I dare not advance an inch but retreat a foot.

      This is called to march without advanicng,
      To roll up one's sleeves wihtout baring one's arms,
      To throw a rope without an enemy,
      To carry without a weapon.

      Of all calamities,
      None is greater than underestimating one's enemy.
      In underestimating my enemy,
      I risk losing my treasure.

      Therefore when opposing armies are engaged in battle,
      The sorrowful party will win.

      TTC Ch. 69, Ellen Chen trans.
    • Ron
      Or, as I would put it (see subsequent discussion): There¹s an old military saying: ³I¹d rather face an attack than have to make one. I¹d rather retreat a
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 1, 2003
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        Or, as I would put it (see subsequent discussion):

        There¹s an old military saying:
        ³I¹d rather face an attack than have to make one.
        I¹d rather retreat a foot than try to advance an inch.²

        That¹s the secret to moving forward while staying put,
        preparing for battle without revealing your strength.
        When you defend yourself without any show of force,
        you give your opponent nothing to fight.

        Attacking an enemy you¹ve underestimated is a costly mistake.
        When two forces oppose each other,
        the winner is the one who¹s most reluctant to fight.


        on 4/1/03 5:57 AM, tommyD at tomd@... wrote:

        > In engaging in warfare it is said:
        > I dare not be the host but be the guest.
        > I dare not advance an inch but retreat a foot.
        >
        > This is called to march without advanicng,
        > To roll up one's sleeves wihtout baring one's arms,
        > To throw a rope without an enemy,
        > To carry without a weapon.
        >
        > Of all calamities,
        > None is greater than underestimating one's enemy.
        > In underestimating my enemy,
        > I risk losing my treasure.
        >
        > Therefore when opposing armies are engaged in battle,
        > The sorrowful party will win.
        >
        > TTC Ch. 69, Ellen Chen trans.
      • lisa
        ... Commentary from Ames & Hall: [T]he army that enters the battle with remorse is the one that has the deeper understanding of the relationship between
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 5, 2003
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          --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, tommyD <tomd@p...> wrote:
          > In engaging in warfare it is said:
          > I dare not be the host but be the guest.
          > I dare not advance an inch but retreat a foot.
          >
          > This is called to march without advanicng,
          > To roll up one's sleeves wihtout baring one's arms,
          > To throw a rope without an enemy,
          > To carry without a weapon.
          >
          > Of all calamities,
          > None is greater than underestimating one's enemy.
          > In underestimating my enemy,
          > I risk losing my treasure.
          >
          > Therefore when opposing armies are engaged in battle,
          > The sorrowful party will win.
          >
          > TTC Ch. 69, Ellen Chen trans.

          Commentary from Ames & Hall:
          "[T]he army that enters the battle with remorse is the one that has
          the deeper understanding of the relationship between itself and its
          enemy, and altough it would not be deploying on the battlefield
          unless all other options had been exhausted, it still treats the
          relationship with this enemy with abiding respect."

          In the case of the current conflicts, had we really exhausted all
          other options? Some would say yes and others would say no. Again it
          comes back to arbitrarily drawn lines and perspectives. From what I
          can see of the U.S./U.K. none of this has been taken lightly.
          Although we despise the human rights abuses by Hussein, I do not
          think we destroy the "enemy" with anything less than respect.

          Of course, as always, opposing and/or alternative points of view are
          encouraged. No matter how little this business has mattered to me in
          the past, it is hard to ignore now, and talking about it helps me.

          rgds,
          lisa
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