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a daoist rule

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  • Sarah Vanni <smvanni@yahoo.com>
    If we had the opportunity to get a person practicing Daoist Philosophy to run for the Presidency of the United States: Who might that be? How would that person
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 7, 2003
      If we had the opportunity to get a person practicing Daoist Philosophy
      to run for the Presidency of the United States:

      Who might that be?

      How would that person rule?

      What would be the changes to be made?

      Would the American people accept this?

      Wouldn't it be great if the United States converted to Daoism instead
      of Capitalism?

      Do you think that would bring the world back to peace?

      Do you think it would be possible?



      I am writing a paper about this for my Eastern Philosophy class.

      Please reply with any of your thoughts.

      Be Well,
      ~sera
    • Patrick Burrows
      ... a daoist. ... Read the TTC. It is mostly things like the wise ruler eats his bread with his left hand while the right hand spreads the jam. That will
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 7, 2003
        >If we had the opportunity to get a person practicing Daoist Philosophy
        >to run for the Presidency of the United States:
        >
        >Who might that be?


        a daoist.



        >What would be the changes to be made?

        Read the TTC. It is mostly things like "the wise ruler eats his bread with
        his left hand while the right hand spreads the jam." That will give you a
        good idea of the changes to be made.



        >Would the American people accept this?


        Some would. Some wouldn't. Just like all things.


        >Wouldn't it be great if the United States converted to Daoism instead
        >of Capitalism?


        I didn't realze daoism was an economic system. Isn't the history of daoism
        mostly feudal? The TTC certainly seems to envision a singular ruler (maybe
        as part of a large beuracracy). Do I think feudalism is better than
        democracy? Not by a long shot.

        As for a daoist economic system... that just seems absurd to me. That seems
        more a confucian thing, to me.


        >Do you think that would bring the world back to peace?
        >
        >Do you think it would be possible?


        *Back* to peace? Were we ever there?

        Or do you mean back to wu chi? Cause, if that, that seems ike a very
        American-centric viewpoint. We are not the center of the universe and a
        daoist president will have no affect on the universe at large.

        Besides, world peace is not a goal of daoism. Violence is a part of our
        nature, and no self-respecting daoist would want to suppress that. Daoism
        sees the world as constant change from one state to another. From yin to
        yang to yin and all the wonderful gray points in between. There is a whole
        book about these changes. It is called, creatively enough, _The Book of
        Changes_ or _I Ching._ Some of the changes in the world are violent.

        All changes are an example of conflict and harmony. Some have more than
        others.
      • Deb Woodell <dcwoodell@yahoo.com>
        Wow, great questions! I m usually an optimist about life, but the cynic in me says it s unlikely to happen in this day and age, under the current money machine
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 7, 2003
          Wow, great questions! I'm usually an optimist about life, but the
          cynic in me says it's unlikely to happen in this day and age, under
          the current money machine of a system. I think it would take a major
          paradigm shift for a Daoist person to have a shot at even running for
          president, let alone win the race. I think the closest we've gotten
          to it in my lifetime is either Jimmy Carter, who has set the bar for
          ex-presidents extremely high (and makes me proud, even if belatedly,
          of the first presidential vote I cast), or Jerry Brown.
          Ideally, I think it would be benefit the country to have someone
          like that in office, and I do think that person would be more
          inclined to peace than the current regime (and I do mean regime).
          However, given this country's system of checks and balances, unless
          that person's political party were the majority party, I wonder
          whether the president could accomplish much. If that person governed,
          I think she or he would govern lightly, as according to the TTC.
          However, I also am not inclined to think many Daoists would want to
          run for the highest office in the land.
          As for "converting" from capitalism to Daoism, that's an interesting
          idea, but I have to thank capitalism for many benefits in my life.
          Converting from gross consumerism and materialism to Daoism might be
          a better alternative. (As a for-instance, how many high school kids
          do you know who NEED a $50,000 Hummer?)
          Good luck with your school paper!
          Deb
          Berlin, NJ


          --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "Sarah Vanni <smvanni@y...>"
          <smvanni@y...> wrote:
          > If we had the opportunity to get a person practicing Daoist
          Philosophy
          > to run for the Presidency of the United States:
          >
          > Who might that be?
          >
          > How would that person rule?
          >
          > What would be the changes to be made?
          >
          > Would the American people accept this?
          >
          > Wouldn't it be great if the United States converted to Daoism
          instead
          > of Capitalism?
          >
          > Do you think that would bring the world back to peace?
          >
          > Do you think it would be possible?
          >
          >
          >
          > I am writing a paper about this for my Eastern Philosophy class.
          >
          > Please reply with any of your thoughts.
          >
          > Be Well,
          > ~sera
        • Ron
          In my lifetime does constrict things a little bit -- I would have picked Herbert Hoover, who gets a bad rap for having the misfortune to be in office when
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 7, 2003
            "In my lifetime" does constrict things a little bit -- I would have picked
            Herbert Hoover, who gets a bad rap for having the misfortune to be in office
            when the world economy imploded, but was in most other respects an excellent
            president... and, before that, a relentless humanitarian and relief
            organizer. And, not coincidentally, I think, a member of the Quaker faith...

            Deb Woodell <dcwoodell@...> at dcwoodell@... wrote:

            > I think it would take a major
            > paradigm shift for a Daoist person to have a shot at even running for
            > president, let alone win the race. I think the closest we've gotten
            > to it in my lifetime is either Jimmy Carter, who has set the bar for
            > ex-presidents extremely high (and makes me proud, even if belatedly,
            > of the first presidential vote I cast), or Jerry Brown.
          • Ron
            Very interesting questions, though akin to what someone mentioned before, I wouldn t suggest that capitalism and Daoism are such opposites. Materialism does
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 7, 2003
              Very interesting questions, though akin to what someone mentioned before, I
              wouldn't suggest that capitalism and Daoism are such opposites. Materialism
              does not necessarily equal capitalism, after all.

              I'd also concur that Daoism does not always entail non-violence. Though
              non-violence is an ideal, Chapter 31 of the Tao Te Ching tells us:

              The Master, knowing that all things came from Tao,
              recognizes what he has in common with his enemies.
              But when there is no other choice, he uses force reluctantly.
              He does so with great restraint,
              and never celebrates a victory;
              to do so would be to rejoice in killing.

              I suspect that we may very well be in a situation that will require the
              reluctant use of force; my concern is that the "reluctant" aspect will be
              forgotten in favor of more palatable jingoism.
            • Wolfgang I Waas
              Hi Sera, I ve just written to a friend, and there a similar question popped up. I wrote: Power is a most corroding agent; it eats away conscience rapidly,
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 8, 2003
                Hi Sera,

                I've just written to a friend, and there a similar question popped up.

                I wrote:
                Power is a most corroding agent; it eats away conscience rapidly, quicker than
                sulfuric acid...

                Taoism isn't a cooking recipe applicable 1 : 1 where one wants to, I'd think.,
                and even a Taoist President ain't no messiah ;)

                Ho-chang ()
                Wolfgang
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