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6446Re: 8th Anniversary of Cook Ding's Kitchen!

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  • oneof10k2
    Jul 7, 2013
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      proud of you and humbled at the same time, Rick.

      ::bowing::

      --li

      --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, "Rick M" <rickmatz@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > I mentioned this in Cook Ding's Kitchen 8th Anniversary Post
      > <http://cookdingskitchen.blogspot.com/2013/06/8th-anniversary-of-cook-di\
      > ngs-kitchen.html> . I have added a new item to the carryout menu, the
      > second eBook from Cook Ding's Kitchen.
      >
      > The book is titled, "The Phoenix Tastes a Lot Like Chicken." It is about
      > the Yin aspects of our training.
      >
      > The Yang aspects, the forms and drills, repetitions and hours we put in
      > are easy to grasp. The subtle unseen aspects of our training are just as
      > important and my go unnoticed. I thought it was time to give them their
      > due.
      >
      > The Phoenix Tastes a Lot Like Chicken is available on Amazon for the
      > Kindle.
      > <http://www.amazon.com/Phoenix-Tastes-Like-Chicken-ebook/dp/B00DSOJWDG/r\
      > ef=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373080575&sr=8-1&keywords=The+Phoenix+Tastes+a+Lo\
      > t+Like+Chicken>
      >
      > If you don't have a Kindle, you can download the free Kindle reading app
      > here <http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771> .
      >
      >
      > Below is a chapter from the book, on the value of being on the receiving
      > end of technique practice. Enjoy.
      >
      > Falling Down <http://www.blogger.com/null>
      >
      > ‘Tis Better to Receive Than to Give.
      >
      >
      > [http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-zkZGCySZ5OY/UdbSX6beWmI/AAAAAAAADLg/rvAzNQyUx\
      > TI/s320/shioda+aikido.jpg]
      > <http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-zkZGCySZ5OY/UdbSX6beWmI/AAAAAAAADLg/rvAzNQyUx\
      > TI/s1600/shioda+aikido.jpg>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > When we watch an aikido demonstration, what catches our attention the
      > most is the performance of the Shite (sh-tay), the “doer”
      > (aka Tori (tor-ree), “controller”; Nage (nah-gay)
      > “thrower” or whatever term your school uses). We pay less
      > attention to the Uke (oo-kay) the “receiver” unless he
      > performs some spectacular break fall. We tend not to give the role of
      > Uke much thought.
      >
      > In the style of aikido <http://www.aikidoyoshokai.org/> I trained in
      > when I was a young man, we practiced our aikido with a
      > “compliant” uke as opposed to one who
      > “resisted.” Different schools have differing philosophies
      > on training and the use of a compliant uke was our way of doing the
      > techniques for both parties in our budo practice.
      >
      > When we practice in class, we would take turns playing the role of Shite
      > and Uke. We patiently grind through doing our service as the Uke so that
      > we can once again take the seemingly more interesting role of Shite
      > where we think we’ll develop our “real” aikido
      > skills.
      >
      > The role of Shite is the Yang aspect of learning aikido, and volumes
      > have been written on how to perform countless techniques. It’s
      > high time we discussed the role of Uke and how that half of our budo
      > practice contributes to the whole.
      >
      > The Yin aspect of learning aikido is developed by taking the role of
      > Uke. As the Uke, you develop all the fundamental characteristics that
      > are necessary to become a credible Shite.
      >
      > Just as the Shite measures the distance/relationship between himself and
      > Uke prior to execution of the technique, so must the Uke. The term used
      > is “ma-ai” which means interval. In the simplest terms,
      > this means the distance between the Shite and Uke. To go a little
      > deeper, this is more than just the physical distance between the two
      > participants in the technique, but also denotes a relationship between
      > them.
      >
      > From the Shites’ perspective, there is an ideal distance between
      > himself and Uke where the latter is too far away to attack him as is,
      > and must move towards Shite in order to make the attack. Shite reveals
      > an opening enticing Uke to attack. By having moved, the Uke leaves an
      > opening for Shite and is now so close that whatever Shite does in
      > response to that attack, Uke has little time to adjust.
      >
      > Standing on Uke’s side of the interval, we see that he wants to
      > be close enough to do the one thing that will make an aikido technique
      > “work;” to make this repetition right here, now, a
      > learning experience worthy of the two participants: a sincere and
      > committed attack. Anything less and this whole practice of an aikido
      > technique becomes an empty dance where both parties have largely wasted
      > their time.
      >
      > A sincere and committed attack doesn’t mean however, that the Uke
      > is about to try annihilate the Shite. If you are the Uke in a
      > demonstration with a Master, you have got to give it all you have; but
      > in a class setting with a peer or a junior, your attack must not only be
      > sincere and committed, but appropriate for the type of practice you are
      > undertaking and the relative skill of Shite. Uke must give Shite a
      > sincere attack that he can handle. This develops sensitivity and
      > discernment.
      >
      > Sincerity, commitment, discernment and sensitivity; now what? What
      > comes next is perhaps the most difficult thing asked of anyone studying
      > a martial art. Most fail in their ability to do this to any great
      > extent. The Uke must set aside his ego and fully submit to
      > Shites’ response to the attack. The Uke must empty his cup.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ysCVBZMDAjI/UdbSlTzSS-I/AAAAAAAADLo/JxtebGnJh\
      > hI/s320/Japanese+tea+setting.jpg]
      > <http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ysCVBZMDAjI/UdbSlTzSS-I/AAAAAAAADLo/JxtebGnJh\
      > hI/s1600/Japanese+tea+setting.jpg>
      >
      > A Cup of Tea <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/101_Zen_Stories>
      >
      > Nan-in, a Japanese master during the Meiji era
      > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meiji_era> (1868-1912), received a
      > university professor who came to inquire about Zen.
      >
      > Nan-in served tea. He poured his visitor's cup full, and then kept on
      > pouring.
      >
      > The professor watched the overflow until he no longer could restrain
      > himself. "It is overfull. No more will go in!"
      >
      > "Like this cup," Nan-in said, "you are full of your own opinions and
      > speculations. How can I show you Zen unless you first empty your cup?"
      >
      > To empty one’s cup is probably the first real test in
      > anyone’s martial arts training. It can take many forms: following
      > Shite, setting aside any previous knowledge when joining a dojo to train
      > the way the current instructor says, or any number of things which
      > requires that you set your own ego aside.
      >
      > If you can’t pass this first test, you probably won’t
      > accomplish much else in your training either.
      >
      > Wherever Shite leads, Uke sticks, follows and yields. Whatever changes
      > the Shite presents to Uke, he adapts and continues. Uke can’t do
      > just anything “he wants” either. What “he
      > wants” doesn’t matter in the performance of the technique.
      > If he gives up his ego, Uke doesn’t “want” anything
      > other than to flow appropriately with the rest of the technique and be
      > in harmony with Shite, who is leading the way.
      >
      > Uke must empty himself to respond quickly and appropriately to Shite.
      > This is the very characteristic that one who is playing the role of
      > Shite requires the ability to respond to any attack from any direction
      > and number of opponents. The role of Uke is the most immediate training
      > ground for cultivating this type of mind because he must do it again and
      > again in real time. Trying to think and anticipate will only open the
      > door to falling behind. The only way to keep time is cultivate a calm,
      > clear mind; to be like the proverbial water reflecting the moon with
      > “no gap.”
      >
      > The harmony between Shite and Uke is where aikido happens; where Budo is
      > practiced. The Yin Yang symbol is complete.
      >
      > We sometimes hear that “Master X was uchideshi (inside student)
      > to Master Y for n years.” The uchideshi is a special student, an
      > inside student. The uchideshi is typically a live-in student so that he
      > may observe the master throughout the day and absorb lessons from his
      > daily life. The uchideshi is the master’s personal grunt in order
      > to knock down the ego a bit. Most importantly, the uchideshi serves as
      > the master’s personal uke during this period of his training.
      >
      > Teaching and learning an internal martial art is an intensely personal
      > matter and as you can see the “correct transmission” is
      > literally handed off by touch as one candle is used to light another.
      >
      > Uke and Shite. Yin and Yang. The practice of Budo. In our daily lives,
      > by learning to stick follow and adapt, to be a good Uke; we develop the
      > qualities that allow us to take positive action like a good Shite when
      > the opportunity is ripe.
      >
      > The combination of the skill and understanding of both roles, Shite and
      > Uke helps to make us complete.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com, Lisa K wrote:
      > >
      > > cool. didn't know you could queue things there
      > >
      > > To: TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com
      > > From: rickmatz@
      > > Date: Fri, 28 Jun 2013 12:09:02 -0700
      > > Subject: Re: [TaoTalk] 8th Anniversary of Cook Ding's Kitchen!
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      > > Ha!
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      > > I just keep posting stuff. I have months' worth of post queued up at
      > Cook Ding's Kitchen. I could get hit by a meteor and it would take some
      > time for anyone to catch on.
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Lisa K ms_jade_li@
      > > To: "TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com" taotalk@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Friday, June 28, 2013 3:02 PM
      > > Subject: RE: [TaoTalk] 8th Anniversary of Cook Ding's
      > > Kitchen!
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      > > We use the description incorrigible in MI Status codes when a juvenile
      > just won't follow the rules of the parents, the schools, curfew, etc.
      > It's funny how many parents, kids, staff pronounce it encourageable.
      > How do you see yourself as incorrigible, Cook Ding?
      > >
      > > rgds,
      > > --li
      > >
      > > To: TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com
      > > From: rickmatz@
      > > Date: Wed, 26 Jun 2013 07:02:03 -0700
      > > Subject: Re: [TaoTalk] 8th Anniversary of Cook Ding's Kitchen!
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      > > Thanks. I'm just both stubborn and incorrigible.
      > >
      > >
      > > From: P Burrows pburrows@
      > > To: TaoTalk@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 9:56 AM
      > > Subject: Re: [TaoTalk] 8th Anniversary of Cook Ding's Kitchen!
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      > > Good going, Rick. It takes a lot of dedication to consistently create
      > content for that period of time. I am always so hit or miss in my
      > aborted blogging attempts.
      > >
      > > --
      > > with excessive obsequiousness,
      > >
      > > Patrick Burrows
      > > http://www.BurrowsCorp.com
      > >
      > >
      > > On Tue, Jun 25, 2013 at 8:31 PM, Rick M rickmatz@ wrote:
      > >
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      > > Today is the 8th anniversary of my blog, Cook Ding's Kitchen !
      > >
      > > Best Regards,
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Rick
      > >
      >
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