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storm duo c&c welcome

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  • Trish Shields
    wind-scattered cherry blossoms curl in the ditch her diet plans askew after New Year s my daughter watches trees bend during the storm monstrous limbs scratch
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 1, 2008
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      wind-scattered
      cherry blossoms curl
      in the ditch
      her diet plans askew
      after New Year's


      my daughter
      watches trees bend
      during the storm
      monstrous limbs scratch
      her pane until dawn


      Trish
    • Ella W.
      I understand the comparison in the first one.  The second one nicely reminds me of the boo-man when I was a kid.  In The Phil., coconut trees look very
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 2, 2008
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        I understand the comparison in the first one.  The second one nicely reminds me of the 'boo-man' when I was a kid.  In The Phil., coconut trees look very agile in a storm, their tops looking like Medusa heads shaking to and fro, like wild women losing their minds or something ...
        :>) Ella

        --- On Fri, 1/8/08, Trish Shields trishardent@...






        wind-scattered
        cherry blossoms curl
        in the ditch
        her diet plans askew
        after New Year's

        my daughter
        watches trees bend
        during the storm
        monstrous limbs scratch
        her pane until dawn

        Trish
        .















        __________________________________________________________
        Not happy with your email address?.
        Get the one you really want - millions of new email addresses available now at Yahoo! http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/ymail/new.html

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Trish Shields
        Thanks, Ella. I spent last weekend pruning the tree back. Nightmares are just as bad at 14 as they are at 10, perhaps especially so. Trish
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 2, 2008
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          Thanks, Ella. I spent last weekend pruning the tree back. Nightmares
          are just as bad at 14 as they are at 10, perhaps especially so.

          Trish

          On 2-Aug-08, at 10:38 AM, Ella W. wrote:

          > I understand the comparison in the first one. The second one nicely
          > reminds me of the 'boo-man' when I was a kid. In The Phil., coconut
          > trees look very agile in a storm, their tops looking like Medusa
          > heads shaking to and fro, like wild women losing their minds or
          > something ...
          > :>) Ella
          >
          > --- On Fri, 1/8/08, Trish Shields trishardent@...
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > wind-scattered
          > cherry blossoms curl
          > in the ditch
          > her diet plans askew
          > after New Year's
          >
          > my daughter
          > watches trees bend
          > during the storm
          > monstrous limbs scratch
          > her pane until dawn
          >
          > Trish
          > .
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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          >
          > __________________________________________________________
          > Not happy with your email address?.
          > Get the one you really want - millions of new email addresses
          > available now at Yahoo! http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/ymail/new.html
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          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
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          >
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        • Catdanzing@aol.com
          Trish, Nightmares are as bad at 60+. We have to learn how to deal with them. Have you tried grounding exercises with her? It is simple but effective. I
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 2, 2008
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            Trish,

            Nightmares are as bad at 60+. We have to learn how to deal with them.
            Have you tried grounding exercises with her? It is simple but effective. I
            use it with my worst nightmares to this day.

            It's simple as can be. You sit up and look around with the lights on and
            say This is my room. And start naming all the things you see. That is my bed.
            That is my red dress. This is my TV, radio, green hat,....... Then get up
            and have a bowl of pleasant but unexciting food. My own personal choice is
            corn flakes because there is nothing exciting about cornflakes and they seem
            to symbolize simplicity and calmness. That has to be a personal choice of
            the person who has nightmares. It needs to be something simple that they like
            but not like enough to get stirred up about. Pizza would not do, for
            example. Reading a slightly dull calm book, especially one you have read before
            and selected for that purpose, while you eat your cornflakes is another help.

            And that's all there is to it. It's called grounding because you are
            connecting yourself to the ground, to the here and now of the real world.

            Do NOT do grounding if you are not actually safe. I made that mistake once.
            I have a fire phobia and tried grounding one day - but I was in a gas
            station and it was a big mistake. Does not help to ground yourself to dangerous
            ground when you are trying for calm. LOL





            norla









            In a message dated 8/2/2008 4:18:27 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
            trishardent@... writes:

            Thanks, Ella. I spent last weekend pruning the tree back. Nightmares
            are just as bad at 14 as they are at 10, perhaps especially so.

            Trish

            On 2-Aug-08, at 10:38 AM, Ella W. wrote:

            > I understand the comparison in the first one. The second one nicely
            > reminds me of the 'boo-man' when I was a kid. In The Phil., coconut
            > trees look very agile in a storm, their tops looking like Medusa
            > heads shaking to and fro, like wild women losing their minds or
            > something ...
            > :>) Ella
            >
            > --- On Fri, 1/8/08, Trish Shields trishardent@...
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > wind-scattered
            > cherry blossoms curl
            > in the ditch
            > her diet plans askew
            > after New Year's
            >
            > my daughter
            > watches trees bend
            > during the storm
            > monstrous limbs scratch
            > her pane until dawn
            >
            > Trish
            > .
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > __________________________________________________________
            > Not happy with your email address?.
            > Get the one you really want - millions of new email addresses
            > available now at Yahoo! http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/ymail/new.html
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >


            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links








            **************Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in your budget?
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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ella W.
            Nightmares are bad anytime.  I ve read Norla s piece on grounding and it sounds like a good idea.  I think it might also also be good to talk about the
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 3, 2008
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              Nightmares are bad anytime.  I've read Norla's piece on grounding and it sounds like a good idea.  I think it might also also be good to talk about the nightmare later, after the person has gone back to sleep and had a night's rest and woken up again.  A therapist would usually ask where the person thinks the nightmare came from.  That is an expensive option, so you can ask your daughter yourself.  Important thing is to let her know that she's not alone.  This may at least reduce the chances of it happening again.  I hope she watched you when you pruned the tree.
               
              Ella







               Thanks, Ella. I spent last weekend pruning the tree back. Nightmares
               are just as bad at 14 as they are at 10, perhaps especially so.

               Trish


               I understand the comparison in the first one. The second one nicely reminds me of the 'boo-man' when I was a kid. In The Phil., coconut  trees look very agile in a storm, their tops looking like Medusa heads shaking to and fro, like wild women losing their minds or  something ...
               :>) Ella


               wind-scattered
               cherry blossoms curl
               in the ditch
               her diet plans askew
               after New Year's

               my daughter
               watches trees bend
               during the storm
               monstrous limbs scratch
               her pane until dawn

               Trish
              .















              __________________________________________________________
              Not happy with your email address?.
              Get the one you really want - millions of new email addresses available now at Yahoo! http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/ymail/new.html

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Catdanzing@aol.com
              Another thing that helps is called Senoy [sp?] dream work. It s a tribal group. When a child has a troublesome dream the parent talks to them about it and
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 3, 2008
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                Another thing that helps is called Senoy [sp?] dream work. It's a tribal
                group. When a child has a troublesome dream the parent talks to them about it
                and they work out how it could have gone better in the dream. As in, if the
                monsters came to your room, what could we all do to make things come out
                better? The kid leads the way in creating the solution to the problem in the
                waking world - using any imaginary thing they like. "We could hit them with a
                chair and call the cops." For example, a child might say. Or "We could tell
                gramma and she could pray to God" Anything that the kid suggests that ends
                up with them winning in the dream is okay whether it makes sense or not. The
                point is to get the child to go back into their dream as their own hero.
                Then the child goes to bed and deliberately goes back into the dream [even if
                they don't sleep] and sees that solution fixing things and everything coming
                out alright.

                If the kid finds that every imaginary trick they use ends up turning out bad
                and the monsters get a bigger chair or eat the cops and gramma - then
                professional help may be indicated. That suggests an extremely high level of
                stress.

                I find that Sennoy dream work ends up giving the dreamer a power over their
                dreams in a sense of self-empowerment that extends beyond dreams and sleep.
                But it is rarely needed beyond one or two times and then the kid will start
                self solving - coming to you and telling you how they became the hero of
                their own story last night and flew down in a superwoman cape and sent the
                monsters packing. Or fed the monsters cookies and sent them back to sleep or made
                friends with the monsters who are now life long but sweet companions and
                protectors. My own monster under the bed is very good at eating intruding bad
                men and stomping out fires. As an adult, my monster under the bed is a cartoon
                figure and a joke - I like laughter as a response to fear but when I used
                that technique with clients and with my own son and granddaughter they found it
                worked well.



                with a rumbling laugh
                the monster under the bed
                turns another page
                read me a bedtime story
                sing me back to sleep again



                hmm....needs work


                norla




                In a message dated 8/3/2008 12:09:17 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                ellawagemakers@... writes:

                Nightmares are bad anytime. I've read Norla's piece on grounding and it
                sounds like a good idea. I think it might also also be good to talk about the
                nightmare later, after the person has gone back to sleep and had a night's
                rest and woken up again. A therapist would usually ask where the person thinks
                the nightmare came from. That is an expensive option, so you can ask your
                daughter yourself. Important thing is to let her know that she's not alone.
                This may at least reduce the chances of it happening again. I hope she
                watched you when you pruned the tree.

                Ella







                Thanks, Ella. I spent last weekend pruning the tree back. Nightmares
                are just as bad at 14 as they are at 10, perhaps especially so.

                Trish


                I understand the comparison in the first one. The second one nicely reminds
                me of the 'boo-man' when I was a kid. In The Phil., coconut trees look very
                agile in a storm, their tops looking like Medusa heads shaking to and fro,
                like wild women losing their minds or something ...
                :>) Ella


                wind-scattered
                cherry blossoms curl
                in the ditch
                her diet plans askew
                after New Year's

                my daughter
                watches trees bend
                during the storm
                monstrous limbs scratch
                her pane until dawn

                Trish
                .















                __________________________________________________________
                Not happy with your email address?.
                Get the one you really want - millions of new email addresses available now
                at Yahoo! http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/ymail/new.html

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                ------------------------------------

                Yahoo! Groups Links







                **************Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in your budget?
                Read reviews on AOL Autos.
                (http://autos.aol.com/cars-BMW-128-2008/expert-review?ncid=aolaut00050000000017 )


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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