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Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Article about Hoods Texans

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  • NJ Rebel
    Group; If you have a Preview option on your email program, I recommend you use it. It will allow you to see what attachments are attached before you open the
    Message 1 of 27 , Apr 28, 2002
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      Group;

      If you have a Preview option on your email program, I recommend
      you use it. It will allow you to see what attachments are
      attached before you open the email! If you see anything ending
      with .pif or .bat as an attachment or .exe, DELETE it
      immediately! (Many viruses come with either of the three
      extensions.)

      Also, run Trend Micro Antivirus web based scanning, Norton Anti
      Virus or any similar program to locate any virus infections you
      might have and then clean.

      The KLEZ-G variant worm virus has been running amuck in this
      group, and already caused one member to have his account delisted
      by the moderator.

      Your humble servant,
      Gerry Mayers
      Co. B, "Tom Green Rifles",
      Fourth Regiment, Texas Volunteer Infantry

      A Proud American by Birth, Southern by Choice!

      "I know of no fitter resting-place for a soldier than the field
      on which he has nobly laid down his life." --General Robert
      Edward Lee


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <oliverg25@...>
      To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, August 27, 2001 8:18 PM
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Article about Hoods Texans


      > --- In TalkAntietam@y..., TR Livesey <westwood@e...> wrote:
      > > David,
      > >
      > > > Corn planting patterns were different in 1862, not nearly
      as
      > > dense, with rows being wide enough for a horse to move
      between.
      > > This would imply that the corn will have different degrees of
      > > concealment,
      >
      > Not So!
      > Once the corn is planted a horse never goes into the field.
      Plowing
      > and planting is usually done with a team of horses, not one.
      after
      > planting there is no need for a horse to go back into the
      field. Also
      > a horse does not damage the top soil as much as a tractor wheel
      >
      > Amish farmers in PA still use horses and mules and their rows
      are
      > tighter than those of farmers using tractors. Their fields are
      so
      > tight you can not look down a row.
      >
      > This might come through twice when Hotmail gets its act
      together.
      >
      > O.G.
      >
      >
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      >
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      Service.
      >
      >
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