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Re: [TalkAntietam] 49th letters

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  • MikeL49NYVI@aol.com
    Have you (or anyone else here) ever seen the poem When the Boys In Blue Are Gone by John Hendricks? He was a veteran of the 89th Indiana. It was given to me
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 9, 2012
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      Have you (or anyone else here) ever seen the poem "When the Boys In Blue
      Are Gone" by John Hendricks? He was a veteran of the 89th Indiana.
      It was given to me just before a reenactment in Kentucky, in 1993-1994 and
      I have carried it with me ever since.
      I have also read it to the men at several events, and publicly at different
      dedications and ceremonies.
      There is not way to improve upon the sentiments of that poem, and to
      better illustrate what their soldier life, and experiences meant to them.

      It is not overly long and I can reproduce it here it desired.

      We are going to take part in the "Aftermath of Battle" weekend on the 13th
      and 14th of October. It is our first time working as the 49th NY with the
      NPS, so we hope it will come off OK.

      I will be very easy to find down there, a friend is bringing some horses,
      and we have permission to ride them. So being mounted, I will be a field
      level officer, depending on what shoulder straps I have on at that time. Most
      likely Colonel.

      More fun stuff- On a 2nd reading of the letters I caught something I
      missed the first time. In his letter dated 20 Feb. 1905 Col. Alberger wrote
      that after he got the regiment into their final position he was approached
      by Adjutant General Long
      "with the compliments of General Smith (in a flask)"
      He remembered that flask 43 years later.

      Mike L





      In a message dated 6/8/2012 8:22:05 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      tgclemens@... writes:

      One of the things i learned reading the letters; Carman and board
      originally wrote text for a tablet describing Baldy Smith's division being
      "checked" in their advance. Smith, and eventually Franklin, vociferously objected,
      wrote several letters arguing the point and even visted the field, along
      with Hyde of the 7th ME. Carman relented because Smith insisted his orders
      were only to advance that far, and there was no intended attack. After 30+
      year it still made a huge difference to him to say his division was not
      "checked.!" Fun stuff.

      Which weekend in October?

      ________________________________
      From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com] on
      behalf of MikeL49NYVI@... [MikeL49NYVI@...]
      Sent: Friday, June 08, 2012 4:49 PM
      To: talkantietam@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [TalkAntietam] 49th letters



      Tom:

      The 49th NY letters came today, thank you once again.
      I dove right into them.

      Lt Colonel Alberger clearly was a well educated man, and had great
      penmanship. I only had trouble with 2-3 words in all the letters. We can
      now
      pinpoint the movements of the 49th at Gettysburg, Cedar Creek,
      Spotsylvaina,
      and Antietam.

      The letters did answer one of my questions about their advance. Their
      brigade was only to go as far as the "small hill" near the Dunker Church
      and
      wait for the rest of the division. He mentions having to hold the 49th
      back,
      as they wanted to go farther on.
      I had always wondered why they stopped with the CSA line so thin right
      there.
      It appears to me that they were sent in to guard and support the flank of
      French's Division from another push such as Cooke had just made with his
      two NC regiments.
      If you or anyone else on this forum has more information on this I'd love
      to hear it.
      We will be doing a Living History Field Hospital on the Mumma farm in
      October, and I am going to take the 49th where they marched and fought.

      Too bad Lt. Col. Alberger didn't relay the details of the "few words" he
      exchanged with Gen. Hancock as they passed by his brigade. That could have
      been interestingly insightful concerning both men, about to go into a
      desperate battle as they were. I'll wager that Hancock expected to be
      ordered to
      follow Irwin's brigade at any moment.

      Another one of those "what-if's"

      Thanks again
      Mike Lavis

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      ------------------------------------


      Yahoo! Groups Links






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Thomas G. Clemens
      Mike, No, I don t think I ve seen it, and would like a copy. Also, as a favor, if you or someone, transcribe those 49th letters I d like copies. I sometimes
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 10, 2012
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        Mike,
        No, I don't think I've seen it, and would like a copy. Also, as a favor, if you or someone, transcribe those 49th letters I'd like copies. I sometimes post letters on my blog, and it is always easier to read typescripts when I am looking for something. I'll check my calendar, and if nothing conflicts that weekend I'll stop by.
        Tom
        ________________________________
        From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of MikeL49NYVI@... [MikeL49NYVI@...]
        Sent: Saturday, June 09, 2012 2:48 PM
        To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] 49th letters



        Have you (or anyone else here) ever seen the poem "When the Boys In Blue
        Are Gone" by John Hendricks? He was a veteran of the 89th Indiana.
        It was given to me just before a reenactment in Kentucky, in 1993-1994 and
        I have carried it with me ever since.
        I have also read it to the men at several events, and publicly at different
        dedications and ceremonies.
        There is not way to improve upon the sentiments of that poem, and to
        better illustrate what their soldier life, and experiences meant to them.

        It is not overly long and I can reproduce it here it desired.

        We are going to take part in the "Aftermath of Battle" weekend on the 13th
        and 14th of October. It is our first time working as the 49th NY with the
        NPS, so we hope it will come off OK.

        I will be very easy to find down there, a friend is bringing some horses,
        and we have permission to ride them. So being mounted, I will be a field
        level officer, depending on what shoulder straps I have on at that time. Most
        likely Colonel.

        More fun stuff- On a 2nd reading of the letters I caught something I
        missed the first time. In his letter dated 20 Feb. 1905 Col. Alberger wrote
        that after he got the regiment into their final position he was approached
        by Adjutant General Long
        "with the compliments of General Smith (in a flask)"
        He remembered that flask 43 years later.

        Mike L





        In a message dated 6/8/2012 8:22:05 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        tgclemens@...<mailto:tgclemens%40hagerstowncc.edu> writes:

        One of the things i learned reading the letters; Carman and board
        originally wrote text for a tablet describing Baldy Smith's division being
        "checked" in their advance. Smith, and eventually Franklin, vociferously objected,
        wrote several letters arguing the point and even visted the field, along
        with Hyde of the 7th ME. Carman relented because Smith insisted his orders
        were only to advance that far, and there was no intended attack. After 30+
        year it still made a huge difference to him to say his division was not
        "checked.!" Fun stuff.

        Which weekend in October?

        ________________________________
        From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com> [TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com>] on
        behalf of MikeL49NYVI@...<mailto:MikeL49NYVI%40aol.com> [MikeL49NYVI@...<mailto:MikeL49NYVI%40aol.com>]
        Sent: Friday, June 08, 2012 4:49 PM
        To: talkantietam@yahoogroups.com<mailto:talkantietam%40yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [TalkAntietam] 49th letters

        Tom:

        The 49th NY letters came today, thank you once again.
        I dove right into them.

        Lt Colonel Alberger clearly was a well educated man, and had great
        penmanship. I only had trouble with 2-3 words in all the letters. We can
        now
        pinpoint the movements of the 49th at Gettysburg, Cedar Creek,
        Spotsylvaina,
        and Antietam.

        The letters did answer one of my questions about their advance. Their
        brigade was only to go as far as the "small hill" near the Dunker Church
        and
        wait for the rest of the division. He mentions having to hold the 49th
        back,
        as they wanted to go farther on.
        I had always wondered why they stopped with the CSA line so thin right
        there.
        It appears to me that they were sent in to guard and support the flank of
        French's Division from another push such as Cooke had just made with his
        two NC regiments.
        If you or anyone else on this forum has more information on this I'd love
        to hear it.
        We will be doing a Living History Field Hospital on the Mumma farm in
        October, and I am going to take the 49th where they marched and fought.

        Too bad Lt. Col. Alberger didn't relay the details of the "few words" he
        exchanged with Gen. Hancock as they passed by his brigade. That could have
        been interestingly insightful concerning both men, about to go into a
        desperate battle as they were. I'll wager that Hancock expected to be
        ordered to
        follow Irwin's brigade at any moment.

        Another one of those "what-if's"

        Thanks again
        Mike Lavis

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • G E Mayers
        Mike; Please share that poem with us if possible. Gerry ... From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 10, 2012
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          Mike;

          Please share that poem with us if possible.

          Gerry
          -----Original Message-----
          From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of MikeL49NYVI@...
          Sent: Saturday, June 09, 2012 2:49 PM
          To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] 49th letters



          Have you (or anyone else here) ever seen the poem "When the Boys In Blue
          Are Gone" by John Hendricks? He was a veteran of the 89th Indiana.
          It was given to me just before a reenactment in Kentucky, in 1993-1994 and
          I have carried it with me ever since.
          I have also read it to the men at several events, and publicly at different
          dedications and ceremonies.
          There is not way to improve upon the sentiments of that poem, and to
          better illustrate what their soldier life, and experiences meant to them.

          It is not overly long and I can reproduce it here it desired.

          <snip>


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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