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Re: Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?

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  • Stephen Recker
    Steve, I remember hearing about amputated limbs thrown out the windows of the Dunker Church. When the pile got to the window sill they would be loaded in a
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 11, 2011
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      Steve,

      I remember hearing about amputated limbs thrown out the windows of the Dunker Church. When the pile got to the window sill they would be loaded in a wagon and driven down the Smoketown Road to be burned in the East Woods. Can't remember where I got that one, though. You might ask Alann Schmidt.

      Stephen Recker

      --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "cowie_steve" <cowie_steve@...> wrote:
      >
      > To the forum:
      >
      > John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, wrote from Williamsport on September 21, 1862 (in part):
      >
      > "...we were again engaged I suppose in one of the most terrible battles ever fought on this Continent. Our regiment suffered little though exposed to steady danger for most two days. O the heaps and heaps of dead and dying the day after the battle, a pleasant one too, the air stank for five miles around caused by the dead bodies though lots of men were engaged burying them and had been busy day and night. Last night [Sept. 20] as we passed the different fields, for the battle extended five or six miles, they were burning the bodies of men and horses that could not be moved, and the air stank so in some places that one could hardly breathe..."
      >
      > While we've all read accounts of horse carcasses being burned after the battle, has anyone come across any sources describing the intentional burning of human remains?
      >
      > Steve
      >
    • Jim Rosebrock
      Steve, Is that quote in a diary, or collection of letters? Jim Rosebrock ________________________________ From: cowie_steve To:
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 11, 2011
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        Steve,
        Is that quote in a diary, or collection of letters?
        Jim Rosebrock



        ________________________________
        From: cowie_steve <cowie_steve@...>
        To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, November 11, 2011 8:20 AM
        Subject: [TalkAntietam] Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?


         
        To the forum:

        John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, wrote from Williamsport on September 21, 1862 (in part):

        "...we were again engaged I suppose in one of the most terrible battles ever fought on this Continent. Our regiment suffered little though exposed to steady danger for most two days. O the heaps and heaps of dead and dying the day after the battle, a pleasant one too, the air stank for five miles around caused by the dead bodies though lots of men were engaged burying them and had been busy day and night. Last night [Sept. 20] as we passed the different fields, for the battle extended five or six miles, they were burning the bodies of men and horses that could not be moved, and the air stank so in some places that one could hardly breathe..."

        While we've all read accounts of horse carcasses being burned after the battle, has anyone come across any sources describing the intentional burning of human remains?

        Steve




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • cowie_steve
        Hi, Jim. I stumbled upon this quote online while perusing a past auction at Raynors . The sale item was described as a War-date Autograph Letter Signed by
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 11, 2011
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          Hi, Jim.

          I stumbled upon this quote online while perusing a past auction at Raynors'. The sale item was described as a "War-date Autograph Letter Signed by John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, WIA at Fredericksburg 12/13/1862, 3p. octavo, Williamsport, September 21, 1862."

          Steve

          --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, Jim Rosebrock <pointsalines@...> wrote:
          >
          > Steve,
          > Is that quote in a diary, or collection of letters?
          > Jim Rosebrock
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: cowie_steve <cowie_steve@...>
          > To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Friday, November 11, 2011 8:20 AM
          > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?
          >
          >
          >  
          > To the forum:
          >
          > John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, wrote from Williamsport on September 21, 1862 (in part):
          >
          > "...we were again engaged I suppose in one of the most terrible battles ever fought on this Continent. Our regiment suffered little though exposed to steady danger for most two days. O the heaps and heaps of dead and dying the day after the battle, a pleasant one too, the air stank for five miles around caused by the dead bodies though lots of men were engaged burying them and had been busy day and night. Last night [Sept. 20] as we passed the different fields, for the battle extended five or six miles, they were burning the bodies of men and horses that could not be moved, and the air stank so in some places that one could hardly breathe..."
          >
          > While we've all read accounts of horse carcasses being burned after the battle, has anyone come across any sources describing the intentional burning of human remains?
          >
          > Steve
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Jim Rosebrock
          Thanks Steve, Was wondering if it was in a collection of some kind.  I have never heard of them burning human bodies.  Horses and livestock are another
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 11, 2011
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            Thanks Steve,
            Was wondering if it was in a collection of some kind.  I have never heard of them burning human bodies.  Horses and livestock are another matter.
            Jim



            ________________________________
            From: cowie_steve <cowie_steve@...>
            To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, November 11, 2011 10:26 AM
            Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?


             
            Hi, Jim.

            I stumbled upon this quote online while perusing a past auction at Raynors'. The sale item was described as a "War-date Autograph Letter Signed by John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, WIA at Fredericksburg 12/13/1862, 3p. octavo, Williamsport, September 21, 1862."

            Steve

            --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, Jim Rosebrock <pointsalines@...> wrote:
            >
            > Steve,
            > Is that quote in a diary, or collection of letters?
            > Jim Rosebrock
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: cowie_steve <cowie_steve@...>
            > To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Friday, November 11, 2011 8:20 AM
            > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?
            >
            >
            >  
            > To the forum:
            >
            > John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, wrote from Williamsport on September 21, 1862 (in part):
            >
            > "...we were again engaged I suppose in one of the most terrible battles ever fought on this Continent. Our regiment suffered little though exposed to steady danger for most two days. O the heaps and heaps of dead and dying the day after the battle, a pleasant one too, the air stank for five miles around caused by the dead bodies though lots of men were engaged burying them and had been busy day and night. Last night [Sept. 20] as we passed the different fields, for the battle extended five or six miles, they were burning the bodies of men and horses that could not be moved, and the air stank so in some places that one could hardly breathe..."
            >
            > While we've all read accounts of horse carcasses being burned after the battle, has anyone come across any sources describing the intentional burning of human remains?
            >
            > Steve
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Thomas G. Clemens
            It is rare. Years ago I ran across a letter from a Union soldier noting they burned bodies of Confederate bodies on Maryland heights since the ground was too
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 11, 2011
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              It is rare. Years ago I ran across a letter from a Union soldier noting they burned bodies of Confederate bodies on Maryland heights since the ground was too difficult to dig. I think I persuaded Dennis Frye to buy it for Harpers Ferry NHP.
              ________________________________
              From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Stephen Recker [recker@...]
              Sent: Friday, November 11, 2011 8:33 AM
              To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?



              Steve,

              I remember hearing about amputated limbs thrown out the windows of the Dunker Church. When the pile got to the window sill they would be loaded in a wagon and driven down the Smoketown Road to be burned in the East Woods. Can't remember where I got that one, though. You might ask Alann Schmidt.

              Stephen Recker

              --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com>, "cowie_steve" <cowie_steve@...> wrote:
              >
              > To the forum:
              >
              > John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, wrote from Williamsport on September 21, 1862 (in part):
              >
              > "...we were again engaged I suppose in one of the most terrible battles ever fought on this Continent. Our regiment suffered little though exposed to steady danger for most two days. O the heaps and heaps of dead and dying the day after the battle, a pleasant one too, the air stank for five miles around caused by the dead bodies though lots of men were engaged burying them and had been busy day and night. Last night [Sept. 20] as we passed the different fields, for the battle extended five or six miles, they were burning the bodies of men and horses that could not be moved, and the air stank so in some places that one could hardly breathe..."
              >
              > While we've all read accounts of horse carcasses being burned after the battle, has anyone come across any sources describing the intentional burning of human remains?
              >
              > Steve
              >





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • cowie_steve
              Stephen, thanks for the information. I ve read accounts where limbs were buried in trenches but this is the first I ve heard of anything being burned. And Tom,
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 11, 2011
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                Stephen, thanks for the information. I've read accounts where limbs were buried in trenches but this is the first I've heard of anything being burned.

                And Tom, thank you for sharing the account regarding Maryland Heights. I've hiked to the exterior stone fort atop the crest several times and couldn't imagine digging into that narrow, rocky, boulder-laden ground (the actual battle site is now on private property) -- or transporting bodies down the incredibly steep mountain in period footwear. Do you recall if the Union soldier letter you mentioned pertained to the Maryland campaign?

                Steve

                --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas G. Clemens" <tgclemens@...> wrote:
                >
                > It is rare. Years ago I ran across a letter from a Union soldier noting they burned bodies of Confederate bodies on Maryland heights since the ground was too difficult to dig. I think I persuaded Dennis Frye to buy it for Harpers Ferry NHP.
                > ________________________________
                > From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Stephen Recker [recker@...]
                > Sent: Friday, November 11, 2011 8:33 AM
                > To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Burial duty at Antietam: burning of bodies?
                >
                >
                >
                > Steve,
                >
                > I remember hearing about amputated limbs thrown out the windows of the Dunker Church. When the pile got to the window sill they would be loaded in a wagon and driven down the Smoketown Road to be burned in the East Woods. Can't remember where I got that one, though. You might ask Alann Schmidt.
                >
                > Stephen Recker
                >
                > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com<mailto:TalkAntietam%40yahoogroups.com>, "cowie_steve" <cowie_steve@> wrote:
                > >
                > > To the forum:
                > >
                > > John C. Sunderlin, 5th Vermont Infantry, wrote from Williamsport on September 21, 1862 (in part):
                > >
                > > "...we were again engaged I suppose in one of the most terrible battles ever fought on this Continent. Our regiment suffered little though exposed to steady danger for most two days. O the heaps and heaps of dead and dying the day after the battle, a pleasant one too, the air stank for five miles around caused by the dead bodies though lots of men were engaged burying them and had been busy day and night. Last night [Sept. 20] as we passed the different fields, for the battle extended five or six miles, they were burning the bodies of men and horses that could not be moved, and the air stank so in some places that one could hardly breathe..."
                > >
                > > While we've all read accounts of horse carcasses being burned after the battle, has anyone come across any sources describing the intentional burning of human remains?
                > >
                > > Steve
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
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