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Re: Wounding of "Greasy Dick" Richardson was A R Lawton Wounding

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  • cowie_steve
    Hi, Gerry. Good question as discrepancies abound regarding Richardson s wound. Pierro s Carman describes a ball of spherical case hitting the general; Schildt
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 8, 2011
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      Hi, Gerry.

      Good question as discrepancies abound regarding Richardson's wound. Pierro's Carman describes a ball of spherical case hitting the general; Schildt has a shell fragment hitting Richardson's hip; an undocumented source in my notes places the wound in the ribs; Krick wrote that a piece of shell struck Richardson, "mangling his shoulder." I'd like to hear what others in the forum have found.

      Steve

      --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...> wrote:
      >
      > Steve,
      >
      > One of the mysteries surrounding Dick Richardson's death was the nature of
      > his wounding while trying to get or direct artillery fire on the
      > Confederates in the Sunken Road.... Do you know precisely what the wound was
      > that eventually killed him?
      >
      > Yr. Obt. Svt.
      > G E "Gerry" Mayers
      >
      > To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even on one's
      > mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the Union, a passport to
      > any foreign country, and a benediction from the Almighty God. --Anonymous
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com]On
      > Behalf Of cowie_steve
      > Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 8:06 PM
      > To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Wounding of Alexander Lawton
      >
      >
      >
      > Thank you, Teej.
      >
      > This is great information and fills in many blanks. I couldn't help but to
      > draw a parallel to Lawton's poor diet of oysters, beefsteak and eggnog
      > allegedly contributing to his slow recovery, as Elizabeth Pry claimed that
      > Israel Richardson's sweet tooth, while recovering in her home, supposedly
      > led to his demise. But that's an entirely different topic...
      >
      > Much obliged,
      >
      > Steve
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • James Buchanan
      Regarding Richardson. Jack C. Mason in his Until Antietam: The Life and Letters of Major General Israel B. Richardson, U.S. Army (Carbondale, Illinois:
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 8, 2011
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        Regarding Richardson.

        Jack C. Mason in his Until Antietam: The Life and Letters of Major General Israel B. Richardson, U.S. Army (Carbondale, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 2009) has this account:

        "Richardson was struck in the upper part of his left shoulder by a shell fragment, which passed downward, possibly penetrating his left lung, inflicting a severe wound." p. 189

        Once removed to the Pry House, "the doctors tried to remove the fragment of shell that was buried deep within Richardson's chest. His surgeon, Dr. J.H. Taylor, probed seven inches for the metal but was unable to reach it. His fear and the medical opinion was that the fragment had passed into the cavity of the left lung, which must eventually produce his death." p. 192

        "Early on, Richardson suffered from an attack of pneumonia, which seemed to confirm the fact that his lung had been critically damaged and the case would be fatal. When he was able to fight off the pneumonia and show progress in his recovery, the experts began to think there was a chance for his survival." p. 193

        Once past the pneumonia, he appeared to be making progress on his recovery. His sister Marcella wrote, "'Israel improves slowly but surely. The Dr. says he has had continual drawbacks--only slight, but still they keep him weak--and in bed, he has not set up for a week. His pulse is good, sleeps most of the time, has a little more appetite, takes very little medicine. His wound is nearly well; gives him no pain or uneasiness now. ..." pp. 193-194

        "By the end of October, still at the Pry house, Richardson's condition was starting to deteriorate. An infection to the wound had set in, and Dr. Taylor became very concerned. The doctor noted, 'His nervous system is much shocked. So much so that he makes no effort to rally, and has himself given up all hopes for recovery.' Soon it became clear that the infection would be fatal, as Richardson gradually weakened. ... Finally, on the evening of November 3, at half past seven, Major General Israel Bush Richardson succumbed to his wound and died." p. 196.

        On Jul 8, 2011, at 7:48 AM, cowie_steve wrote:

        > Hi, Gerry.
        >
        > Good question as discrepancies abound regarding Richardson's wound. Pierro's Carman describes a ball of spherical case hitting the general; Schildt has a shell fragment hitting Richardson's hip; an undocumented source in my notes places the wound in the ribs; Krick wrote that a piece of shell struck Richardson, "mangling his shoulder." I'd like to hear what others in the forum have found.
        >
        > Steve
        >
        > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Steve,
        > >
        > > One of the mysteries surrounding Dick Richardson's death was the nature of
        > > his wounding while trying to get or direct artillery fire on the
        > > Confederates in the Sunken Road.... Do you know precisely what the wound was
        > > that eventually killed him?
        > >
        > > Yr. Obt. Svt.
        > > G E "Gerry" Mayers
        > >
        > > To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even on one's
        > > mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the Union, a passport to
        > > any foreign country, and a benediction from the Almighty God. --Anonymous
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com]On
        > > Behalf Of cowie_steve
        > > Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 8:06 PM
        > > To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Wounding of Alexander Lawton
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Thank you, Teej.
        > >
        > > This is great information and fills in many blanks. I couldn't help but to
        > > draw a parallel to Lawton's poor diet of oysters, beefsteak and eggnog
        > > allegedly contributing to his slow recovery, as Elizabeth Pry claimed that
        > > Israel Richardson's sweet tooth, while recovering in her home, supposedly
        > > led to his demise. But that's an entirely different topic...
        > >
        > > Much obliged,
        > >
        > > Steve
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • G E Mayers
        James; Apparently we did not know there was such a book. Thank you very much for basically putting an end to the discrepancies. So it appears, IIRC;, Krick was
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 8, 2011
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          James;

          Apparently we did not know there was such a book. Thank you very
          much for basically putting an end to the discrepancies. So it
          appears, IIRC;, Krick was right!

          Yr. Obt. Svt.
          G E "Gerry" Mayers

          To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
          on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
          Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
          the Almighty God. --Anonymous

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
          > James Buchanan
          > Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 8:23 AM
          > To: TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: Wounding of "Greasy
          > Dick" Richardson was
          > A R Lawton Wounding
          >
          >
          > Regarding Richardson.
          >
          > Jack C. Mason in his Until Antietam: The Life and
          > Letters of Major General Israel B. Richardson, U.S.
          > Army (Carbondale, Illinois: Southern Illinois
          > University Press, 2009) has this account:
          >
          > "Richardson was struck in the upper part of his left
          > shoulder by a shell fragment, which passed downward,
          > possibly penetrating his left lung, inflicting a
          > severe wound." p. 189
          >
          > Once removed to the Pry House, "the doctors tried to
          > remove the fragment of shell that was buried deep
          > within Richardson's chest. His surgeon, Dr. J.H.
          > Taylor, probed seven inches for the metal but was
          > unable to reach it. His fear and the medical opinion
          > was that the fragment had passed into the cavity of
          > the left lung, which must eventually produce his death." p. 192
          >
          > "Early on, Richardson suffered from an attack of
          > pneumonia, which seemed to confirm the fact that his
          > lung had been critically damaged and the case would be
          > fatal. When he was able to fight off the pneumonia and
          > show progress in his recovery, the experts began to
          > think there was a chance for his survival." p. 193
          >
          > Once past the pneumonia, he appeared to be making
          > progress on his recovery. His sister Marcella wrote,
          > "'Israel improves slowly but surely. The Dr. says he
          > has had continual drawbacks--only slight, but still
          > they keep him weak--and in bed, he has not set up for
          > a week. His pulse is good, sleeps most of the time,
          > has a little more appetite, takes very little
          > medicine. His wound is nearly well; gives him no pain
          > or uneasiness now. ..." pp. 193-194
          >
          > "By the end of October, still at the Pry house,
          > Richardson's condition was starting to deteriorate. An
          > infection to the wound had set in, and Dr. Taylor
          > became very concerned. The doctor noted, 'His nervous
          > system is much shocked. So much so that he makes no
          > effort to rally, and has himself given up all hopes
          > for recovery.' Soon it became clear that the infection
          > would be fatal, as Richardson gradually weakened. ...
          > Finally, on the evening of November 3, at half past
          > seven, Major General Israel Bush Richardson succumbed
          > to his wound and died." p. 196.
          >
          > On Jul 8, 2011, at 7:48 AM, cowie_steve wrote:
          >
          > > Hi, Gerry.
          > >
          > > Good question as discrepancies abound regarding
          > Richardson's wound. Pierro's Carman describes a ball
          > of spherical case hitting the general; Schildt has a
          > shell fragment hitting Richardson's hip; an
          > undocumented source in my notes places the wound in
          > the ribs; Krick wrote that a piece of shell struck
          > Richardson, "mangling his shoulder." I'd like to hear
          > what others in the forum have found.
          > >
          > > Steve
          > >
          >
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