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Re: Belinda Springs

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  • eighth_conn_inf
    GM A quick search shows a picture of the resort on page 21 of Images of America, Washington County, by Rubin, ISBN 978-0738514185. You may see it on Amazon
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 28, 2010
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      GM
      A quick search shows a picture of the resort on page 21 of "Images of America, Washington County," by Rubin, ISBN 978-0738514185. You may see it on Amazon on "look inside."

      LF

      --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear Larry,
      >
      > Thanks for the info; the Register application for the Sharpsburg village is also very interesting. I shall have to review that at more length.
      >
      > Any photos available of the Snavely farm?
      >
      > Yr. Obt. Svt.
      > G E "Gerry" Mayers
      >
      > To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from the Almighty God. --Anonymous
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...>
      > To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2010 11:19 AM
      > Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Belinda Springs
      >
      >
      > > Maybe these words can help:
      > >
      > > Snavely farm (Belinda Springs)
      > >
      > > Near Snavely's Ford below the Burnside Bridge on the Antietam is the old
      > > Snavely farm which existed earlier as Belinda Springs farm, an early-
      > > 19th-century resort. It is located at the end of a long private lane.
      > > The buildings are situated at the base of a steep bluff and face east or
      > > toward the creek. What remains of the Belinda Springs complex is a twostory
      > > log dwelling and a one-and-one-half-story stone structure with frame
      > > addition giving it an upper story and attaching it to the log section, several
      > > frame outbuildings, and the ruins of a large frame bank barn set on high stone
      > > foundations. A small stone structure housing one of the springs also remains.
      > > Before the war, Belinda Springs was a regionally well-known health spa.
      > > There was a large complex of buildings where many visitors came to stay and
      > > take the cure. In 1832, a cholera epidemic broke out among Irish workers
      > > on the C & O Canal and Belinda Springs as a resort was closed for good.
      > > During the Battle of Antietam, the Snavely family owned Belinda Springs,
      > > and it was near Snavely's Ford where Rodman's command crossed the Antietam
      > > to outflank the impasse at the Burnside Bridge. Belinda Springs has already
      > > been submitted to the National Register as a separate nomination.
      > >
      > > a. Farmhouse
      > >
      > > The log structure is a two-story, three-bay dwelling set on fieldstone
      > > foundations. It is constructed of large hewn-squared logs, many of which
      > > are greater than one foot in width. The exterior wall surface was
      > > apparently sheathed with rough cast applied over split lath. Over this
      > > had been placed wooden weatherboarding. More recently, brick composition
      > > siding had sheathed the walls. A shed roof porch extends along the
      > > south gable wall. An enclosed walkway of frame construction along the
      > > east elevation links it to the stone structure. At present, the roof of
      > > the log structure is sheathed with sheet metal. Probably the most
      > > unusual feature of the log structure is an interior partition of wattle
      > > and daub.
      > >
      > > b. Stone house
      > >
      > > Linked by the walkway to this log building is a one-and-one-half-story
      > > stone structure constructed of roughly coursed local limestone. A
      > > frame one-story addition has raised the height of this stone building.
      > > A massive stone chimney is located in the east gable end.
      > >
      > > c. The Belinda Springs Hotel
      > >
      > > Extending to the north of the log building are the remains of foundations
      > > of a large extension. This was once a high two-story building of log
      > > construction sheathed with weatherboarding. This structure, torn down
      > > earlier in this century, was known as the Belinda Springs Hotel.
      > >
      > >
      > > d. Spring
      > >
      > > East of the existing structures is a spring over which is a small stone
      > > building and remnants of an attached stone wall. This spring supposedly
      > > supplied drinking water for the complex. Nearby were other springs deemed
      > > medicinal with high mineral content.
      > >
      > > Link:
      > >
      > > http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Text/66000038.pdf
      > >
      > > Probably now on private property?
      > >
      > > Larry
      > >
      > > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "s_recker" <recker@> wrote:
      > >>
      > >> Can someone please point me to Belinda Springs on a map? Thanks.
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • G E Mayers
      Thanks! Yr. Obt. Svt. G E Gerry Mayers To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even on one s mother s side, is an introduction to any
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 28, 2010
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        Thanks!

        Yr. Obt. Svt.
        G E "Gerry" Mayers

        To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from the Almighty God. --Anonymous
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...>
        To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2010 2:27 PM
        Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Belinda Springs


        > GM
        > A quick search shows a picture of the resort on page 21 of "Images of America, Washington County," by Rubin, ISBN 978-0738514185. You may see it on Amazon on "look inside."
        >
        > LF
        >
        > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> Dear Larry,
        >>
        >> Thanks for the info; the Register application for the Sharpsburg village is also very interesting. I shall have to review that at more length.
        >>
        >> Any photos available of the Snavely farm?
        >>
        >> Yr. Obt. Svt.
        >> G E "Gerry" Mayers
        >>
        >> To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from the Almighty God. --Anonymous
        >> ----- Original Message -----
        >> From: "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...>
        >> To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
        >> Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2010 11:19 AM
        >> Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: Belinda Springs
        >>
        >>
        >> > Maybe these words can help:
        >> >
        >> > Snavely farm (Belinda Springs)
        >> >
        >> > Near Snavely's Ford below the Burnside Bridge on the Antietam is the old
        >> > Snavely farm which existed earlier as Belinda Springs farm, an early-
        >> > 19th-century resort. It is located at the end of a long private lane.
        >> > The buildings are situated at the base of a steep bluff and face east or
        >> > toward the creek. What remains of the Belinda Springs complex is a twostory
        >> > log dwelling and a one-and-one-half-story stone structure with frame
        >> > addition giving it an upper story and attaching it to the log section, several
        >> > frame outbuildings, and the ruins of a large frame bank barn set on high stone
        >> > foundations. A small stone structure housing one of the springs also remains.
        >> > Before the war, Belinda Springs was a regionally well-known health spa.
        >> > There was a large complex of buildings where many visitors came to stay and
        >> > take the cure. In 1832, a cholera epidemic broke out among Irish workers
        >> > on the C & O Canal and Belinda Springs as a resort was closed for good.
        >> > During the Battle of Antietam, the Snavely family owned Belinda Springs,
        >> > and it was near Snavely's Ford where Rodman's command crossed the Antietam
        >> > to outflank the impasse at the Burnside Bridge. Belinda Springs has already
        >> > been submitted to the National Register as a separate nomination.
        >> >
        >> > a. Farmhouse
        >> >
        >> > The log structure is a two-story, three-bay dwelling set on fieldstone
        >> > foundations. It is constructed of large hewn-squared logs, many of which
        >> > are greater than one foot in width. The exterior wall surface was
        >> > apparently sheathed with rough cast applied over split lath. Over this
        >> > had been placed wooden weatherboarding. More recently, brick composition
        >> > siding had sheathed the walls. A shed roof porch extends along the
        >> > south gable wall. An enclosed walkway of frame construction along the
        >> > east elevation links it to the stone structure. At present, the roof of
        >> > the log structure is sheathed with sheet metal. Probably the most
        >> > unusual feature of the log structure is an interior partition of wattle
        >> > and daub.
        >> >
        >> > b. Stone house
        >> >
        >> > Linked by the walkway to this log building is a one-and-one-half-story
        >> > stone structure constructed of roughly coursed local limestone. A
        >> > frame one-story addition has raised the height of this stone building.
        >> > A massive stone chimney is located in the east gable end.
        >> >
        >> > c. The Belinda Springs Hotel
        >> >
        >> > Extending to the north of the log building are the remains of foundations
        >> > of a large extension. This was once a high two-story building of log
        >> > construction sheathed with weatherboarding. This structure, torn down
        >> > earlier in this century, was known as the Belinda Springs Hotel.
        >> >
        >> >
        >> > d. Spring
        >> >
        >> > East of the existing structures is a spring over which is a small stone
        >> > building and remnants of an attached stone wall. This spring supposedly
        >> > supplied drinking water for the complex. Nearby were other springs deemed
        >> > medicinal with high mineral content.
        >> >
        >> > Link:
        >> >
        >> > http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Text/66000038.pdf
        >> >
        >> > Probably now on private property?
        >> >
        >> > Larry
        >> >
        >> > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "s_recker" <recker@> wrote:
        >> >>
        >> >> Can someone please point me to Belinda Springs on a map? Thanks.
        >> >>
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >>
        >
        >
        >
      • eighth_conn_inf
        GM And if you use that link and change the last digits just before .pdf, you can see others such as the C&O Canal:
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 28, 2010
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          GM

          And if you use that link and change the last digits just before .pdf, you can see others such as the C&O Canal:

          http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Text/66000036.pdf

          and Manassas, and Ford's Theater, and the Washington Monument, etc. Unfortunately they all appear to be from the 1980's but there still is lots of interesting info.

          LF

          --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...> wrote:
          >
          > GM
          > A quick search shows a picture of the resort on page 21 of "Images of America, Washington County," by Rubin, ISBN 978-0738514185. You may see it on Amazon on "look inside."
          >
          > LF
          >
          > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Dear Larry,
          > >
          > > Thanks for the info; the Register application for the Sharpsburg village is also very interesting. I shall have to review that at more length.
          > >
          > > Any photos available of the Snavely farm?
          > >
          > > Yr. Obt. Svt.
          > > G E "Gerry" Mayers
        • jeffcowvplanning
          There are photos of Belinda Springs in the Washington County Historical Society photo files. About 6....some ruins..some not. Hope this helps. Steve
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 2, 2010
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            There are photos of Belinda Springs in the Washington County Historical Society photo files. About 6....some ruins..some not.

            Hope this helps.
            Steve Bockmiller

            --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...> wrote:
            >
            > GM
            >
            > And if you use that link and change the last digits just before .pdf, you can see others such as the C&O Canal:
            >
            > http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Text/66000036.pdf
            >
            > and Manassas, and Ford's Theater, and the Washington Monument, etc. Unfortunately they all appear to be from the 1980's but there still is lots of interesting info.
            >
            > LF
            >
            > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@> wrote:
            > >
            > > GM
            > > A quick search shows a picture of the resort on page 21 of "Images of America, Washington County," by Rubin, ISBN 978-0738514185. You may see it on Amazon on "look inside."
            > >
            > > LF
            > >
            > > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Dear Larry,
            > > >
            > > > Thanks for the info; the Register application for the Sharpsburg village is also very interesting. I shall have to review that at more length.
            > > >
            > > > Any photos available of the Snavely farm?
            > > >
            > > > Yr. Obt. Svt.
            > > > G E "Gerry" Mayers
            >
          • dickeyr46
            All, In case you re not aware, Lee and Barbara Barron in their booklet The History of Sharpsburg Maryland addressed Belinda Springs starting on page 49 and
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 3, 2010
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              All,
              In case you're not aware, Lee and Barbara Barron in their booklet "The History of Sharpsburg Maryland" addressed Belinda Springs starting on page 49 and with a picture on page 51. First published in 1972, they show Jacob Gardenhour buying the property in 1818 and by 1822 having the resort up and running with ".. many attractions, including horse racing, cock fighting, bowling alleys, billard rooms, bath houses, drinking and tonsorial salons." The name is in honor of his wife. The springs were sold in 1844 and continued their decline. The Barron's conclude with the sentence, "For its day, Belinda Springs was a magnificent place, known all over the country as one of the finest resorts to be visited anywhere."
              Ron Dickey

              --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "jeffcowvplanning" <jeffcowvplanning@...> wrote:
              >
              > There are photos of Belinda Springs in the Washington County Historical Society photo files. About 6....some ruins..some not.
              >
              > Hope this helps.
              > Steve Bockmiller
              >
              > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@> wrote:
              > >
              > > GM
              > >
              > > And if you use that link and change the last digits just before .pdf, you can see others such as the C&O Canal:
              > >
              > > http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Text/66000036.pdf
              > >
              > > and Manassas, and Ford's Theater, and the Washington Monument, etc. Unfortunately they all appear to be from the 1980's but there still is lots of interesting info.
              > >
              > > LF
              > >
              > > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > GM
              > > > A quick search shows a picture of the resort on page 21 of "Images of America, Washington County," by Rubin, ISBN 978-0738514185. You may see it on Amazon on "look inside."
              > > >
              > > > LF
              > > >
              > > > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers" <gerry1952@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Dear Larry,
              > > > >
              > > > > Thanks for the info; the Register application for the Sharpsburg village is also very interesting. I shall have to review that at more length.
              > > > >
              > > > > Any photos available of the Snavely farm?
              > > > >
              > > > > Yr. Obt. Svt.
              > > > > G E "Gerry" Mayers
              > >
              >
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