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Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: queston about parallel routes toHagerstownTurnpike north from Sharpsburg

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  • G E Mayers
    Tom, You are in NYC?? You are about ninety minutes due East of me! Yr. Obt. Svt. G E Gerry Mayers To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 18, 2009
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      Tom,

      You are in NYC?? You are about ninety minutes due East of me!

      Yr. Obt. Svt.
      G E "Gerry" Mayers

      To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or even
      on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
      Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction from
      the Almighty God. --Anonymous
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...>
      To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 1:27 PM
      Subject: Re: [TalkAntietam] Re: queston about parallel routes
      toHagerstownTurnpike north from Sharpsburg


      > Larry, I am away from home and sources right now, but IIRC one
      > ofthe
      > cavalry regiments camps on the night of the 16th up past the
      > Squirrel
      > Level Church, with a few hundred yards of the Bakersville road.
      > It
      > strikes me as logical that they'd know about a road that close
      > to them,
      > but maybe not.
      > BTW, I am in HOG HEAVEN at the NYPL looking at the Ezra Carman
      > Collection. A lot of stuff not on the microfilm!
      >
      >
      > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
      > Professor of History
      > Hagerstown Community College
      >
      >
      >>>> "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...> 03/17/09 4:15
      >>>> PM >>>
      > Tom,
      >
      > Thanks to Carman, we have an
      > idea where the 17th's expedition was but the scout on the 16th
      > I
      > think we only have Blackford. Do you think Stuart's scout on
      > the
      > morning/afternoon of the 16th was in the same area that Lee
      > wanted
      > Jackson to attack on the 17th? Were there any Union troops in
      > that
      > area on the 16th? If not, and if Blackford is correct about
      > running
      > into Union troops he had to be closer to the Hagerstown Pike
      > around
      > the North Woods later in the afternoon on the 16th when
      > Doubleday
      > arrived? Do you think Blackford and Stuart went all the way to
      > the
      > Williamsport-Keedysville Road (today's Bakersville and Spielman
      > Rds
      > part of Rt 63) on the 16th west of the Hagerstown Pike or even
      > to the
      > Boonsboro-Williamsport Road (today's Rt 68)?
      >
      > It is about 1 ¾ straight-
      > line miles from the Dunkard Church to the
      > Keedysville-Williamsport Rd
      > and about 4 ½ to the Boonsboro-Williamsport Rd. There is a road
      > to the
      > west,
      > the Downsville Pike Rt 632 which runs from Rt 63 to
      > Hagerstown in pretty much a straight line which road I believe
      > existed in 1862. I guess Stuart did not get that far either day
      > but he
      > may have had a chance on the 16th?
      >
      > Many of the modern-day roads in the area from Sharpsburg to
      > Williamsport to Hagerstown seem to have been the same in 1862
      > so
      > Stuart did have some options to the NW but if he could not get
      > further north than Mercersville, I guess those options wouldn't
      > help.
      >
      >
      > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "G E Mayers"
      > <gerry1952@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> Dear Tom,
      >>
      >> Was the Cox's Farm Road expedition a viable one? Did Harsh
      >> ever
      >> indicate to you his thoughts on it? Apparently Stuart must
      >> have
      >> communicated something of worth to Lee if Lee, Longstreet and
      >> Jackson were reviewing the larger scale maps of the area when
      >> word comes to them at the Grove House of Hooker's crossing the
      >> Antietam.
      >>
      >> Yr. Obt. Svt.
      >> G E "Gerry" Mayers
      >>
      >> To Be A Virginian, either by birth, marriage, adoption, or
      >> even
      >> on one's mother's side, is an introduction to any state in the
      >> Union, a passport to any foreign country, and a benediction
      >> from
      >> the Almighty God. --Anonymous
      >> ----- Original Message -----
      >> From: "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...>
      >> To: <TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com>
      >> Sent: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 12:04 PM
      >> Subject: [TalkAntietam] Re: queston about parallel routes to
      >> HagerstownTurnpike north from Sharpsburg
      >>
      >>
      >> >I think what Gerry is talking about is the road now known as
      >> >Mondell road and then Taylor's Landing Road which led to the
      >> >aforementioned site on the Potomac. From there a road led
      >> >along
      >> >the banks for some distance and roads branching off that led
      >> >back to the Pike and others to the Boonsboro - Williamsport
      >> >road. It shows on local maps and the names are not
      >> >mentioned,
      >> >thus I am using modern names. It was Harsh's opinion that
      >> >the
      >> >"Cox Farm expedition" was an attempt to see if that road was
      >> >usable to evacuate the army northward toward Hagerstown.
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > Dr. Thomas G. Clemens
      >> > Professor of History
      >> > Hagerstown Community College
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >>>> "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...> 3/17/2009 8:22
      >> >>>> AM >>>
      >> >
      >> > I should have looked at Carman more closely; he says about
      >> > the
      >> > Antietam battlefield "The turnpike, country roads, and farm
      >> > lanes gave ready access to all parts of the field upon
      >> > which,
      >> > save along the banks of the Antietam itself, there were no
      >> > obstacl> > of artillery." Later he mentions "farm lanes" in
      >> > several
      >> > places. He often names the lanes for the farms to which they
      >> > lead likely echoing usage at the time. In another place
      >> > Carman
      >> > mentions a "stock lane" which implies only a cattle path
      >> > rather
      >> > than a "regular" farm lane.
      >> >
      >> > Lanes were important as they usually had some type of
      >> > fencing
      >> > on either side (as did pikes and other roads) as they
      >> > traversed
      >> > various farmers' fields so provided some cover as well as
      >> > barriers for troop movements. Looks like determining which
      >> > lanes couriers/cavalry used will be interesting lacking
      >> > primary
      >> > sources.
      >> >
      >> > Larry
      >> >
      >> > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "eighth_conn_inf"
      >> > <eighth_conn_inf@> wrote:
      >> >>
      >> >> Gerry,
      >> >>
      >> >> Looking at the CC maps closely, the spaces between the
      >> >> various
      >> >> types of fences around fields frequently have a regular
      >> >> dotted
      >> >> line shown. The map legend doesn't list this symbol so I
      >> >> wonder if it indicates a farm path. This makes sense as
      >> >> farmers must get their teams to fields to plow and wagons
      >> >> to
      >> >> harvest crops. So if many/most of these are wide enough to
      >> >> let
      >> >> a wagon pass, they are also passable to couriers, etc.?
      >> >>
      >> >> Following the Smoketown Rd from the Dunkard Church towards
      >> >> Smoketown shows that this dotted line splits as it enters
      >> >> the
      >> >> East Woods and connects the parts of the road. I don't
      >> >> recall
      >> >> reading comments about this link--anyone have any cites
      >> >> referencing this connection or helpful statements about
      >> >> farm
      >> >> lanes? Any thoughts? Or am I just coming late to this
      >> >> realization about lanes = regular dotted lines?
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >> Larry
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >> >
      >> >
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
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