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Re: While we're talking about gaps and roads...

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  • eighth_conn_inf
    Tom, I just received and looked thru The Braddock expedition and Fox s Gap in Maryland and it does help. The author shows that the road thru Fox s Gap and
    Message 1 of 22 , Mar 9, 2009
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      Tom,

      I just received and looked thru "The Braddock expedition and Fox's Gap in Maryland" and it does help. The author shows that the road thru Fox's Gap and the road thru Orr's Gap predate the road thru Turner's Pass so the Dahlgren Rd could not be the earliest OHR. I guess at best it was an American Indian trail.

      He confirms that Orr's Gap is the one the interstate now goes thru. He also shows that "Fox's Gap" and the "Old Sharpsburg Rd" were the correct names during the CW and that Hill's, Stuart's, etc., references to Braddocks' Gap and Braddock's Rd was not in use by Maryland residents at that time. He also implies that the use of "Hamburg Gap" by Ripley et al during the CW was incorrect rather it was Orr's Gap unless my inference is wrong. He also shows that "Braddock's Gap" was used incorrectly for Orr's Gap.

      I will continue looking thru the book; it is somewhat difficult to easily parse as it contains a lot of original material including surveys and old letters. Another book by Mr. Older may help if anyone has it: "The Land Tracts of the Battlefield of South Mountain: Including Many Other Tracts near the Area from Land Records of Frederick County, Washington County and the Maryland Archives." Perhaps Mr. Older could speak at a SHAF event if he is available?

      Larry F.

      > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Larry,
      > > Thank you for your work on this and your careful scrutiny of the maps. If, and it is an if, we assume that the OHR goes nowhere near Turner's Gap or Frosttown Gap, what do we do with Carman's statment. John Frye thinks what is Dahlgren Road now was the earliest crossing of the gap, and thus by default classifies as an OHR. But how did Carman know that, and ignore the other? WHere did the idea of this being OHR originate? Are we looking at another "Ripley and Hamburg Pass" situation?
      > >
      > >
      > > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
      > > Professor of History
      > > Hagerstown Community
      >
    • Stephen Recker
      I ve come across two gentlemen that both took photos around Sharpsburg circa 1890: Millard F. Smith b. 26 Nov 1852 d. 12 Nov. 1925 Erasmus M. Garrott, M.D.
      Message 2 of 22 , Mar 14, 2009
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        I've come across two gentlemen that both took photos around Sharpsburg
        circa 1890:

        Millard F. Smith b. 26 Nov 1852 d. 12 Nov. 1925
        Erasmus M. Garrott, M.D. b. 1 Jan 1865 d. 6 Nov 1929

        Interestingly, they are buried rather close to each other (and O.T.
        Reilly) in Mountain View Cemetery, Sharpsburg.

        Anyone know anything about these two? Thanks.

        Stephen
      • msjillm53
        ... The name Erasmus Garrott is vaguely familiar in connection with a work-related paper I did a few years ago about smallpox. I went through my notes and
        Message 3 of 22 , Mar 15, 2009
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          --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Recker <recker@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've come across two gentlemen that both took photos around Sharpsburg
          > circa 1890:
          >
          > Millard F. Smith b. 26 Nov 1852 d. 12 Nov. 1925
          > Erasmus M. Garrott, M.D. b. 1 Jan 1865 d. 6 Nov 1929
          >
          > Interestingly, they are buried rather close to each other (and O.T.
          > Reilly) in Mountain View Cemetery, Sharpsburg.
          >
          > Anyone know anything about these two? Thanks.
          >
          > Stephen
          >

          The name Erasmus Garrott is vaguely familiar in connection with a work-related paper I did a few years ago about smallpox. I went through my notes and found the following, an obituary published in the June 18, 1898, edition of the publication Naval and Military Medical Services:

          "Dr. Erasmus Garrott, Chief Medical Inspector, Department of Health, City of Chicago, whose death was announced in a recent issue of the BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, was born at Knoxville, Frederick Co., Maryland, in 1836. He graduated at the Medical Department of the University of Maryland in 1856, was an interne in the hospital at Baltimore for a year, and was afterwards in country practice for three years in West Virginia. In 1860 he engaged in practice in the mining town of Central City, Gilpin Co., Colorado. Settling in Chicago in 1873, he at once became connected with public sanitary work during the rebuilding of the city after the great fire of 1871. At this time a great responsibility fell upon the medical profession, because of the increased illness in the city from lack of proper food and shelter. Dr. Garrott was appointed Medical Inspector in 1890, serving the city faithfully more than twenty-one years. Dr. Garrott was wholly wrapped up in his public work, and he was so devoted to duty that he forgot how to take relaxation. He was an acknowledged authority on small-pox, which he fought with unceasing activity. he used to say that the only recognition of his labours he wished to have placed on his tombstone was the legend, 'He Vaccinated.'"

          Not "your" Erasmus Garrott, obviously. I didn't do any follow-up on this Dr. Garrott, but "your" Dr. Garrott is undoubtedly related.

          Jill Mitchell
          Harpers Ferry, WV
        • Stephen Recker
          Thanks. That s quite a coincidence, such an unusual name and being from MD. Stephen ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 22 , Mar 15, 2009
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            Thanks. That's quite a coincidence, such an unusual name and being from
            MD.

            Stephen

            On Sunday, March 15, 2009, at 09:49 AM, msjillm53 wrote:
            >
            > The name Erasmus Garrott is vaguely familiar in connection with a
            > work-related paper I did a few years ago about smallpox. I went
            > through my notes and found the following, an obituary published in the
            > June 18, 1898, edition of the publication Naval and Military Medical
            > Services:
            >
            > "Dr. Erasmus Garrott, Chief Medical Inspector, Department of Health,
            > City of Chicago, whose death was announced in a recent issue of the
            > BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, was born at Knoxville, Frederick Co.,
            > Maryland, in 1836. He graduated at the Medical Department of the
            > University of Maryland in 1856, was an interne in the hospital at
            > Baltimore for a year, and was afterwards in country practice for three
            > years in West Virginia. In 1860 he engaged in practice in the mining
            > town of Central City, Gilpin Co., Colorado. Settling in Chicago in
            > 1873, he at once became connected with public sanitary work during the
            > rebuilding of the city after the great fire of 1871. At this time a
            > great responsibility fell upon the medical profession, because of the
            > increased illness in the city from lack of proper food and shelter.
            > Dr. Garrott was appointed Medical Inspector in 1890, serving the city
            > faithfully more than twenty-one years. Dr. Garrott was wholly wrapped
            > up in his public work, and he was so devoted to duty that he forgot
            > how to take relaxation. He was an acknowledged authority on small-pox,
            > which he fought with unceasing activity. he used to say that the only
            > recognition of his labours he wished to have placed on his tombstone
            > was the legend, 'He Vaccinated.'"
            >
            > Not "your" Erasmus Garrott, obviously. I didn't do any follow-up on
            > this Dr. Garrott, but "your" Dr. Garrott is undoubtedly related.
            >
            > Jill Mitchell
            > Harpers Ferry, WV


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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