Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: While we're talking about gaps and roads...

Expand Messages
  • Bill and Glenna Jo Christen
    Gerry, Reno Monument Road is the Old Sharpsburg Road. Larry and Tom, The two maps have labeled dates of 14 September 1862, but I think that were drawn after
    Message 1 of 22 , Mar 5, 2009
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Gerry,

      Reno Monument Road is the Old Sharpsburg Road.

      Larry and Tom,

      The two maps have labeled dates of 14 September 1862, but I think that were drawn after that. There is a note that the maps were "photographed by L. E. Walden of the Treasury Department." They are from RG 77, F91-1 and 91-3. The maps show troop positions at two different times during the battle. The maps are approximately 23 by 28 inches. The maps cover "White Rocks" to "Monument Hill" (south to north) and "Burnt Bridge" at Catoctin Creek to "Boonsborough" in the northwest corner and to the "Road to Rohrersville" in the south west corner (east to west).

      I also have a very small map showing the gaps (without names) in the South Mountain range that was in RG 200, Paine, A-7-11. It does list Federal division commander's names.

      I also have the full-size, uncolored reproduction of the 1858 Frederick County map. The "OR" maps are much more detailed when it comes to the roads. I do have photocopies of an1873 Frederick County map and an earlier, not very detailed map of the area.

      I believe that there was a road that ran from the Mountain House to Frostown (possibly the Dalgren Road today), but that the Old Hagerstown Road left Frostown and continued north and northwest over South Mouton and rejoined the National Road at Zittlesville.

      Bill Christen

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Thomas Clemens
      Bill, What you state seems to be the consensus, thus there must be two OHRs? The one running from Burnt Bridge at Middletown to Myersville and beyond to
      Message 2 of 22 , Mar 5, 2009
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Bill,
        What you state seems to be the consensus, thus there must be two OHRs? The one running from
        Burnt Bridge" at Middletown to Myersville and beyond to Orr's Gap had the "semi-official" label on the 1858 Bond map, but doesn't run anywhere near Turner's Gap nor Zittlestown.


        Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
        Professor of History
        Hagerstown Community College


        >>> "Bill and Glenna Jo Christen" <gwjchris@...> 03/05/09 1:40 PM >>>
        Gerry,

        Reno Monument Road is the Old Sharpsburg Road.

        Larry and Tom,

        The two maps have labeled dates of 14 September 1862, but I think that were drawn after that. There is a note that the maps were "photographed by L. E. Walden of the Treasury Department." They are from RG 77, F91-1 and 91-3. The maps show troop positions at two different times during the battle. The maps are approximately 23 by 28 inches. The maps cover "White Rocks" to "Monument Hill" (south to north) and "Burnt Bridge" at Catoctin Creek to "Boonsborough" in the northwest corner and to the "Road to Rohrersville" in the south west corner (east to west).

        I also have a very small map showing the gaps (without names) in the South Mountain range that was in RG 200, Paine, A-7-11. It does list Federal division commander's names.

        I also have the full-size, uncolored reproduction of the 1858 Frederick County map. The "OR" maps are much more detailed when it comes to the roads. I do have photocopies of an1873 Frederick County map and an earlier, not very detailed map of the area.

        I believe that there was a road that ran from the Mountain House to Frostown (possibly the Dalgren Road today), but that the Old Hagerstown Road left Frostown and continued north and northwest over South Mouton and rejoined the National Road at Zittlesville.

        Bill Christen

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • eighth_conn_inf
        Tom, I looked at the spot blown up on the LOC map and there appears to be an H just above the intersection just south of the name Myersville. Below the
        Message 3 of 22 , Mar 5, 2009
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Tom,

          I looked at the spot blown up on the LOC map and there appears to be an "H" just above the intersection just south of the name "Myersville." Below the intersection below a capital "M" looks like an "a." Further on down there is clearly an "rs" with the top half of a faint "e" in front of the "rs." Apparently the "g" got lost among the three buildings between the "a" and "e." The printed map surprisingly confirms this. Looking at GoogleEarth, the current Old Hagerstown Rd seems to follow the old one at least from the National Pike to Myersville.

          Since the only letter that is not identifiable is the "g" and we have all the rest, I agree that the 1858 Bond map shows that is the "Old Hagerstown Road." But for CW era names of other county roads, maybe there is someone at the Historical Society of Frederick County who is an expert or perhaps someone in Middletown? I have questions into MD DNR and other folks but no replies yet.
          Larry

          --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...> wrote:
          >
          > On the 1858 Isaac Bond map of Frederick County, (link provided by Larry & Steve, thank you) there is a road that intersects withte National Pike at Catoctin Creek west of Middletown. It head roughly northwest, passes west of Bealsville and runs through Myersville to the summit of South Mt. I can make out as a name of the road, look closely please, "Old" then a bit closer to Middletown "illegible - town" and then closer still to Middletown "Road" In modern terms the road I just described is labeled Old Hagerstown Road and runs into the Myersville road just short of Myersville. That is a long way away from what we now call Dahlgren road and what Carman called the Old Hagerstown Road. In short, I think Carman is wrong.
          > The problems are I do not know if (a) there might be more than one OHR in 1862; and (b) I do not know what to call Dahlgren road before it was given that name postwar; and (c) how can the OHR branch off at Bolivar if it is running from Middletown to Myersville? No label on the 1858 Bond map for modern Dahlgren or Mt. Tabor Church roads.
          > Hmm.
          >
          > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
          > Professor of History
          > Hagerstown Community College
          >
          >
          > >>> "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...> 03/05/09 9:25 AM >>>
          > Bill,
          >
          > The atlas map, plate 27, 3, and the surveyed 1858 Frederick County map look to my old eyes as virtually identical. I can even see some of the name of families that are the same. I wonder when the atlas map was drawn, do you have any info--was it during the war or after?
          >
          > I see that on the 1858 map the roads south of the National Pike where the Old Hagerstown are differently placed noticably from Bolivar on the National Pike to the Old Sharpsburg Rd and also the roadto the west south of the Pike. Apparenly there were road improvements between 1858 and when the atlas map was drawn as the newer map shows improved road alignments.
          >
          > Also, the 1858 map shows "Bolivar" near Fox's Gap rather than on the National Pike--interesting. Bottom line is that there are two apparently good maps available for that area but for the slight changes that the four or five years brought.Did you have your atlas map enlarged or is it the same size as in the atlas?
          >
          > Larry
        • eighth_conn_inf
          Just noticed that the detail map of Myersville in the upper left of Bond to the right of the map title show the OHR goes thru that town. Larry
          Message 4 of 22 , Mar 5, 2009
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Just noticed that the detail map of Myersville in the upper left of Bond to the right of the map title show the OHR goes thru that town.
            Larry

            --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...> wrote:
            >
            > Tom,
            >
            > I looked at the spot blown up on the LOC map and there appears to be an "H" just above the intersection just south of the name "Myersville." Below the intersection below a capital "M" looks like an "a." Further on down there is clearly an "rs" with the top half of a faint "e" in front of the "rs." Apparently the "g" got lost among the three buildings between the "a" and "e." The printed map surprisingly confirms this. Looking at GoogleEarth, the current Old Hagerstown Rd seems to follow the old one at least from the National Pike to Myersville.
            >
            > Since the only letter that is not identifiable is the "g" and we have all the rest, I agree that the 1858 Bond map shows that is the "Old Hagerstown Road." But for CW era names of other county roads, maybe there is someone at the Historical Society of Frederick County who is an expert or perhaps someone in Middletown? I have questions into MD DNR and other folks but no replies yet.
            > Larry
          • eighth_conn_inf
            Bill, I saw similar maps on LOC dated 1872 but it isn t clear to me if that is when it was created or printed. Digital ID (Copy 1) g3844b cw0259000
            Message 5 of 22 , Mar 5, 2009
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              Bill,

              I saw similar maps on LOC dated 1872 but it isn't clear to me if that is when it was created or printed.

              Digital ID
              (Copy 1) g3844b cw0259000 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3844b.cw0259000

              Digital ID
              (Copy 1) g3844b cw0258000 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3844b.cw0258000


              Larry



              --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Bill and Glenna Jo Christen" <gwjchris@...> wrote:
              >
              > Gerry,
              >
              > Reno Monument Road is the Old Sharpsburg Road.
              >
              > Larry and Tom,
              >
              > The two maps have labeled dates of 14 September 1862, but I think that were drawn after that. There is a note that the maps were "photographed by L. E. Walden of the Treasury Department." They are from RG 77, F91-1 and 91-3. The maps show troop positions at two different times during the battle. The maps are approximately 23 by 28 inches. The maps cover "White Rocks" to "Monument Hill" (south to north) and "Burnt Bridge" at Catoctin Creek to "Boonsborough" in the northwest corner and to the "Road to Rohrersville" in the south west corner (east to west).
              >
              > I also have a very small map showing the gaps (without names) in the South Mountain range that was in RG 200, Paine, A-7-11. It does list Federal division commander's names.
              >
              > I also have the full-size, uncolored reproduction of the 1858 Frederick County map. The "OR" maps are much more detailed when it comes to the roads. I do have photocopies of an1873 Frederick County map and an earlier, not very detailed map of the area.
              >
              > I believe that there was a road that ran from the Mountain House to Frostown (possibly the Dalgren Road today), but that the Old Hagerstown Road left Frostown and continued north and northwest over South Mouton and rejoined the National Road at Zittlesville.
              >
              > Bill Christen
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Thomas Clemens
              Larry, Thank you for your work on this and your careful scrutiny of the maps. If, and it is an if, we assume that the OHR goes nowhere near Turner s Gap or
              Message 6 of 22 , Mar 5, 2009
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Larry,
                Thank you for your work on this and your careful scrutiny of the maps. If, and it is an if, we assume that the OHR goes nowhere near Turner's Gap or Frosttown Gap, what do we do with Carman's statment. John Frye thinks what is Dahlgren Road now was the earliest crossing of the gap, and thus by default classifies as an OHR. But how did Carman know that, and ignore the other? WHere did the idea of this being OHR originate? Are we looking at another "Ripley and Hamburg Pass" situation?


                Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                Professor of History
                Hagerstown Community College


                >>> "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...> 03/05/09 3:02 PM >>>
                Bill,

                I saw similar maps on LOC dated 1872 but it isn't clear to me if that is when it was created or printed.

                Digital ID
                (Copy 1) g3844b cw0259000 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3844b.cw0259000

                Digital ID
                (Copy 1) g3844b cw0258000 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3844b.cw0258000


                Larry



                --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Bill and Glenna Jo Christen" <gwjchris@...> wrote:
                >
                > Gerry,
                >
                > Reno Monument Road is the Old Sharpsburg Road.
                >
                > Larry and Tom,
                >
                > The two maps have labeled dates of 14 September 1862, but I think that were drawn after that. There is a note that the maps were "photographed by L. E. Walden of the Treasury Department." They are from RG 77, F91-1 and 91-3. The maps show troop positions at two different times during the battle. The maps are approximately 23 by 28 inches. The maps cover "White Rocks" to "Monument Hill" (south to north) and "Burnt Bridge" at Catoctin Creek to "Boonsborough" in the northwest corner and to the "Road to Rohrersville" in the south west corner (east to west).
                >
                > I also have a very small map showing the gaps (without names) in the South Mountain range that was in RG 200, Paine, A-7-11. It does list Federal division commander's names.
                >
                > I also have the full-size, uncolored reproduction of the 1858 Frederick County map. The "OR" maps are much more detailed when it comes to the roads. I do have photocopies of an1873 Frederick County map and an earlier, not very detailed map of the area.
                >
                > I believe that there was a road that ran from the Mountain House to Frostown (possibly the Dalgren Road today), but that the Old Hagerstown Road left Frostown and continued north and northwest over South Mouton and rejoined the National Road at Zittlesville.
                >
                > Bill Christen
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • eighth_conn_inf
                Tom, I m hoping the book I have coming, The Braddock expedition and Fox s Gap in Maryland sheds some light on the area. I just looked at the 24 page
                Message 7 of 22 , Mar 5, 2009
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                  Tom,

                  I'm hoping the book I have coming, "The Braddock expedition and Fox's Gap in Maryland" sheds some light on the area.

                  I just looked at the 24 page introduction to Hamill Kenney's book "The Place Names of Maryland: Their Origin and Meaning," which is really interesting. And after looking at dozens of maps mainly from the LOC and also the CD I have, spelling of names as well as the names themselves in the 1700 and 1800's sometimes defy reason.

                  I see in a book by Karl Raitz, "A Guide to the National Road," that the reason the National Road in that area is often named the National Pike is that the Naional Road between Baltimore and Cumberland was composed of 4 private turnpikes: Baltimore and Frederick Turnpike, Hagerstown and Boonsboro Turnpike, Hagerstown and Conococheague Turnpike, and Cumberland Turnpike. These existed before the National Road was started. The Baltimore-Frederick Tpke organized in 1805 ran from Baltimore to Boonsboro. The Hagerstown and Boonsboro Tpke was the first macadam road in the US built in 1822-23. Lt. JKF Mansfield in 1823 was the first military superintendant of the N Road east from Ohio.

                  Unfortunately not much help on the issues we have been looking at.

                  Larry



                  --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Larry,
                  > Thank you for your work on this and your careful scrutiny of the maps. If, and it is an if, we assume that the OHR goes nowhere near Turner's Gap or Frosttown Gap, what do we do with Carman's statment. John Frye thinks what is Dahlgren Road now was the earliest crossing of the gap, and thus by default classifies as an OHR. But how did Carman know that, and ignore the other? WHere did the idea of this being OHR originate? Are we looking at another "Ripley and Hamburg Pass" situation?
                  >
                  >
                  > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                  > Professor of History
                  > Hagerstown Community
                • Thomas Clemens
                  Yes, technically the National Road went from Cumberland westweard as the east portion already existed. Locally the road from Hagerstown to Frederick was
                  Message 8 of 22 , Mar 5, 2009
                  View Source
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Yes, technically the National Road went from Cumberland westweard as the east portion already existed. Locally the road from Hagerstown to Frederick was called the Bank Road since a consortium of banks financed its construction and owned it.

                    Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                    Professor of History
                    Hagerstown Community College


                    >>> "eighth_conn_inf" <eighth_conn_inf@...> 03/05/09 6:48 PM >>>
                    Tom,

                    I'm hoping the book I have coming, "The Braddock expedition and Fox's Gap in Maryland" sheds some light on the area.

                    I just looked at the 24 page introduction to Hamill Kenney's book "The Place Names of Maryland: Their Origin and Meaning," which is really interesting. And after looking at dozens of maps mainly from the LOC and also the CD I have, spelling of names as well as the names themselves in the 1700 and 1800's sometimes defy reason.

                    I see in a book by Karl Raitz, "A Guide to the National Road," that the reason the National Road in that area is often named the National Pike is that the Naional Road between Baltimore and Cumberland was composed of 4 private turnpikes: Baltimore and Frederick Turnpike, Hagerstown and Boonsboro Turnpike, Hagerstown and Conococheague Turnpike, and Cumberland Turnpike. These existed before the National Road was started. The Baltimore-Frederick Tpke organized in 1805 ran from Baltimore to Boonsboro. The Hagerstown and Boonsboro Tpke was the first macadam road in the US built in 1822-23. Lt. JKF Mansfield in 1823 was the first military superintendant of the N Road east from Ohio.

                    Unfortunately not much help on the issues we have been looking at.

                    Larry



                    --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Larry,
                    > Thank you for your work on this and your careful scrutiny of the maps. If, and it is an if, we assume that the OHR goes nowhere near Turner's Gap or Frosttown Gap, what do we do with Carman's statment. John Frye thinks what is Dahlgren Road now was the earliest crossing of the gap, and thus by default classifies as an OHR. But how did Carman know that, and ignore the other? WHere did the idea of this being OHR originate? Are we looking at another "Ripley and Hamburg Pass" situation?
                    >
                    >
                    > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                    > Professor of History
                    > Hagerstown Community
                  • Bill and Glenna Jo Christen
                    Larry, What I have are draft (pre-publication) copies of the upper halves of the maps for which you provided links. Bill [Non-text portions of this message
                    Message 9 of 22 , Mar 6, 2009
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Larry,

                      What I have are draft (pre-publication) copies of the upper halves of the maps for which you provided links.

                      Bill

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • eighth_conn_inf
                      Thanks Bill, Maybe a guess then is that they were drawn in 1872 based upon OR reports. If this is true, I wonder if the army topos based their maps on the 1858
                      Message 10 of 22 , Mar 6, 2009
                      View Source
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Thanks Bill,

                        Maybe a guess then is that they were drawn in 1872 based upon OR reports. If this is true, I wonder if the army topos based their maps on the 1858 map and then modified it to show the 1862 config of the roads since they obviously could not just go other there and survey the area since it had very liked changed from 1862 to 1872. In any event, using the 1858 and the later atlas maps give a good start to understanding the road net.

                        Larry

                        --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Bill and Glenna Jo Christen" <gwjchris@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Larry,
                        >
                        > What I have are draft (pre-publication) copies of the upper halves of the maps for which you provided links.
                        >
                        > Bill
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • eighth_conn_inf
                        Tom, I just received and looked thru The Braddock expedition and Fox s Gap in Maryland and it does help. The author shows that the road thru Fox s Gap and
                        Message 11 of 22 , Mar 9, 2009
                        View Source
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Tom,

                          I just received and looked thru "The Braddock expedition and Fox's Gap in Maryland" and it does help. The author shows that the road thru Fox's Gap and the road thru Orr's Gap predate the road thru Turner's Pass so the Dahlgren Rd could not be the earliest OHR. I guess at best it was an American Indian trail.

                          He confirms that Orr's Gap is the one the interstate now goes thru. He also shows that "Fox's Gap" and the "Old Sharpsburg Rd" were the correct names during the CW and that Hill's, Stuart's, etc., references to Braddocks' Gap and Braddock's Rd was not in use by Maryland residents at that time. He also implies that the use of "Hamburg Gap" by Ripley et al during the CW was incorrect rather it was Orr's Gap unless my inference is wrong. He also shows that "Braddock's Gap" was used incorrectly for Orr's Gap.

                          I will continue looking thru the book; it is somewhat difficult to easily parse as it contains a lot of original material including surveys and old letters. Another book by Mr. Older may help if anyone has it: "The Land Tracts of the Battlefield of South Mountain: Including Many Other Tracts near the Area from Land Records of Frederick County, Washington County and the Maryland Archives." Perhaps Mr. Older could speak at a SHAF event if he is available?

                          Larry F.

                          > --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Clemens" <clemenst@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Larry,
                          > > Thank you for your work on this and your careful scrutiny of the maps. If, and it is an if, we assume that the OHR goes nowhere near Turner's Gap or Frosttown Gap, what do we do with Carman's statment. John Frye thinks what is Dahlgren Road now was the earliest crossing of the gap, and thus by default classifies as an OHR. But how did Carman know that, and ignore the other? WHere did the idea of this being OHR originate? Are we looking at another "Ripley and Hamburg Pass" situation?
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Thomas G. Clemens D.A.
                          > > Professor of History
                          > > Hagerstown Community
                          >
                        • Stephen Recker
                          I ve come across two gentlemen that both took photos around Sharpsburg circa 1890: Millard F. Smith b. 26 Nov 1852 d. 12 Nov. 1925 Erasmus M. Garrott, M.D.
                          Message 12 of 22 , Mar 14, 2009
                          View Source
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I've come across two gentlemen that both took photos around Sharpsburg
                            circa 1890:

                            Millard F. Smith b. 26 Nov 1852 d. 12 Nov. 1925
                            Erasmus M. Garrott, M.D. b. 1 Jan 1865 d. 6 Nov 1929

                            Interestingly, they are buried rather close to each other (and O.T.
                            Reilly) in Mountain View Cemetery, Sharpsburg.

                            Anyone know anything about these two? Thanks.

                            Stephen
                          • msjillm53
                            ... The name Erasmus Garrott is vaguely familiar in connection with a work-related paper I did a few years ago about smallpox. I went through my notes and
                            Message 13 of 22 , Mar 15, 2009
                            View Source
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In TalkAntietam@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Recker <recker@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I've come across two gentlemen that both took photos around Sharpsburg
                              > circa 1890:
                              >
                              > Millard F. Smith b. 26 Nov 1852 d. 12 Nov. 1925
                              > Erasmus M. Garrott, M.D. b. 1 Jan 1865 d. 6 Nov 1929
                              >
                              > Interestingly, they are buried rather close to each other (and O.T.
                              > Reilly) in Mountain View Cemetery, Sharpsburg.
                              >
                              > Anyone know anything about these two? Thanks.
                              >
                              > Stephen
                              >

                              The name Erasmus Garrott is vaguely familiar in connection with a work-related paper I did a few years ago about smallpox. I went through my notes and found the following, an obituary published in the June 18, 1898, edition of the publication Naval and Military Medical Services:

                              "Dr. Erasmus Garrott, Chief Medical Inspector, Department of Health, City of Chicago, whose death was announced in a recent issue of the BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, was born at Knoxville, Frederick Co., Maryland, in 1836. He graduated at the Medical Department of the University of Maryland in 1856, was an interne in the hospital at Baltimore for a year, and was afterwards in country practice for three years in West Virginia. In 1860 he engaged in practice in the mining town of Central City, Gilpin Co., Colorado. Settling in Chicago in 1873, he at once became connected with public sanitary work during the rebuilding of the city after the great fire of 1871. At this time a great responsibility fell upon the medical profession, because of the increased illness in the city from lack of proper food and shelter. Dr. Garrott was appointed Medical Inspector in 1890, serving the city faithfully more than twenty-one years. Dr. Garrott was wholly wrapped up in his public work, and he was so devoted to duty that he forgot how to take relaxation. He was an acknowledged authority on small-pox, which he fought with unceasing activity. he used to say that the only recognition of his labours he wished to have placed on his tombstone was the legend, 'He Vaccinated.'"

                              Not "your" Erasmus Garrott, obviously. I didn't do any follow-up on this Dr. Garrott, but "your" Dr. Garrott is undoubtedly related.

                              Jill Mitchell
                              Harpers Ferry, WV
                            • Stephen Recker
                              Thanks. That s quite a coincidence, such an unusual name and being from MD. Stephen ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              Message 14 of 22 , Mar 15, 2009
                              View Source
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Thanks. That's quite a coincidence, such an unusual name and being from
                                MD.

                                Stephen

                                On Sunday, March 15, 2009, at 09:49 AM, msjillm53 wrote:
                                >
                                > The name Erasmus Garrott is vaguely familiar in connection with a
                                > work-related paper I did a few years ago about smallpox. I went
                                > through my notes and found the following, an obituary published in the
                                > June 18, 1898, edition of the publication Naval and Military Medical
                                > Services:
                                >
                                > "Dr. Erasmus Garrott, Chief Medical Inspector, Department of Health,
                                > City of Chicago, whose death was announced in a recent issue of the
                                > BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, was born at Knoxville, Frederick Co.,
                                > Maryland, in 1836. He graduated at the Medical Department of the
                                > University of Maryland in 1856, was an interne in the hospital at
                                > Baltimore for a year, and was afterwards in country practice for three
                                > years in West Virginia. In 1860 he engaged in practice in the mining
                                > town of Central City, Gilpin Co., Colorado. Settling in Chicago in
                                > 1873, he at once became connected with public sanitary work during the
                                > rebuilding of the city after the great fire of 1871. At this time a
                                > great responsibility fell upon the medical profession, because of the
                                > increased illness in the city from lack of proper food and shelter.
                                > Dr. Garrott was appointed Medical Inspector in 1890, serving the city
                                > faithfully more than twenty-one years. Dr. Garrott was wholly wrapped
                                > up in his public work, and he was so devoted to duty that he forgot
                                > how to take relaxation. He was an acknowledged authority on small-pox,
                                > which he fought with unceasing activity. he used to say that the only
                                > recognition of his labours he wished to have placed on his tombstone
                                > was the legend, 'He Vaccinated.'"
                                >
                                > Not "your" Erasmus Garrott, obviously. I didn't do any follow-up on
                                > this Dr. Garrott, but "your" Dr. Garrott is undoubtedly related.
                                >
                                > Jill Mitchell
                                > Harpers Ferry, WV


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.